And so it begins: Window motor repair!

Isaiah Estrada

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Work on the 2DHT New Yorker has been off and on for the last few months and it’s quite unfortunate that it’s just been sitting waiting to be wrenched on once again. Going on 42 years now that this beast hasn’t ran! Had a dream about it running last night… hopefully a sign of what’s soon to come :steering:

5113E79B-1712-44A3-861D-293890319CF2.jpeg


We’ve been working on the car a bit more intensely lately, as the annual West Coast Kustoms Cruisin’ Nationals is to take place late in May (Memorial Day weekend.) if you haven’t heard of the show, I highly recommend checking it out. It’s taken place since the early / mid 80s originally started by Rich Pichette and his wife Penny. Many greats of the Kustom world have been involved with the show such as Bill Hines, George Barris and Gene Winfield. Big inspirations to me, especially with this C Body build. I know to some I’m “ruining” this car, but hey - it would’ve sat rotting even further had my 18 year old self hadn’t seen it and said “Oh yeah, that’s the one I NEED!” :lol:

Unlike most of the images many of you may have in your head about a C Body “lowrider” - this one isn’t what you think exactly. No 13” reverse wheels, high lockup, mural paint job etc etc. I’m actually very inspired by the works of Hot Rodders and Kustomizers who worked with the idea that “Less is More!” My car will lay low on 15 x 7 Cragar SS wheels and thin whites. Retain all the gorgeous stainless rocker trim but polished out to a chrome reflection. I may shave door handles to accentuate the aggressive and beautiful body lines and concave slab sides that really make the 68 such a special car. A deep dark red metallic is the planned color with a light metal flake. My vision is to have the body and lines of the car speak for itself. As for being lowered, the lower rocker moulding will reflect the ground the car sits over giving the illusion that it’s “floating”, and it’s lowered stance will give the illusion that the car is even longer! I can only say so much in words - but I can’t wait to show everyone the final result.

For now, we’ve replaced the trunk so far.

F140B0F5-250D-4099-8455-01C86DCFB00E.jpeg


Going to be working from the rear forward. Lots of metal repair needs to be done but it’s mostly in the rear area. Some places on the roof that need attention. Namely under the drip rail which brings me to my current endeavor with the car. This New Yorker is highly optioned, power windows AND vent windows. Only problem is, they’ve sat for 40+ years and without any power to them. I need to roll the rear window down to get access to the screws holding the trim in place underneath the weather stripping. To do that obviously I have to remove the motor / regulator assembly because the motors are frozen. Thanks to the good folks on the forum AND Facebook I was able to tackle my very first one! Now 3 more to go…

4F5E535F-4B6E-4802-ABCC-F9BE6E106B6D.jpeg


Crazy to think that these windows haven’t budged in almost half a century… or anything working on this car really! Moving forward we will tackle the firewall and prime it, block it then sand it for paint… finally then we can drop in that rebuilt 440 that’s sat in the corner for over a year now. Can’t wait to keep y’all updated with the masted latest on this car. It’s going to be an awesome journey!
 

Big_John

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Work on the 2DHT New Yorker has been off and on for the last few months and it’s quite unfortunate that it’s just been sitting waiting to be wrenched on once again. Going on 42 years now that this beast hasn’t ran! Had a dream about it running last night… hopefully a sign of what’s soon to come :steering:

View attachment 515735

We’ve been working on the car a bit more intensely lately, as the annual West Coast Kustoms Cruisin’ Nationals is to take place late in May (Memorial Day weekend.) if you haven’t heard of the show, I highly recommend checking it out. It’s taken place since the early / mid 80s originally started by Rich Pichette and his wife Penny. Many greats of the Kustom world have been involved with the show such as Bill Hines, George Barris and Gene Winfield. Big inspirations to me, especially with this C Body build. I know to some I’m “ruining” this car, but hey - it would’ve sat rotting even further had my 18 year old self hadn’t seen it and said “Oh yeah, that’s the one I NEED!” :lol:

Unlike most of the images many of you may have in your head about a C Body “lowrider” - this one isn’t what you think exactly. No 13” reverse wheels, high lockup, mural paint job etc etc. I’m actually very inspired by the works of Hot Rodders and Kustomizers who worked with the idea that “Less is More!” My car will lay low on 15 x 7 Cragar SS wheels and thin whites. Retain all the gorgeous stainless rocker trim but polished out to a chrome reflection. I may shave door handles to accentuate the aggressive and beautiful body lines and concave slab sides that really make the 68 such a special car. A deep dark red metallic is the planned color with a light metal flake. My vision is to have the body and lines of the car speak for itself. As for being lowered, the lower rocker moulding will reflect the ground the car sits over giving the illusion that it’s “floating”, and it’s lowered stance will give the illusion that the car is even longer! I can only say so much in words - but I can’t wait to show everyone the final result.

For now, we’ve replaced the trunk so far.

View attachment 515736

Going to be working from the rear forward. Lots of metal repair needs to be done but it’s mostly in the rear area. Some places on the roof that need attention. Namely under the drip rail which brings me to my current endeavor with the car. This New Yorker is highly optioned, power windows AND vent windows. Only problem is, they’ve sat for 40+ years and without any power to them. I need to roll the rear window down to get access to the screws holding the trim in place underneath the weather stripping. To do that obviously I have to remove the motor / regulator assembly because the motors are frozen. Thanks to the good folks on the forum AND Facebook I was able to tackle my very first one! Now 3 more to go…

View attachment 515737

Crazy to think that these windows haven’t budged in almost half a century… or anything working on this car really! Moving forward we will tackle the firewall and prime it, block it then sand it for paint… finally then we can drop in that rebuilt 440 that’s sat in the corner for over a year now. Can’t wait to keep y’all updated with the masted latest on this car. It’s going to be an awesome journey!
Great work!

A little warning... The spring on the regulator is put there to chop your finger off. Search on here and there's several ways to make it safe to take it apart. Usually a bolt and nut through a drilled hole, or at minimum, a clamp.

Even if it didn't hurt you (and I'm serious about losing a finger) putting the spring back in place is a very difficult task.
 

Isaiah Estrada

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I find it very enjoyable to read your updates. You certainly have a very clear vision of how you want this car to look and must have dreamed (day dreamed) about it almost constantly. Keep at it.
Thank you, that truly means a lot! I definitely do have a vision for this car and that’s what keeps me going. Sometimes it gets a little overwhelming but I am not the kind to give up. Sometimes I’ve wanted to but in the end I know all this hard work will pay off when I have one awesome car to drive around!

Very nice! Looking forward to the finished product!
Thank you! Looking forward to sharing it with you all :thankyou:
 

Isaiah Estrada

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Great work!

A little warning... The spring on the regulator is put there to chop your finger off. Search on here and there's several ways to make it safe to take it apart. Usually a bolt and nut through a drilled hole, or at minimum, a clamp.

Even if it didn't hurt you (and I'm serious about losing a finger) putting the spring back in place is a very difficult task.

Here's my thread on repairing power vents.

Power Vent Motor- Anyone ever take one apart??

This repairs a newer window motor with the roller clutch, but it will show you a few things.

How to rebuild Chrysler Power Window motor clutch assembly

Thanks Big John!! The whole finger chopping off thing was what held me from tackling this job a lot later than I would’ve :lol:

After looking over the FSM multiple times and asking those who’ve done the job before I finally realized where that spring was and what the best way to remove the motor / assembly was. I’ll definitely be looking into those threads, in fact I had those in particular saved too! Good to know I’m on the right track. I plan on taking out the entire vent window frame for easy access to the motor. Will be reporting my results in the future when I have everything cleaned up and (hopefully) in working order.
 
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