A Few Fuel Pump Questions Before Installation

77newyorker440

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2020
Messages
511
Reaction score
277
Location
Peanut State, USA
Hey guys,
I have some questions for you all about the Carter Fuel Pump before I go ahead and install it.
1) Should the lever on one side of the pump move? Cause mine moves maybe 1/2 of a millimeter total with small force applied to it (I did not want to break it, just see if it moves).
2) Is there any prep work that needs to be done on the fuel pump before it is installed, or does it just bolt in?
3) Any key tips that I should keep in mind?
As always, thanks for your help!
77newyorker440
 

Davea Lux

Old Man with a Hat
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2017
Messages
8,919
Reaction score
8,074
Location
Cornelius Or
The lever is moved up and down by a drive rod that rums off the cam shaft. Take some gasket sealer and glue the gasket to the pump prior to installing it so that the gasket stays in place, makes the installation easier. (Some of the modern gaskets have a peel off adhesive strip on one side) On a big block the drive rod for the pump will usually slide out until it makes contact with the side of the casting, this makes trying to install the pump a PIA. Take and clean the oil off of the end of the drive rod, then coat the drive rod with some heavy grease and push it back into the casting, this will hold the rod in place so that the pump lever can be properly aligned under the drive rod. You may need to rotate the engine by hand to get the drive rod fully seated, you want the drive rod retracted so that it is not applying pressure to the pump lever. If the pump lever is in its proper position, the pump should fit tight against the mount without resistance. Install the outer bolt first while holding the pump in the upright position, once that bolt is started, install the inner bolt again while holding the pump upright. With both bolts started, tighten as per the FSM. Replace the fuel filter, check the condition of the inlet rubber hose, if it is cracked or hard, replace it. When all of this is complete, have a helper start the car and check for leaks.

Dave
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2019
Messages
119
Reaction score
100
Location
Berwick, PA
I'm sure others here know a lot more about this than I do, but in my experience, you need to replace the push rod that actuates the pump, you need to lube both ends of the push rod with grease or assembly lube, and you should try to prime the pump from a plastic bottle or something before connecting it to your fuel tank or it could take a lot of cranking to get it to pump.
 

413

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2019
Messages
1,228
Reaction score
1,315
Location
NW USA
Don’t replace a good pump push rod with a pice of junk sold today. The old ones are generally better.
 

CBODY67

Old Man with a Hat
Joined
Mar 27, 2011
Messages
7,283
Reaction score
4,442
For general principles, inspect the existing push rod and compare that measurement to other threads on the subject in here. Some sort of assembly lube on the cam end is your friend.

Just some thoughts,
CBODY67
 

Gerald Morris

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2016
Messages
2,000
Reaction score
997
Location
Tucson
Don’t replace a good pump push rod with a pice of junk sold today. The old ones are generally better.

WISE WORDS! Total agreement. The pushrods in the motors I've replaced fuel pumps on were all fine, though I concede they could wear out of spec eventually. Cast pot-metal and cans will do so FAR more rapidly. Don't buy new made junk parts!
 

Gerald Morris

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2016
Messages
2,000
Reaction score
997
Location
Tucson
I'm sure others here know a lot more about this than I do, but in my experience, you need to replace the push rod that actuates the pump, you need to lube both ends of the push rod with grease or assembly lube, and you should try to prime the pump from a plastic bottle or something before connecting it to your fuel tank or it could take a lot of cranking to get it to pump.

Naa, man you're overkilling this relatively simple procedure. If you're quick with your fingers, you can even scoot the rod up, hold it in place with a thin flat blade screwdriver, then drop the fuel pump into the hole, starting it in enough to block the rod from dropping too far down, then withdrawing your screwdriver. I've done this, and/or used a dab of Lubriplate bearing grease to stick the rod up.

Likewise, if you deftly turn the end of your fuel line UP, and/or pinch it shut to avoid spilling much of the petrol in the line, you won't need to prime the pump, though there's nothing WRONG with pump priming as a rule....

Don't make this stuff harder on yourself than you need to. Look at your problems, think out every step from first to last BEFORE you touch a wrench, then proceed. Have at least a couple alternative plans for when your first one goes wrong a bit. That way, you keep your sanity if not your savings account, as my recent ordeal this autumn shows.
 

NewportRbod

Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2015
Messages
56
Reaction score
16
Location
Michigan
The lever is moved up and down by a drive rod that rums off the cam shaft. Take some gasket sealer and glue the gasket to the pump prior to installing it so that the gasket stays in place, makes the installation easier. (Some of the modern gaskets have a peel off adhesive strip on one side) On a big block the drive rod for the pump will usually slide out until it makes contact with the side of the casting, this makes trying to install the pump a PIA. Take and clean the oil off of the end of the drive rod, then coat the drive rod with some heavy grease and push it back into the casting, this will hold the rod in place so that the pump lever can be properly aligned under the drive rod. You may need to rotate the engine by hand to get the drive rod fully seated, you want the drive rod retracted so that it is not applying pressure to the pump lever. If the pump lever is in its proper position, the pump should fit tight against the mount without resistance. Install the outer bolt first while holding the pump in the upright position, once that bolt is started, install the inner bolt again while holding the pump upright. With both bolts started, tighten as per the FSM. Replace the fuel filter, check the condition of the inlet rubber hose, if it is cracked or hard, replace it. When all of this is complete, have a helper start the car and check for leaks.

Dave
Well said! The last fuel pump I did I put gasket goo on one side of the gasket. My son gave me a funny look and asked if I knew there was a peel off protective strip? I guess he was watching all those years.
 

413

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2019
Messages
1,228
Reaction score
1,315
Location
NW USA
Naa, man you're overkilling this relatively simple procedure. If you're quick with your fingers, you can even scoot the rod up, hold it in place with a thin flat blade screwdriver, then drop the fuel pump into the hole, starting it in enough to block the rod from dropping too far down, then withdrawing your screwdriver. I've done this, and/or used a dab of Lubriplate bearing grease to stick the rod up.

Likewise, if you deftly turn the end of your fuel line UP, and/or pinch it shut to avoid spilling much of the petrol in the line, you won't need to prime the pump, though there's nothing WRONG with pump priming as a rule....

Don't make this stuff harder on yourself than you need to. Look at your problems, think out every step from first to last BEFORE you touch a wrench, then proceed. Have at least a couple alternative plans for when your first one goes wrong a bit. That way, you keep your sanity if not your savings account, as my recent ordeal this autumn shows.
Man you have had an ordeal for sure. Enjoy your posts!
 

Gerald Morris

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2016
Messages
2,000
Reaction score
997
Location
Tucson
Man you have had an ordeal for sure. Enjoy your posts!

Very true! Am now addressing the brake booster problem. I removed it, replaced the MC with the Bendix clone from Mathilda, but, sure as shit, the pedal pivot for brake booster systems is FURTHER from the piston/booster rod, resulting in a WEAKER moment arm for pressing the piston directly. I CAN remove the plate and pedal from Mathilda, and might well do so, post-Christmas, as braking manually with the booster adapted pedal/plate requires a LOT of muscle!

IFF I can find a GOOD rebuilt booster, I'll just put that in, and happily run around with boosted brakes until I get more time/motivation to properly effect the conversion. I HATE ripping that stuff out of Mathilda too, but might HAVE TO. I've been blessed with a very flexible body, but working extensively under the steering wheel and dash WEARS ME OUT HARD! Still, I know NOW, EXACTLY what to do under there, so if I must, then I'll effect the change. If I can find another manual plate and pedal combo, for a reasonable price, THAT might be preferable to a rebuild booster too. Told the Babushka that I'll shop carefully, and get us something ASAP. THEN, its on to changing those rear springs!

"The Torture never Stops" --Francisco Zappa, ca 1975
 
Top