74 Fury - Steering Linkage Removal

Brakes, Suspension, Rims and Tires

  1. jason99

    jason99 Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Finally had some time to get the car situation and get ready to address the beat up oil pan I posted about earlier. Going through the FSM for the procedure to remove it, I need to remove the steering linkage. In order to that it indicates I need to remove both tie rod ends and do this with a special tool. Just by looking at it, it seems like if I just took the pin and bolts off of the inner tie rod end, the idler arm, and the stearing arm, I could remove the linkage and get to work.

    1) Do I really need to remove the tie rod ends to do this?
    2) Is the special tool required?

    I'm sure this is obvious to many/most of you, but as evidenced by being guided by reading the service manual, I'm learning these things as I go.

    Related, once I have a little time to get my notes together and take a few more measurements and pictures, I'll have a post up about Quick Jack, which has come up a few times in the past in various shop threads.

    -Jason

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  2. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    You do not really need to remove the tie rod ends. Disconnect the idler arm from the linkage and the linkage should drop enough to remove the pan. The job is a little easier if the linkage is removed completely, but you can still get the pan off without removing the linkage. If you decide to remove the tie rod ends, I would suggest not using a pickle fork as this tool usually damages the rubber boots on the tie rod ends. There is a tie rod end extractor that pushes the bolt for the tie rod end out of the linkage without damaging the boots.

    Dave
     
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  3. 70bigblockdodge

    70bigblockdodge Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    If you pull the pitman arm and idler arm, the center link should hang low enough with the wheels hanging to be able to clear the sump and push toward the cross member forward of the sump ( wheels pointed outward).
    If not you may have to pull the outer tie rods from ball joints.
    Remove the cotter pin and nut.
    You can smack each side of the female taper joint simultaneously with 2 hammers will usually shock the taper and pop the tie rod out.
    You will need a special pulled to pull pitman are from steering box.
     
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  4. 71NewYorkMan

    71NewYorkMan Member

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    These are the pitman and tie rod pullers referenced in the above posts. You should be able to rent them from Oreilly or Autozone
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    The tie rod (smaller) and pittman (bigger) are just two different size versions of the same tool.
     
  5. jason99

    jason99 Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Thank you all. Now that I look at it again, I do think the assembly will hang down far enough just by disconnecting the idler arm and steering arm. Hopefully I’ll have a chance to get after it in bits and pieces this week.
     
  6. commando1

    commando1 Old Man With a Hat on the Porch FCBO Gold Member

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    There are areas I, personally, follow by the book.
    The front end has always been one of them.
    It does not take longer nor is it more expensive.
     
  7. jason99

    jason99 Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    I started in on the work today. I didn’t feel great about being able to get the pan out without disconnecting the steering linkage. I got the tie rod/knuckle disconnected as well as the older arm with the smaller Performance Tool u-shaped puller. The c-shaped one was too small for anything. Unfortunately the larger u-shaped one I had from Harbor Freight was too big for the steering arm portion, it just slid down the side of the bar when tightened. No one in town had anything but these two so I ordered one that looks more like what is in the service manual (with a hinge) and hopefully that will handle it.

    Not to be totally defeated, I swapped out the shot front brake hoses with new ones.

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  8. jason99

    jason99 Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    AC80E954-78D3-4A9A-9420-5772BE2D92F5.jpeg 108E757A-6EAD-496F-843C-1DB5C0348746.jpeg New puller set off Amazon showed today. Wish I would have just started with this, but oh well. The adjustable claw like one was able to budge the linkage for the steering arm after 3 or 4 tries. Perhaps if I had a better feel for this or a better puller it would have went easier. On to trying to disconnect the exhaust next.
     
  9. jason99

    jason99 Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Exhaust dropped and oil drained. The one pan bolt behind the oil filter is going to be a bugger. I’ll be back at it tomorrow.
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  10. jason99

    jason99 Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Pan is out, it was tight but I did not have to lift the engine (thank heavens.

    Maybe I don’t know what I’m looking at but I think the timing gear and chain have been replaced with a new set. If true, that would be swell.

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  11. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    Look at the upper timing gear, if it is plastic, it is OEM. If it is metal, it is a replacement. That chain looks to be tight, so it is probably in good shape.

    Dave
     
  12. jason99

    jason99 Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    I did t realize only the upper was plastic on OEM. Looks like this is the OEM upper gear. Ugh.

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  13. jason99

    jason99 Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    New pan installed, much easier going in than removing. Out of time for tonight, but the steering will go back in tomorrow. Hopefully that’s easier back in than out as well. If all goes well I’ll be able to hit the road tomorrow and burn through a tank of gas before I consider what to fix next.
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  14. 3C's & a D?

    3C's & a D? Senior Member

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    Pan looks great! Original timing chain does too, considering it appears to be completely intact. Teeth will start cracking and falling off. Then the chain will skip, and you aren't going anywhere, and may have caused major damage to the engine. Ask me how I know. Definitely fix that next! It's the best preventative maintenance you can do. Take it easy until you do and you'll be fine. I see you have the new Milwaukee ratchet, how are you liking it?
     
  15. jason99

    jason99 Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    The power ratchet works well, but has obvious size and weight issues compared to a standard wrench. It’s nice when you are in an odd position and need fasteners undone/done quickly. I used it here entirely on the takedown and not at all on the install as there was a lot of holding things up while I unfastened.

    As for the timing chain, I just hope it’s something I can do myself without wrecking anything, but that’s for another thread once I get this going and collect my notes, tools, and parts for the timing set.
     
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  16. jason99

    jason99 Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Due to a lapse in attention to detail I installed the pan gasket flipped, which rendered the dipstick inoperable. Naturally I noticed this after I filled the oil, reinstalled the exhaust, and attached steering linkage. I figure the first attempt took me a total of 8hrs spread over multiple days. Doing it again now that I had all the required tools and had the process down only took me four hours. The car seems happy with fresh oil and a pan that isn’t smashed up. We will see how/if the Tennessee Gasket helps with leaks.

    This was definitely tougher than I thought, but could have been worse. If anyone else needs to do this, here are my thoughts about tools.

    Required:
    1/4in socket set & extensions
    1/4 universal joint sockets (for some of the front bolts obscured by the frame)
    3/8 or 1/2 in socket and long extension for getting at exhaust bolts from below
    A set of front end service tools. I ended up using the smallest u-shaped one and the adjustable claw style. If someone actually makes a good set of these I’m buying them because I nearly ruined the pullers from the cheap set I bought.
    Inch/Pound torque wrench
    Good eye protection

    Was nice to have:
    Air or electric impact and wrench. Made the pullers easier to use and saved time and energy on the second run through of everything.
    Quick jack
    Ramps

    Would have been nice to have, but didn’t have:
    A real lift (duh) for more space
    A buddy with some spare hands, eyes, ideas, and a brain. A second set of hands would have made the exhaust reattachment a ton easier than the assortment of blocks, jacks, and zip ties I used to hold things as just one guy. A second brain probably would have noticed my gasket mistake.

    My Chiltons says this should have taken two hours. Thank goodness this is not my profession.