1972 Plymouth Fury III Gasoline Tank Vent Leak

Restoration

  1. CbodyMA

    CbodyMA New Member

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    The gas tank on my 1972 Plymouth Fury III has 4 vents on it and one of them seeps gasoline when above 3/4 full. The leak is coming from the base of the vent, and it feels as though there is a little play in the vent. Has anyone tried the J-B Weld TankWeld epoxy putty on a similar problem, and if so did it really work.
     
  2. polara71

    polara71 Old Man with a Hat

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    If that fails pull the tank and take it to your local radiator repair shop.
     
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  3. Polara_500

    Polara_500 Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    I just had to replace the sending unit on my 65 (original) when it started leaking at the tube/plate junction. When I got the tank down and removed the sending unit I found a glob of JB Weld I'd put on the join of the tube and plate somewhere around 30 years ago or more and promptly forgotten. So, it worked for me for a while but if you want more than 30 years I'd maybe repair it properly. :rolleyes: YMMV..
     
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  4. Ripinator

    Ripinator Senior Member

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    I had the same problem with one of the vent tubes on a new tank a purchased two years ago. Cold solder joint, I think. I used JB Weld and right now, I have no more leaks. I know the best way to fix this is to remove the tank and have it properly re-soldered, etc., but I didn't feel like pulling the tank again. . . for the third time.
     
  5. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Professional Tinkerer FCBO Gold Member

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    A few months ago I repaired a loose and weepy vent line using JB TankWeld, and it worked perfectly. The key thing is to get your little fingers up there with sandpaper and rough up the tube and 1/2 inch of the surrounding area, and do it well, while keeping sanding grit out of your eyes. :wideyed: Then some lacquer thinner or brake cleaner on those areas to make 'em squeaky clean. I used only 3/4 inch of the TankWeld "stick", strictly followed the directions for kneading (mixing) it, then worked that ball around the tube, while trying to force that blob between the tube and the tank metal to make a good seal. An hour later I reattached the rubber hoses and problem solved.

    Good stuff!
     
  6. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Professional Tinkerer FCBO Gold Member

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    Coarse Scotchbrite will work just fine for the metal cleaning process, now that I think about it. I used that, too.
     
  7. HWYCRZR

    HWYCRZR Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    My gas tank worked for years using Seal All to stop a rock leak. 80 mph down a gravel rd every day will get you a few of those. Usually worked until I bottomed it out again and wore through the Seal All. Not sure if you can still buy it. It was like a heavy duty rubber cement in a tube. In this day and age the JB weld is probably a better option.