antifreeze or no- long term storage...

Early C Bodies - The Slab Side Years

  1. Rosco

    Rosco Member

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    Well, that's pretty much my question.
    I have a '68 Fury that's sat for too long that I've started to resuscitate. In the process of my restoration I've been completely derailed (timing chain cover issues, virus bs, homeschooling duties and a plethora of other distractions) and have had to put the whole thing on hold. I don't live full time where the Fury does (Mexico) and need to make some decisions...
    At this point I have the timing chain cover off, valve covers off, radiator and gas tank out. My dilemma is that I only have precious, little time to put it back together and no time to use/enjoy it.
    With the time I have left my thoughts are to install the gas tank, radiator, timing chain cover and associated parts and then put her to bed until the next time I'll be able to work on her, next January (at the earliest). All the fluids have been drained, the gas tank I'll be installing is brand new as well as the radiator. How far should I take this thing? My thoughts are not to put any gas into it- no point just to run it for a short time and then have it sit and on the same note, do I bother putting any antifreeze back in just to have it sit for 9 or 10 months?
    The gas question I am not struggling with-I don't want to put any fuel into it until I'm ready to drive it, but I don't know if it's better to store the thing with antifreeze in (to perhaps prevent corrosion) or not since many parts are new and have never seen liquid (radiator, water pump, t-stat housing/t-stat and all the hoses).
    I have not drained the block via the block drains as I was afraid of stripping them or breaking them since they have never been removed but I did obviously pull all the hoses (heater hoses, too), w/p, radiator, etc. Btw, the new radiator is aluminum.
    Not sure how to proceed.
    Too, I have heard to always store a gas tank full to prevent condensation. Would that concept apply to one that has no liquid in it, ie new? Maybe I should be thinking about filling the gas tank up for storage as well?? The Fury is in a warm climate.
     
  2. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    Leave the gas tank empty, the moonshine blends will degrade before you work on it in Jan. If the engine has the hoses off and the cooling system open to the atmosphere, you need to pull the block drains. If you don't, there is a good chance that anti-freeze already in the system will jell/sludge up and be a major PIA to clean out. Since you do not know the condition of the head gaskets, it will be better to leave the cooling system dry once it is empty. That way you do not have to worry about a coolant leak into a cylinder that will trash your engine while you are away.

    Dave
     
  3. Rosco

    Rosco Member

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    Hey Dave, thanks for the reply.
    Do you think we should be concerned about condensation in the empty tank?? Too, I will be able to get the cooling system installed completely- all hoses installed. So, no concern regarding internal corrosion w/out the antifreeze?
    thanks
     
  4. Rosco

    Rosco Member

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    Also, maybe I should mention that the tank in my car is vented.
     
  5. Rosco

    Rosco Member

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    I guess you stated your opinion on the condensation issue "Leave the gas tank empty" so I've been hoping to get some more input from others. But, any reason condensation wouldn't occur in the tank under the right conditions (ie temp./humidity) or do you think the whole condensation issue is an old wives' tale? I've never personally had this issue even with my Fury which sits every year for at least 8 months at a time.
     
  6. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    I'd pull the drains out of the block and call it a day.

    You'll want to drain that all out before you put new stuff in anyway... I had to look up where Todos Santos is and I guess you don't get freezing weather in Mexico, so the worry of waking up to cracked block (been there) is minimal. So... It wouldn't be a bad idea to flush it out with running water and leave it all open to drain and dry. If you do get freezing weather, then skip the flush until you are ready to get it running.
     
  7. 413

    413 Well-Known Member

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    What do you usually use in the radiator on an old car?

    What do you put in the radiator to prevent rust?
     
  8. Rosco

    Rosco Member

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    Correct, no freezing temps ever down here. There's an island called Todos Santos up near Ensenada. We're in the town down at the tip of the Baja peninsula about an hour north of Cabo, right on the tropic of Cancer.
    As far as "draining and drying" I was planning to re-install the timing chain cover, water pump, t-stat and new housing and all the hoses. In that case do you think the engine would be ok or would you suggest leaving all that stuff off to allow the block to dry? I will pull the block drains and flush with water first.
    In my case it would be better to have the parts bolted onto the vehicle vs. storing them down here due to the possibility of theft.
     
  9. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    In a warm climate like Mexico, condensation in the fuel tank is not going to be much of a problem. Putting fuel in it is far more likely to cause problems. Putting the engine back together is a better choice because of the theft issues and a together engine is much less likely to have rodents building nests inside. The block will dry out quickly once all the fluid is drained. Be sure to put the radiator cap back on as mice will build nests in the top of the radiator. Putting a shop rag in the air cleaner keeps critters out also. Also be sure that the oil filler cap is on the engine to keep critters out of the valve cover.

    Dave
     
  10. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    The block will dry out eventually. I'd go ahead and bolt everything together. Any water left is minimal and not going to hurt anything.
     
  11. Rosco

    Rosco Member

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    ahh, VERY good point about critters...I'll have a block bolted over the intake as I usually remove the carb. each year and fill the float w/ wd40 and will
    I sure don't want to put gas in for the very reason you stated but am concerned about the condensation issue as we hit dew point almost every night over here in Todos. The Fury is actually stored over on the gulf side (part of my issue with not being able to spend as much time as I would have liked to working on it) which is typically much, much warmer- we get a marine climate on the Pacific side in fact lately have had fog every morning.
    I'll look into dew-point on the other side where the car is. Maybe there's something to put into the tank (other than gas) to prevent or minimize the effect of any possible condensation?
     
  12. Rosco

    Rosco Member

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    I think we have a plan.
    Just curious, why do you think it's better to store the engine w/out antifreeze? Is it because the antifreeze will be deteriorating and the effects from that are worse than none at all?
     
  13. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    IMHO, it doesn't make too much difference. I just think if you are going to put fresh antifreeze in it, then take out the old.

    I prefer that there is no liquids in a stored engine. I guess it's from years of moving stuff around and having it spill.
     
  14. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    If you block off the vent and put on a non-vented cap, air can not circulate and there will be no condensation.

    Dave
     
  15. Rosco

    Rosco Member

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    I will try this. I think my normal cap is not vented since the tank is.
    thanks.
     
  16. Rosco

    Rosco Member

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    I agree. A fresh start.
     
  17. HWYCRZR

    HWYCRZR Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Condensation inside a semi closed system like your gas tank isn’t going to happen in that climate. Condensation happens when there is a big air temperature differential between inside and outside. This is much more rampant going from freezing to non freezing. The ventilation in your tank isn’t direct air entry ( most vents have a few loops or bends to get a natural air lock that is overcome by fuel suction from the pump or expansion of air / fumes on a hot day) so the likely hood of getting damp air inside the tank from a morning fog would be highly unlikely.
     
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  18. Rosco

    Rosco Member

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    thanks for the clarification and re-assurance. A little research on the town where I'm storing my car and I came up with there is fog for maybe a few days a year- we should be good.
     
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