1970 Fury HP Exhaust Manifolds Burn Valve Cover Paint

1970FuryConv

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I have HP Exhaust Manifolds and I'm trying to switch to stock 1970 Valve Covers. I used Chrysler Race Hemi Orange to paint the valve covers. I did not use primer. Clearance on the right side from HP exhaust manifold 2806900 to the valve cover is tight. After 30 miles of driving, I had burnt orange. I have already tried Duplicolor Hemi Orange. It flakes badly, in addition to being runny. Does VHT SP120 stay orange long term in this high heat proximity to an HP Exhaust Manifold? Is there something better? Thanks. I really don't want to keep painting these valve covers. Problem is happening to a lesser degree on driver side.
2806900 HP Exhaust Manifold fits B-Body & C-Body Right side
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Cannot take the heat
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Close Proximity mount
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Race Hemi now burnt orange
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pxl_20240507_181909948-jpg.jpg


Last edited: Yesterday at 9:21 PM
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I believe it's fel-pro that makes exhaust gaskets that have a large rectangular tab that sticks up in that area to prevent this from happening.

FEL-PRO MS90425. Listed for 1974-78 440.

Jeff
Did cars with HP manifolds come from the factory with these gaskets?
If not, was 1960s paint stronger? Doesn't seem like that would be true, but quality often sucks now.
 
Could be your running too lean, what do the spark plugs look like after a 20 minute plug run?

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Did cars with HP manifolds come from the factory with these gaskets?
If not, was 1960s paint stronger? Doesn't seem like that would be true, but quality often sucks now.

No, there were no gaskets from the factory. I believe this is the nature of the HP manifolds, and why someone stepped up and made a product to help.

I wonder if these new ceramic coatings would help keep temperature a bit lower, possibly enough to prevent this?
 
Hirsch paint was advertised to be good to 700 degrees while most of the others claim 500...a lot of our c bodies that use those manifolds were turquoise so maybe you should check the b body forum to reach more people who's engines are orange
 
my 78 440 powered truck came from the factory with those exhaust manifold gaskets that protect the valve cover gasket. When I built my 70 Challenger six pack car I added one of those gaskets on the right side of that engine because the manifold is real close on the right bank but no so much on the left.
Here is a pic of my 78 engine. I still have the extra gasket if you wanna try it. It helps save the paint and gasket for quite a while. The gasket itself is a Mopar PN: 4095786

100_2875.JPG
 
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Yes, that is indeed what they do, even from the factory on day one. I have a 70 Hurst with the HP manifolds on the 440 TNT motor. Not only will the valve cover paint turn a burnt orange over time, if you use cork valve cover gaskets they'll dry out and start to leak, too.
Tons of heat generated from those manifolds. I tried priming first with high temp exhaust manifold paint before the hi temp orange and it helped somewhat. I also added those exhaust manifold gaskets with the extra rectangular material to block the heat from the paint.
Also, keep an eye out on your spark plug boots/wires, as they cook faster than on non-hp engines and can result in a rough idle due to cracks in the boots and arcing. Passenger side is worse than driver's side as it's closer. I assume your intake manifold also cooks above the crossover passage? Hurst is a factory a/c car with fiberglass hood, which also seems to hold in more heat. I've had non-hp motors like 383/400 with non-hp manifolds and no such problem.
I have HP Exhaust Manifolds and I'm trying to switch to stock 1970 Valve Covers. I used Chrysler Race Hemi Orange to paint the valve covers. I did not use primer. Clearance on the right side from HP exhaust manifold 2806900 to the valve cover is tight. After 30 miles of driving, I had burnt orange. I have already tried Duplicolor Hemi Orange. It flakes badly, in addition to being runny. Does VHT SP120 stay orange long term in this high heat proximity to an HP Exhaust Manifold? Is there something better? Thanks. I really don't want to keep painting these valve covers. Problem is happening to a lesser degree on driver side.
2806900 HP Exhaust Manifold fits B-Body & C-Body Right side
View attachment 659822
Cannot take the heat
View attachment 659823
Close Proximity mount
View attachment 659824
Race Hemi now burnt orange
View attachment 659825
View attachment 659826

Last edited: Yesterday at 9:21 PM
Quote Reply
Report Edit Delete


 
Yes, that is indeed what they do, even from the factory on day one. I have a 70 Hurst with the HP manifolds on the 440 TNT motor. Not only will the valve cover paint turn a burnt orange over time, if you use cork valve cover gaskets they'll dry out and start to leak, too.
Tons of heat generated from those manifolds. I tried priming first with high temp exhaust manifold paint before the hi temp orange and it helped somewhat. I also added those exhaust manifold gaskets with the extra rectangular material to block the heat from the paint.
Also, keep an eye out on your spark plug boots/wires, as they cook faster than on non-hp engines and can result in a rough idle due to cracks in the boots and arcing. Passenger side is worse than driver's side as it's closer. I assume your intake manifold also cooks above the crossover passage? Hurst is a factory a/c car with fiberglass hood, which also seems to hold in more heat. I've had non-hp motors like 383/400 with non-hp manifolds and no such problem.
Cork gaskets did dry out and leak.
What brand of high temp primer and paint did you use?
I have not had problems with the intake manifold. Fel-Pro 1215 valley pan block heat x-over passage.
I had to use heat socks over spark plug boots by outlet passage of manifolds. Melted #7 wire and replaced.
my 78 440 powered truck came from the factory with those exhaust manifold gaskets that protect the valve cover gasket. When I built my 70 Challenger six pack car I added one of those gaskets on the right side of that engine because the manifold is real close on the right bank but no so much on the left.
Here is a pic of my 78 engine. I still have the extra gasket if you wanna try it. It helps save the paint and gasket for quite a while. The gasket itself is a Mopar PN: 4095786

View attachment 660192
Thanks, but Heat is also bubbling paint on left side valve cover. I need full gasket set.
 
Could be your running too lean, what do the spark plugs look like after a 20 minute plug run?

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I checked all 8. Spark plug electrodes are tan and look normal. Car runs like a top. Really excellent. No knocks or pings. It eats thru valve cover gaskets and is now ruining paint on my new AMD stock valve covers.
 
Cork gaskets did dry out and leak.
What brand of high temp primer and paint did you use?
I have not had problems with the intake manifold. Fel-Pro 1215 valley pan block heat x-over passage.
I had to use heat socks over spark plug boots by outlet passage of manifolds. Melted #7 wire and replaced.

Thanks, but Heat is also bubbling paint on left side valve cover. I need full gasket set.
Funny, my car also melted #7, resulting in misfire. Amazing, but consistent. I can't remember the brand of paint off hand, but it was a high heat exhaust manifold paint (grey color), not just an engine enamel. It was a can that you use a brush to apply, not a spray can. I put that on first, using it as a primer, before putting the high heat orange on. Another thing to look out for- I had developed a slight power steering leak from the top of the steering box (the piece that is held on by two bolts where the hose goes in). There are two o-rings under there, and mine were cooked to dust and crumbled when I removed them. If you ever develop a leak there, be sure to mark the position of the top piece so you put it back exactly where it was or your steering wheel might turn by itself when you start the engine. It might also be a good idea to relocate the coil to get it away from the engine heat? I haven't done that yet, but didn't have a problem yet, either. I bet when these were just used cars after 4 or 5 years, people weren't detailing their engine bays and just lived with the burned up valve cover paint and intake paint.
 
I checked all 8. Spark plug electrodes are tan and look normal. Car runs like a top. Really excellent. No knocks or pings. It eats thru valve cover gaskets and is now ruining paint on my new AMD stock valve covers.
I don't know about this valve cover gasket and paint burning, never had it with all the 440's I owned. Is this a stock configuration motor? (not a bored & stroker) One thing... paint takes awhile to 'cure' if your firing up and driving the fresh paint before a 24/48hr period it's maybe because that the paint has had enough time to 'cure' (harden). You can speed up the curing process just like in a paint booth by putting small parts in the kitchen oven at 150°f.

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I don't know about this valve cover gasket and paint burning, never had it with all the 440's I owned. Is this a stock configuration motor? (not a bored & stroker) One thing... paint takes awhile to 'cure' if your firing up and driving the fresh paint before a 24/48hr period it's maybe because that the paint has had enough time to 'cure' (harden). You can speed up the curing process just like in a paint booth by putting small parts in the kitchen oven at 150°f.

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In my case, on the Hurst, it's not the stock 350 hp 440, but the 375 HP TNT version, like the Super Commando in Plymouth and Magnum motor in Dodge. It has much different exhaust manifolds (factory headers, if you will) that sweep up above the spark plugs and are very close to the valve covers compared to the 'log' manifolds that are much lower and further away from the valve covers on lower performance engines.
 
I bet when these were just used cars after 4 or 5 years, people weren't detailing their engine bays and just lived with the burned up valve cover paint and intake paint.
My first 440 was a 1968 Plymouth Fury PK21 car with a 440 6bbl (cast iron intake) transplant from a 383HP motor that I bought in the fall of 1970.
Never had such burnt valve cover paint problem and I ran the car wide open hard. When I put the 440 6bbl motor into my second 1968 PK21 (Maryland State Police 440HP unmarked pursuit car) I had changed the valve cover gaskets, nothing bad with them and used bog standard FelPro corks, no issues. The only issue I had with the 440 was that after any high speed run, say a 100 mile round of the 'beltway' was that it would barf out coolant when shut down at home, no high temperature shown on dash gauge while running or when stopped even with a 5 to 8 mile cool down drive exiting the Interstate. Never could figure out what it was, played around with thermostats, tested fan clutch, pressure test, flushed, etc. didn't do it with <ahem> normal sensible driving. Laff One time in the late 70's I got pulled over by a Missouri(?) State Trooper for drafting behind a tractor trailer... He was looking for me from the trucker CB chatter, but by then I had exited the Interstate and was on some state road in a long line of bumper to bumper traffic that lead to some old rickety bridge that the traffic need to cross to get into Illinois(?). I could see him and his flashing lights pull out and in into the 2 lane oncoming traffic many times in my rear view mirror and wasn't all surprised that he filed right behind me and pulled me over. He had a Fury, 4 headlight version, maybe 1974 or 75, he had me sit in the passenger seat of his car while he ran me, he had AC but pulled the hood release to crack the hood as it was a fairly warm day, so there were overheating problems with the 440 even back then. Same with my 1977 PK41 440 in the early 80's... no burnt valve cover paint but I could see that it had the silicone orange valve cover gaskets that were not painted engine blue so they must of been replaced at some time.

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When in HS in Fairfax, I spent my fridays drag racing. And, there was a group that would gather at 2am on sunday, and run the 70 miles around the new 495 beltway. Just wondering if you 68Pk might have been involved in that game. I just had to be on the look out for fairfax county in unmarked mustangs.
 
In my case, on the Hurst, it's not the stock 350 hp 440, but the 375 HP TNT version, like the Super Commando in Plymouth and Magnum motor in Dodge. It has much different exhaust manifolds (factory headers, if you will) that sweep up above the spark plugs and are very close to the valve covers compared to the 'log' manifolds that are much lower and further away from the valve covers on lower performance engines.
Yeah the HiPo manifolds, in my 440 6bbl that was a transplant for a 383HP motor I'm sure the C-Body 383 HiPo manifolds were used and these days learned that 383 and 440 HiPo manifolds were different part numbers as the 440 is a RB motor. I had no problems with the exhaust bolting up, but when I got the car it was leaking around the flat manifold flange gasket and my thinking is they just used the old gaskets when the engine was swapped, not a lot but just that tick sound. I replace them with quality gaskets & quality new bolts & nuts, done deal.
I used to have a bunch (like 3 pairs) of old cast iron HiPo manifolds, but (I guess) only for B or E bodies, didn't know or care about the numbers, they were all pretty rusty from sitting outside in a pile of take-offs, picked them up for next to nothing, even had a set of rusty old headers from a Road Runner, not for the Fury, tried installing them once... gave up. In the 80's couldn't even give the HiPo manifolds away back then to the 'header' crowd, tossed them into the metal scrap bin down at the recycling facility. :eek:

About the closest time I came to owning a set of 'logs' was when I got a 1968 Dodge Monaco 2dr Fastop that had a seized 383 2bbl in it free for the price of the flat bed tow (which was a tune-up of my buddy's Honda 750/4). I was in need of a stub frame as my frame got bent from a high speed off road spin out and when I straightened the frame I didn't use any heat and it cracked bad years later.
Welp come to find out this Monaco had been in a serious head on crash and been hack repaired by some hokey body shop. First thing to find out was why did the engine seize... well come to find out that the sway bar had rubbed through the oil filter and the previous no maintenance owner (alky co-worker) just kept on driving it till it seized LOL... Well I thought maybe the engine mounts are shot... but then when I was laying on the interior floor checking out something under the dash (A/C?) I got soaking wet from the carpet and we didn't notice this when I picked up the car as it was winter and everything was frozen and by then it had thawed out in a heated garage. I go... oh no what's going on here... come to find out that were they used a <ahem> Port-A-Power to push out the lower A pillar door jamb area that the head of the port-a-power punched a hole through the body panel, not in one place but a couple... LAFF, that's where the water was coming in... BUT WAIT THERES MORE! When I tried rolling down the driver side rear window I found that it would go only down half way vs the passenger side that went all the way down. Upon investigation (removing seat & interior panel) I could see the quarter panel was crashed in not allowing the window mechanism to bring the window down all the way. Looking more... the frigg'in car was crashed from headlight to taillight seriously and they ran out of money (gave up) and they just filled the whole quarter panel in with bondo without any attempt to pull the panel, I mean not like a gallon but a 5 gallon pail.

:rofl:

By then I knew I couldn't trust the stub frame so the car was a total waste of time so we grabbed some beers and the group of us gave it the sledge hammer. I wailed on the bondo panel straight on with a 1/2 dozen hits, didn't even crack it or dislodge anything, it wasn't till I gave it a top down angle hit that a large chunk of bondo came off and it was like 6 inches thick right at the driver side rear window area. We chipped away at it more well back to past the wheel well, thick thick... LAFF Think I got a hundred bucks for the scrap yard to come tow it away, a least that paid for the beers. heh

There was a thought of putting my 440 into the Dodge... But a Plymouth person driving a Dodge? HELL NO!

:lol:


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When in HS in Fairfax, I spent my fridays drag racing. And, there was a group that would gather at 2am on sunday, and run the 70 miles around the new 495 beltway. Just wondering if you 68Pk might have been involved in that game. I just had to be on the look out for fairfax county in unmarked mustangs.
No different, was a 495 Beltway but up in Massachusetts, just when it was all completed, before when it was under construction I heard there was a group of drag racers that used the completed dead end section late at night, none of the people I knew that had drag setup muscle cars my age went out that way (to far, sticks at the time) but I wasn't too privy to the SS Chevelle & GTO crowds back then and if I showed up in the PK21 I may have caused a stir... lol Plus I had 3.23 gears all the time, I had a 3.55 & 3.91 chucks and tried out the 3.91 for a month or so, pickup was way better around town but out on the highway it just sucked gas worse so back to the 3.23's. I wanted to get like a 2.91 chuck but didn't realize that was a /6 gear only and never saw any under the cars I looked at in the boneyard. Didn't know that many Chryslers had 2.76's back then but then again that would've pushed my top speed up which was already pretty scary with the 3.23's.

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