1. 1970FuryConv

    1970FuryConv Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Was using my old 6" gap Columbian bench vise to install new wheel studs on my left side 8.75 axle shaft. I hit the anvil side with a 3 pound hammer when the wheel stud hangs up in the shaft's flange and then turn the tightening bar some more. After many years of use, my Columbian vise wore out/stripped out internally and no longer tightened.

    Need to buy another vise. Anyone got a rec on a 6" gap vise that can take the punishment?
    Did right side 1st
    20190423_170603.jpg
     
  2. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Whatever you do, do not buy one from HF, very brittle. Gave up on them after the 2nd one broke and found a really old one at a pawn shop for $25.

    Dave
     
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  3. C Body Bob

    C Body Bob Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    728B4E39-08D9-463B-8246-93D47B8BC823.jpeg You ever try a Lisle wheel stud installer. Got mine off Amazon. Quick & easy. Sometimes depending on the studs shoulder you may have to use a couple washers.
     
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  4. rkrochen

    rkrochen Active Member

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    In a pinch I have used larger nuts to accomplish the same thing.
     
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  5. bajajoaquin

    bajajoaquin Senior Member

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    You will be hard pressed to find a reasonably priced vise that can take a beating like that Columbian. Those were frequently cast steel. Most buses are cast iron and not designed to take more than the occasional blow to straighten something relatively light.

    I’m not sure anyone is making cast steel vises any longer (blacksmiths’ leg vises excepted).
     
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  6. 78Brougham

    78Brougham Deplorable FCBO Gold Member

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    Wilton, one of the best but they aren't cheap.
    Just remember... Good tools aren't cheap and cheap tools aren't good.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2019
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  7. detmatt

    detmatt Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    Well said!:thumbsup:
     
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  8. 1978 NYB

    1978 NYB Warfighter FCBO Gold Member

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    Wilson or Yost for a quality vise. A lot of choices on the internet.
     
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  9. 78Brougham

    78Brougham Deplorable FCBO Gold Member

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    Wilton.... damned auto correct... LOL
     
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  10. BigblueC

    BigblueC Well-Known Member

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    As said above, a good new vice won't be cheap. So with that I ask what exactly is broken in yours and could it be repaired/replaced?
     
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  11. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Senior Member

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    Here a tip, quit using your vice for a press.
     
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  12. 1970FuryConv

    1970FuryConv Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Since the vise is already broken, and I have to buy something or repair mine, what do you suggest?
     
  13. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Senior Member

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    I think I know what your doing wrong but I got to run out to the store so stay tuned.
     
  14. 78Brougham

    78Brougham Deplorable FCBO Gold Member

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    "Here's a tip, quit using your vice as a press"
    Who amongst us hasn't done that? :rofl:
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2019
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  15. rags

    rags Well-Known Member

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    the spindle nut in that vise might be replaceable. in a pinch there's threaded rod and a coupler nut. just grease it good.
     
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  16. 78Brougham

    78Brougham Deplorable FCBO Gold Member

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    Ummmm you better take a closer look at the picture.... :rofl: 2/3rd's of the jaw is missing. Little more than a spindle nut that needs repaired...
     
  17. bajajoaquin

    bajajoaquin Senior Member

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    I think Wiltons are cast iron as well. Nice vises, but still not meant to beat on.
     
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  18. rags

    rags Well-Known Member

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    i dd. it appears that the jaw was cut that way. i also read his post. he said the vise is wore out/stripped out internally and can no longer tightened. that's what i referring to.
     
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  19. BigblueC

    BigblueC Well-Known Member

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    He just needs a little
    upload_2019-4-27_15-29-2.png
     
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  20. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Senior Member

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    First off what I think you have for a vice is a carpenters vice or what is called a 'Tradesmans" vice. What you should have is a 'Machinists' vice, much more beefier & tougher.

    Notice this part in yours vs. the vice I use to have & use.

    CARPENTER.VICE.LRG.jpg

    COLOMBIAN.MACHINST.VICE.jpg
    The machined square section keeps the jaw alignment and pressing forces more uumm aligned. lol It's just a beefier piece of equipment for clamping heavy metal parts other than wood or pipe as in a tradesman situation (think plumber)

    I use to just wack the studs out with a proper sized ball peen hammer, not the biggest sized ball peen in the box but one size down from the largest, more or less the everyday hammer you grab for. One heavy first wack then 2 light taps and the stud is out. Same as putting them back in, any more than that will require some pressing forces. Swagged front drums is different and should be dropped off at your friendly machine shop if you want to keep that result.

    Now most of what I've had to deal with has only been 2 to 4 years off the assembly line and your (I guess) dealing with 40/50 years of who knows what/who ass monkey garage has had their mitts on this. What I'm saying is that you don't need a lot of pressure to put the stud in, the press fit is only to keep the stud from pushing back when you install the wheel. The press fit is not to keep the stud from spinning during loosening or tightening, that is the job of the splines. What happens is that when someone installs a stud is that they don't 'Feel' for the spline to align and just press or hammer the hell out of it jamming it in for good. Next removal can be a pain.

    When you remove the stud get out your glasses & trouble light and check to see how clean & crisp the splines are. If they are all mashed someone f'ed it up.
    Now whether the splines are mashed or crisp when you go to install the new stud rotate it with your fingers to feel the spline engage and sit down a little in the spline, then with a few wacks with a proper hammer, again first heavy wack to get it going, then a couple of lighter wacks to finally seat it. Hammering skills take years too learn. I can still remember my instructor in blacksmith class going on about beating on metal whether hot or cold on the anvil with a blacksmith hammer to move the hammer to the side and let it bounce twice before taking another swing. And something about the 'Ring' and that wood handles absorb the shock better. I can't remember to this day why the bounce was important, but it seemed to work.

    Now this is all fine and dandy when you have the axle/hub out of the vehicle but when your doing this in the field (think heavy equipment) you need a little pressing help as you can't hammer it in due to it's installed position so some will have washers or a collar and pull the stud in with a nut and air wrench. Or you can use your ball/u-joint portable press for large tough ones. Again get to feel the splines engage before preceding.

    3 in 1 Ball Joint U-Joint C-Frame Press Service Anchor Pin Kit Auto Repair.jpg

    U Joint Press.jpg

    Snap-On Ball Joint Press Master Set.jpg

    With a variety of collars and adapters these presses can be adapted to many other uses.

    Examples:
    Yes
    U-JOINT.PRESS.&.VICE.jpg

    Yes
    U-JOINT.PRESS.&.BENCH.jpg

    NOOOOOO!
    U-JOINT.PRESS.WRONG.001.jpg

    Notice sledge hammer! :eek:
     
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