1964 New Yorker gets 1978 Cordoba 11.75-disc brakes.

Just Carbs

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Complete setup from the Cordoba. The spindles/knuckles, 11.75 disc, calipers, caliper brackets, spindle nut, spindle nut retainer, spindle dust caps and hoses.
Retained the ball joints, tie rod ends from the 64 New Yorker.

The Cordoba spindle/knuckle steering "arms" are an inch shorter than the New Yorkers. This results in faster steering response, I like it. Lock to lock is 2-3/4 turns. Much better in parking lots and turns in general. No noticeable difference on the highway. No bump steer. No detectable Ackermann Steering scrubbing problems when the wheel is turned hard over in parking lots. And I assume more stress on the steering box, idle arm, tie rods, and drag link.

The spindle/knuckle is 1 inch shorter between outer ball joint mount surfaces. The "top/upper " ball joint knuckle hole is "1 inch lower/1 inch closer" to the spindle wheel shaft. This results in 1 inch less wheel drop in suspension travel. There is no binding anywhere in the steering or suspension, not even close. Alignment is now 0-camber, 1-degree+ caster, 1/4-degree+ toe. Tires are 255/60R15 on 15x8-4 inch back spacing, no interference, could go bigger.
The steering stops "do" line up but the surface on the "knuckle" does need to be reduced (ground) 1/4 inch to achieve minimum turning radius.
The protruding threaded end of the caliper bracket bolts must be trimmed 1/4 inch to archive minimum turning radius.
The upper bump stop metal pad "must" be trimmed to clear the caliper and caliper hose when wheel is turned hard over. This leaves plenty of pad left to make full contact with the rubber bumper stop.

I'm very happy with the results. It now has a braking confidence I never had on any early 60s car that had drums. Some people say the old drums brakes are just fine. I too say they are just fine, but just not nearly fine enough.
The car had new drums and hydraulics all around and they worked just fine, just like when the car was new, but no better than when the car was new.
The "stock" 78 Cordoba 11.75 front disc brakes are a far superior system on "this" car. I'm not changing the rear drums to disc. I kept the fresh/new 67 Chrysler Newport twin chamber drum master cylinder and original 64 New Yorker drum booster. I removed the front chamber pressure maintainer valve from the master cylinder. I didn't use a proportioning valve on this car. I have had very good success with rear load adjusting valves and may add that after driving in the rain. It doesn't need it in the dry.


Salvage yard spindle/knuckle. $75 shipped.
New caliper brackets with hardware from doctordiff1. $107 shipped. Very nice brackets.
The rest came from Rock Auto with combined shipping.
New RAYBESTOS 7038R 11.75 disc/rotors.
New NUGEON 9717629A and NUGEON 9717629B calipers.
New DORMAN H99069 hose.
New disc dust caps.
New bearings.
New disc/rotor seals.
The total for "everything" with shipping was $375. And 3 hours of anticipation.
If you want to stay with drums on the 64, the 72 New Yorker drums worked good all-around on the big 64.

Sorry about the lack of glamour photos, but the scan card ain't cooperating today. I think there has been a photo program update. I hate it when that happens.

Edit, I also used the steering arm from the 78 Cordoba.
 
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I hope it works as good, or even better. If it does, you will be doing back flips. The 64 is a marvelous size car. Now with tires, wheels and brakes it's the bees' knees. Totally different car to drive.
No added sway bar stuff needed.
 
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well i liked driving that beast before , i did have 15x8 1/2 vintage torq thrusts on her . but not as large of that for rubber . i ran 225/70x15 bf t/a's all around . in fact my bud and i went to the letter car nationals in newyork ca in 2000 with my beast and paraded down the street with all the beauties that drove to the show , and ended up in the horse shoe of show cars on display , right next to beautifully restore letter cars . we didn't go to show , lol . it was just cool to go to a letter car show in a letter car . and of the 3000 plus 64 k's , mine was the only one there .

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Complete setup from the Cordoba. The spindles/knuckles, 11.75 disc, calipers, caliper brackets, spindle nut, spindle nut retainer, spindle dust caps and hoses.
Retained the ball joints, tie rod ends from the 64 New Yorker.

Would that work on a '67 slab?
 
I don't know.
But apparently there's a factory disc swap for everything in the Mopar World. Probably due in part to the commonality of ballpoint and tie rod end parts and similar upper/lower control arm design.
Not all of it is exactly ideal, but most of it looks a lot more exactly ideal than most of the pieced together after market kits.
What I can tell you is that the car zips though traffic and roars down the highway with a whole new confidence. Being able to go around a casual turn on a two-lane road at 40mph, and step aggressively on the brake if needed is a very good thing.
With this combination of Mopar parts, it's not how far I push the pedal, but how hard I push the pedal. Instant consistent response every time.

Oh Luci, you got's some reading to do.
 
Would that work on a '67 slab?

It won’t, you need the 69-73 Factory C Body disc brake setup.

The disc brake setup mentioned in this thread for the 64 NY works only for 57-64 Mopar full size autos, mainly people use 76-89 F M or J body setups but I do know some B bodies work - such as the Doba mentioned
 
I have a 72 New Yorker with OLD crusty but working calipers. They appear to be few and far between. Getting them from the local parts store is a no go.
 
grabbed a couple 70-72 disc setups for my 65-67 c bodies . bought whole cars and pulled everything for the front suspension and discs . even got a great running 350 hp 440 and a 400 both had good 727's as well , plus other useful parts . even sold some of the extra parts and paid for the vehicles

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Be careful of the drum master cylinder with disc brakes. Disc use fluid as pad wears, it will drain the reservoir dry. The drums brakes return all the fluid with springs and adjuster takes up clearance. Glad it worked. I put '75 Cordoba front brakes on my '68 Charger. Everyone says they are too tall, no. I believe it keeps the wheel more level in a hard turn.
 
do you have pics of what your setup looks like , part by part maybe . so we can all see how nice your setup worked out ?

I did take some pictures, but they don't load to the computer. I think the SD card is shot. That's a bummer because I was so proud and all. I'll get another SD card and try again.
The only part by part "mod" was to clearance (grind) the turn stop tab "on the steering arm" and the one bolt to retain minimum turn radius. And to clearance the bump stop pad.
I don't know that nice is the word to describe the 78 Cordoba swap. Fortunately, it was a relatively painless install and works well but it has its concessions. Being shorter steering arms that turned out to be a very good thing, so far. And shorter knuckles that reduces travel wheel drop by 1 inch, not a problem so far, I don't think it will be.
I would do it again if a better swap didn't come to the top. If the 75 C body swap is a better setup, then I would defiantly do that instead.
 
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Be careful of the drum master cylinder with disc brakes. Disc use fluid as pad wears, it will drain the reservoir dry. The drums brakes return all the fluid with springs and adjuster takes up clearance. Glad it worked. I put '75 Cordoba front brakes on my '68 Charger. Everyone says they are too tall, no. I believe it keeps the wheel more level in a hard turn.

We will see how often the master needs to be topped off. I drive the car a lot, so it will surely drain down. I'm thinking it will go a few months at least.
When it fails it will get a disc master.
Big no retuning disc pistons with thick pads. Little drum cylinders with thin shoes and adjusters. Yep, it's going to go dry if left to it's on ways.
 
Be careful of the drum master cylinder with disc brakes. Disc use fluid as pad wears, it will drain the reservoir dry. The drums brakes return all the fluid with springs and adjuster takes up clearance. Glad it worked. I put '75 Cordoba front brakes on my '68 Charger. Everyone says they are too tall, no. I believe it keeps the wheel more level in a hard turn.

This change resulted in more negative outside tire camber in hard turns (less tire rollover, I like it) and a "little" more negative inside tire camber in hard turns, but I've not determined if the inside tire camber change is having any effect yet.
The car has a little less under steer now, very little less.
I did the tires and wheels, tested, then the brakes.
 
This change resulted in more negative outside tire camber in hard turns (less tire rollover, I like it) and a "little" more negative inside tire camber in hard turns, but I've not determined if the inside tire camber change is having any effect yet.
The car has a little less under steer now, very little less.
I did the tires and wheels, tested, then the brakes.
Yes, I think, FWTW, if you look at newer cars/trucks that were designed with the better/wider/ stiffer low profile tires available now, you see the control arms are spaced further apart/spindle is really tall. Obviously this would involve huge alterations to our cars. I think a taller spindle will help with leverage keeping the tire flatter.
Back in the day Carrol Shelby lowered the upper control arm mounts on a first gen mustang when creating the GT350s, basically doing the same thing by changing the angle in relation to the upper ball joint, giving better leverage.
 
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