Burnouts

RagTop66

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Ok, so I know that some people find burnouts useless, dumb, pointless, and a waste of money, but they bring a smile to my face. I don’t plan on frying my tires regularly, but I do want to be able to do a burnout whenever I want to. Problem is, that I’m not able to right now. I feel pretty strongly that something isn’t set up right, so if anyone can give me an idea of what I should adjust, I’d greatly appreciate it. If you’re in the “anti-burnout” group, please just ignore this thread unless you have advice that will help me achieve burnouts whenever and wherever I want to.

I have a 1966 Dodge Polara 500 convertible. It has a freshly rebuilt (approx. 1500 miles ago) 440. I have a 484 purple shaft Mopar performance cam, 906 heads, edelbrock 7193 intake, Holley 625 demon carb, B&M 2,000 stall converter and electronic ignition with an aftermarket orange box.
First off, I know that’s a mishmash of different parts, so if something is way out of line, feel free to let me know.

Thanks in advance!

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LocuMob

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Have a 2.76 gear in the rear end? That may make the car feel sluggish when trying to get the tire(s) to spin.
 

detmatt

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Are you wanting to do what we used to refer to as a brake torque or are you just standing on it from a dead stop without loading up the brakes? 4 wheel drums? That car should be able to get those tires roasting even with the stock range of that torque converter.
Try it with wet pavement.
 

Dsertdog

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Highway gears, heavy car, and the factory converter are burnout buzzkills for sure. A 2000 stall converter isn't much of an improvement.
Try this test, but not too many times.
With the car at running temp, hold the brakes to the floor. With the car in drive, Floor the engine and watch your tach. The engine will either lug down, or try to crawl off the brakes. Whatever the rpm is at that moment is your true stall speed.
The factory convertor is pretty "tight" meaning it stalls right off curb idle. Off idle is about 1000 to 1500 rpm. 2000 stall convertors may not stall at much more than that.
With all those cubes, mild cam and small carb, you should make plenty of power for tire smoking antics.
Try maxing out your tire pressure in your rear tires and adjust your rear brakes a bit looser.
You could always install a line lock, some guys even put a washer pump/bottle and lines in the trunk to spray the tires with water.
There's a bit of technique here as well to find the sweet spot where torque overcomes brake shoes/tire traction.
Guys that appear to be good at rolling smoke have the power, setup, and technique mastered.
 

Dsertdog

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I think I'll add these thoughts as well...
Burnouts can become addictive. You say just a couple, but then you do a couple more...then some punk in a noisy 5.0 stang says you can't, and you proceed to blot out the sun...
I'd recommend replacing your 55 year old driveshaft with something new.
Even a driveshaft loop, because a broken front joint can turn your car into a pole vaulter. Or worse.
Just thoughts from someone who's been there/done that.
 

71Polara383

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I've made 318-2bbl cars with 2.76 gears fry the tire.

You can't ease into it. Lightly press on the brake pedal, then mash the gas pedal to the floor. One quick "smack"
 

RagTop66

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Are you wanting to do what we used to refer to as a brake torque or are you just standing on it from a dead stop without loading up the brakes? 4 wheel drums? That car should be able to get those tires roasting even with the stock range of that torque converter.
Try it with wet pavement.
It is 4 wheel drums. I can do one on wet pavement pretty easily, but not on dry pavement. Usually, I hold the brake and then accelerate but nothing really happens.
 
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71Polara383

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It is 4 wheel drums. I can do one on wet pavement pretty easily, but not on dry pavement. Usually, I hold the brake and then accelerate but nothing really happens.
Maybe don't hold the brake as hard.

Sounds like the rear drums are adjusted tight.
 

71Polara383

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Forget you set the parking brake and drive 3 miles like I did. That'll loosen them up quite a bit :rolleyes:

Don't mash the brakes as hard as you are.

Go outside now and try to be easier on the brake pedal and harder on the gas pedal.:steering:
 

RagTop66

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Forget you set the parking brake and drive 3 miles like I did. That'll loosen them up quite a bit :rolleyes:

Don't mash the brakes as hard as you are.

Go outside now and try to be easier on the brake pedal and harder on the gas pedal.:steering:
I’ll try to be easier on the brakes next time I’m out.
 

71Polara383

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Also adjust timing until it pings, then back it off a touch.

If you are retarded (like me) you will have weak low end power and it'll all be top end.
 

Mike66Chryslers

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Is your vacuum advance connected to ported vacuum or constant vaccum from your carb? Ensure it is connect to ported vacuum so there is no vacuum advance at idle, and increase your initial advance using a vacuum gauge to get the highest vacuum reading. Your idle speed will increase so you need to turn that down as you go. Back the timing off a few degrees from this point. You will have a smooth idle and as much power at idle as is possible with this setting.

Depending on your engine setup, the initial advance may be so far advanced that you'll have hot start problems due to kickback, forcing you to back off the timing initial. You will also need to re-check your all-in (high RPM) mechanical advance and may need to adjust your distributor internals to reduce the mechanical advance travel, to keep the all-in timing at or under 36*.
 

USSMOPAR

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Line lock!!!!
Set it up so it blocks the rear line and you use the brake pedal to hold the car. Makes for safe rolling burnouts aka John Force my hero!
 

Turboomni

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What's your base timing and what is it all in and when? What's the rear tire size?
You should be able to roast them with ease with your new engine.
 
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