Avoid IN-Line Tube

c-barge

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Their manual drum brake lines I installed on my '70 GT fit well.. that is.. all but the rear axle line. The T-block junction was in the wrong spot with their lines. Easy fix shortening the drivers side but had to bend up a whole new line for the passenger side.

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Also this flair tool is fantastic to use. It only does 3/16th line but they come out perfect every time.

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Big_John

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rapidtrans

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As a possible defense of Inlinetubes, they are located in Michigan after all. All businesses here suffer from lack of help. The virus seems to have excused poor service and attitudes everywhere. The unemployment extensions and all the government hand-outs just ended last month. I live maybe six miles from Inlinetubes and was used to just dropping in to pick up items. Now they only ship because they can’t staff a front desk.
 

Ripinator

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As a possible defense of Inlinetubes, they are located in Michigan after all. All businesses here suffer from lack of help. The virus seems to have excused poor service and attitudes everywhere. The unemployment extensions and all the government hand-outs just ended last month. I live maybe six miles from Inlinetubes and was used to just dropping in to pick up items. Now they only ship because they can’t staff a front desk.

I must agree. I have done business with Inline Tube several times over the last few years, and the brake lines and other items I received were of first rate quality and fit. Of course, this was pre-covid.

I am currently installing the main brake line (and mounting clips I couldn't find anywhere else) that runs from the front to the rear of my '66 300 coupe. I also recently installed their double line kit (including a dual split fitting) they supplied for the dual master cylinder conversion on the same car.

Two years ago I bought / (mechanic-installed) a complete stainless brake line kit for my 95 Chevy 9C1 police Caprice. It is beautiful.

So. . . Lighten up on Inline Tube everybody. . .
 

cantflip

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I must agree. I have done business with Inline Tube several times over the last few years, and the brake lines and other items I received were of first rate quality and fit. Of course, this was pre-covid.

I am currently installing the main brake line (and mounting clips I couldn't find anywhere else) that runs from the front to the rear of my '66 300 coupe. I also recently installed their double line kit (including a dual split fitting) they supplied for the dual master cylinder conversion on the same car.

Two years ago I bought / (mechanic-installed) a complete stainless brake line kit for my 95 Chevy 9C1 police Caprice. It is beautiful.

So. . . Lighten up on Inline Tube everybody. . .
Sorry buddy, I will always advocate making your own... except maybe for stainless, which I have little use for except fuel lines (ethanol).
 

tbm3fan

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I did all of my own lines. For the brakes I used Ni-Cop. That stuff is wonderful to work with. I just used plain steel for the fuel line since she stays in doors when the weather is bad. I don't have any fancy tools. Got creative and took my time.

I use the same material for my lines also. One thing I have found is that for me to make a flare that doesn't leak, and I have had four of those on my truck, has a lot to do with the tool that cuts the line. Of the two I have one tool was responsible for all the leaky lines even though it did have two that worked. The other cutter did a better job once I figured it out through a lot of trial and error. Ironically it was the cheap plastic tool that was best. I may have to make some in plain steel to see if a similar effect. For flares I use the Eastwood kit.
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BLIMP

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Coincidentally I happen to be making a small fitting for a fuel pump using a vintage flaring kit purchased at a flea market for $10...pretty easy stuff if a simpleton like myself can do it.
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Big_John

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They can be bought individually from snapon... and aren't required for the low pressure fuel line he's making.
While I agree it's a lot less pressure, I think the double flare is really used to prevent cracking from stress of the tube vibrating and moving at the fitting. I think it also seals better as it's a more stable flare.

You can get away with it, I'm sure, but everything I've seen from the factory for fuel line is double flare. That's the way I've done it and will continue to. I had a gas fire once from a bad line. While I had an extinguisher, the damage from the fire was nil. The powder from the extinguisher made a huge mess and ruined the finish on my Holley carbs.
 

commando1

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Two types of flare:
The 45-degree double flare tool will obviously see the most use, as it can be used for repairs on all sorts of vehicles, but if you are even remotely considering AN brake hoses or a fuel system with AN fittings, grab that 37-degree flare tool

Double flares are necessary for brake lines due to the high pressures inflicted on them by the hydraulic system. Single flared lines are only appropriate for low-pressure lines due to their tendency to crack or leak. The brake system cannot afford to have a leak in the lines since this can cause serious injury or death if the brakes fail.

The Department of Transportation outlawed single flared brake lines, which means that you shouldn’t install them on your vehicle even if you wanted to.

But what do I know. I stole all of the above crap from the web.

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chippers65300

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Yes I have. Same old song and dance. Send my originals in and we will duplicate them. Last time I did that it took 2 months. Not sending my originals to them.
 
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