D-Day 75 years later

Newport 66

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On June 6th, 1944 the allies undertook the greatest amphibian troop movement in history. An event that completely turned WWII towards Allied Forces victory in the European theater of war. We shall be forever grateful to the thousands of troops that sacrificed life and limb to defend our way of life. We will never forget and forever be grateful to the soldiers that fought the great fight.
On a personal note, my Dad fought in WWII and was always the consummate proud American. It was fitting that he died on June 6th. I'm sure many here have Grandfathers and or Fathers that saw action in WWII. If they're alive thank them for their service and sacrifice. If they've passed, honor their memory by taking the time to remember all they did for all nations of the world.
 

CanCritter

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Wonderwagon

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My Father went in D-day plus one, fought through Europe and the Battle of the Bulge. That's all he ever said.
 

rkrochen

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My father was the same and he was there on D Day but was very reluctant to discuss it. Luckily I was able to confide a bit with him on this and then he opened up a little more to our son however it was very seldom.
We as a society are now realizing how drastically this affected the men and women who were there. Sadly it stayed with him all his life and died with it pented up all those years later.
 

rexus31

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I have much respect for the Greatest Generation especially those who served/fought in WWII.

About 10 years ago I scheduled to have my chimney cleaned. To my surprise, the business owner, an elderly gentleman showed up to perform the work. He noticed the picture of my mom next to a P-51 Mustang on my mantle and humbly mentioned he flew them in WWII over Europe providing fighter escort for B-17's and B-24's. I was in awe; a real life fighter pilot/WWII hero in my home. After thanking him for his service, I asked him a few questions. He started to tear up and said, "I'm sorry, I really don't like to talk about it much." Some 65 years later and the scars were still with him.
 

1978 NYB

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I was deployed 15.5 years out of the 20 years I was in the Army. I was stationed in Augsburg, Germany from 1984-1992 nonstop except for 1990-1991 when I was in the Gulf War. Went back to Germany from there and then returned to the Aberdeen Proving Ground in 1992.

I served with 1st Battalion, 36th Field Artillery Regiment during those years. That Battalion fought in WWII and we still had contact with several members that served during WWII including the Battalion Commander and the Sergeant Major both in their 80's in 1989. We conducted several fundraisers to invite and cover the costs for 6 of them to fly to Germany and visit us and have a reunion. The other 4 were in their late 60's. We had a short trip to our major training area in Grafenwohr (which is very close to the Iron Curtain at that time) and they were our guests. We had them observe us firing the same 8" rounds they fired during WWII. The HE 4 square projectile weighed 203 lbs. Add another 5 lbs for a fuse and we were shooting Charge 8 White Bag which adds 77 lbs of gunpowder. Even in 1989 we were still shooting projectiles and powder dated from 1944 manufactured date. The 6 WWII vets asked our Commander if they could send a few down range. We had our Gun Chief on the Howitzer to verify the sight picture before we let them pull tail on the mission. Those guys were as fast as my 20 year old artillerymen! And just as accurate putting steel on target! They said we had it easy with the hydraulic/electric loader rammer. They had to load and ram all rounds by hand in their day.
 

Newport 66

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I was deployed 15.5 years out of the 20 years I was in the Army. I was stationed in Augsburg, Germany from 1984-1992 nonstop except for 1990-1991 when I was in the Gulf War. Went back to Germany from there and then returned to the Aberdeen Proving Ground in 1992.

I served with 1st Battalion, 36th Field Artillery Regiment during those years. That Battalion fought in WWII and we still had contact with several members that served during WWII including the Battalion Commander and the Sergeant Major both in their 80's in 1989. We conducted several fundraisers to invite and cover the costs for 6 of them to fly to Germany and visit us and have a reunion. The other 4 were in their late 60's. We had a short trip to our major training area in Grafenwohr (which is very close to the Iron Curtain at that time) and they were our guests. We had them observe us firing the same 8" rounds they fired during WWII. The HE 4 square projectile weighed 203 lbs. Add another 5 lbs for a fuse and we were shooting Charge 8 White Bag which adds 77 lbs of gunpowder. Even in 1989 we were still shooting projectiles and powder dated from 1944 manufactured date. The 6 WWII vets asked our Commander if they could send a few down range. We had our Gun Chief on the Howitzer to verify the sight picture before we let them pull tail on the mission. Those guys were as fast as my 20 year old artillerymen! And just as accurate putting steel on target! They said we had it easy with the hydraulic/electric loader rammer. They had to load and ram all rounds by hand in their day.
First and foremost THANK YOU for your service!!!
Second thanks for sharing that story, very poignant and insightful, once military always military, no matter rank, age or service.
 

3C's & a D?

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On June 6th, 1944 the allies undertook the greatest amphibian troop movement in history./QUOTE]

At the time it was, and that is a common belief, however, almost a year later, on April first, (no fooling) 1945, the battle of Okinawa commenced with an even larger force.
 

3C's & a D?

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My Father went in D-day plus one, fought through Europe and the Battle of the Bulge. That's all he ever said.

My Grandpa was there. I don't know which wave. He passed away a week before I was born from lung cancer. He served the full (Canadian) six years. Never talked about it from what I'm told. He wouldn't even participate in veterans marches. He did enjoy drinking, smoking and gambling at the Legion we his friends. I always try to hide my pack of Export plains from my mom. She hates seeing them.
 

Rwc

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My Dad went across Utah beach. Would never discuss that, or the London air raids. When I was growing up all I knew was he was in the Army during WWII and he saw a lot of Europe. He wouldn't join the VFW or the American Legion. He did a little with AMVETS, but not the hanging around swapping stories.
 

mikedrini

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My grandfather was in the Navy during WWII and lied about his age to enlist (enlisted when he was 16). He wanted to get out of small town NH, serve his country and see the world. His facial hair grew so fast you could set your watch to it, so it was easy to believe. Regardless, he flew and fought like so many others and returned home to raise my Pop and his sister in small town Warren, NH.

It wasn't until years later looking back that all of us came to realize that serving our country were some of his favorite years and coming back to a small town to raise a family didn't really suit him much. He never spoke about it, never complained, just went about his business.

Ultimately depression (although you wouldn't know it talking with him) got the better of him along with the bottle and he died of cancer in his 50's. He was one of those conversational alcoholics who would drive around with a bottle under the seat of either his Newport or New Yorker. One of the hardest things my Pop had to do after Vietnam was grow older than his father was. He had no concept of what it was to grow into his 50's let alone make it to 70 (this year).

My grandfather is the reason my first classic was a Chrysler New Yorker as well as my preferred drink being Canadian Club.

Mike

RIP Bernardino Luciano Alessandrini 'Bumpa'
 

Newport 66

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My grandfather was in the Navy during WWII and lied about his age to enlist (enlisted when he was 16). He wanted to get out of small town NH, serve his country and see the world. His facial hair grew so fast you could set your watch to it, so it was easy to believe. Regardless, he flew and fought like so many others and returned home to raise my Pop and his sister in small town Warren, NH.

It wasn't until years later looking back that all of us came to realize that serving our country were some of his favorite years and coming back to a small town to raise a family didn't really suit him much. He never spoke about it, never complained, just went about his business.

Ultimately depression (although you wouldn't know it talking with him) got the better of him along with the bottle and he died of cancer in his 50's. He was one of those conversational alcoholics who would drive around with a bottle under the seat of either his Newport or New Yorker. One of the hardest things my Pop had to do after Vietnam was grow older than his father was. He had no concept of what it was to grow into his 50's let alone make it to 70 (this year).

My grandfather is the reason my first classic was a Chrysler New Yorker as well as my preferred drink being Canadian Club.

Mike

RIP Bernardino Luciano Alessandrini 'Bumpa'
That's a touching yet wonderful story. Only wish more of our youth today had the patriotism, desire and respect to serve and defend our nation. Most kids dont understand what it takes to stay free and have all the we have.....
 

imperialman

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When I started working in 1974 it wasn’t until years later that I discovered many of my older coworkers were WW2 veterans. One was with Patton’s 3rd Army in a tank. One was a belly gunner in a B-17. Another was a foot solider in the pacific. The “kid” of the group was in the army and served in Korea. They never talked about their service to the country, with most of what I learned, I did at their retirement party. God bless them as they are all gone now.
 

roadrunnerh

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Thanks for sharing guys. I have the utmost RESPECT for the young soldiers who served and especially those young men who lost their lives. Those men who stormed that beach had balls of steel, and were the bravest in the history of this wonderful country. God bless the survivors and these heroes and their families and loved ones who mourned the loss of the fallen. And God bless America!
 

1978 NYB

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Just a note.....

We had many Warfighters that served in WWII that eventually became Presidents.

Eisenhower
Kennedy
Nixon
Ford
Johnson
Carter (Naval Academy during WWII)
Reagan
H.W. Bush

And FDR was Commander In Chief
 

mr. fix it

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We were just treated to an unexpected fly by 1/2 hour ago as we drove in the Polara
It’s the Lanc based out of the Canadian warplane museum south of Hamilton


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