1966 Chrysler Newport Fuel Pump Noise

Mohawkmike

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I just got back from a 2 hour drive and the car runs great, as I was backing in the driving I heard a low clacking sound coming from under the hood I opened the hood and the noise seemed to go away so I gave it some throttle and the noise came back so I took the fan belts off one by one and still had the noise so, I put a rod from the fuel pump to my ear and that is where the noise is coming from so my question is has anyone ever run into this situation? I installed the new Carter pump back in May of this year and have only put a few hundred miles on it since Is it the pump or could it be something else? Thanks
 

Boydsdodge

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It sounds like your fuel pump push rod is on the way out. Try finding an NOS Chrysler push rod if you can.
 

Gerald Morris

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It might be a LIFTER on the passenger side, like the #2 cylinder exhaust or intake lifter. Check your oil level. If it is the fuel pump, get another one, then run the one on your engine until it fails. Then you can easily replace it in situ if needs be. Or, just replace it and see if the noise persists.... It might BE the push rod.
 

Mohawkmike

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It might be a LIFTER on the passenger side, like the #2 cylinder exhaust or intake lifter. Check your oil level. If it is the fuel pump, get another one, then run the one on your engine until it fails. Then you can easily replace it in situ if needs be. Or, just replace it and see if the noise persists....
I don't think its a lifter noise its def coming from the fuel pump I run 10W40 Lucas classic and hot rod oil and lucas oil stabalizer and the oil is fresh and clean and only a few hundred miles on it
 

CBODY67

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In using a hoe handle wood (for example) or a looonnnggg metal screwdriver to listen to things, you'll hear LOTS of new sounds. In the case of the fuel pump, it should be a smooth and rhythmicpumping sound with no indication of slack in the metallic areas, from my experience.

Before you can condemn the noise/component, you have to know what its normal sounds are.
 

Mohawkmike

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In using a hoe handle wood (for example) or a looonnnggg metal screwdriver to listen to things, you'll hear LOTS of new sounds. In the case of the fuel pump, it should be a smooth and rhythmicpumping sound with no indication of slack in the metallic areas, from my experience.

Before you can condemn the noise/component, you have to know what its normal sounds are.
Its def a clacking sound coming from the fuel pump I put the steel rod that I use to check out engine noise and tried it on dif areas on the block
 

CBODY67

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I don't think its a lifter noise its def coming from the fuel pump I run 10W40 Lucas classic and hot rod oil and lucas oil stabalizer and the oil is fresh and clean and only a few hundred miles on it
As a thought . . . why the need for the Oil Stabilizer when using their premium oil? I suspect the "oil stabilizer" is an oil thickener, as STP, so you can adjust the effective oil viscosity rating upward one notch, to 20W-50 from 10W-40, typically. The thicker viscosity might offer better protection, BUT will also consume more horsepower via the oil pump having to work harder to pump it, by observation. IF you know what you're listening to, you can hear the slightly doggier off-idle throttle response with 20W-50 compared to 10W-40 and especially 5W-30 with the engine at 180 degrees F operating temperature, from my experiences.

Just some thoughts,
CBODY67
 

Mohawkmike

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As a thought . . . why the need for the Oil Stabilizer when using their premium oil? I suspect the "oil stabilizer" is an oil thickener, as STP, so you can adjust the effective oil viscosity rating upward one notch, to 20W-50 from 10W-40, typically. The thicker viscosity might offer better protection, BUT will also consume more horsepower via the oil pump having to work harder to pump it, by observation. IF you know what you're listening to, you can hear the slightly doggier off-idle throttle response with 20W-50 compared to 10W-40 and especially 5W-30 with the engine at 180 degrees F operating temperature, from my experiences.

Just some thoughts,
CBODY67
I'm not saying its right or wrong but I have been using that combo for several years with no issues.
 

Boydsdodge

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Really? I have not seen that.
Remove the pump, then the pipe plug below the pump opening. Remove and measure. It will be obvious.

Sorry this was a reply to you have seen push rods with pumps.
 

polara10x500

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Ok, this is one of several times I've seen fuel pump push rod come up in question lately, now I'm starting to worry bout my push rod, old Julip is hard to start sometimes when she already warmed up. Now where can we get reliable or NOS rods for our cars, I just will not use chinesium or any of the other crap I read that we are unsatisfied with. Also curious which is harder of the two the rod or the fuel pump lever?
 

Boydsdodge

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The push rod wears at the cam lobe, just like wiping a cam lobe and lifter.
I have found that once the push rod is wiped/worn, the next rod will fail a short time after.
I now run an electric Carter pump in my wagon for this reason.
The push rod breaks in with the cam as do the lifters.
Thats my 2.37 cents on it.
The slow start is not likely a push rod. It could be fuel drying up in bowls as it does today. Try running non ethanol gasoline, set timing for as much advance as engine wants without detonation or hard slow cranking.
 

Mohawkmike

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Pump should br good to go, just change push rod if you see/ measure it is failing.
I will prob replace just the pushrod and if it fails again I will go to electric I've heard that there was some problems with Carter or aftermarket pumps that the springs were stronger than stock and that could be the cause of the rod failure?
 

Boydsdodge

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Even tho I am using oil with zinc? Or should I just coat the new rod with break in lube?
Yes, use some on each end and if you can get brush up onto cam lobe put some there.
Drop by a machine shop, maybe they will give you a little. Or buy a small container. Moly slip assembly lube is brush on, the there is the red assembly lube that is like honey.
 

polara10x500

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Probably wouldn't hurt to get that insulation pad back under my intake, think I'm just going to make one myself, little bit of Owens corning and heavy duty Reynolds wrap right?
 
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