Electric Fuel Pump Location 67 Polara

RogueOne

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Hey all. I’m going to install a Mr. Gasket #12S electric fuel pump into my 67 Polara 383 with AC. Every now and then I need to prime the carb. I’m scratching my head on where to put it as it has to be at the lowest fluid level of the tank. I am probably going to bolt a steel bracket onto the drivers side frame rail aft of the axle where it curves back down after bridging the wheel well. It’s scares me though as it will just be hanging out in the open with nothing around it. Also, the wiring diagram that came with the pump isn’t very helpful. Would anyone be able to supply me with one or point me to one? Should I install the separate relay kit or just connect right into the ACC line after the ignition switch. I would have an on/off switch in the circuit so it’s not always running when the key is on. Will include the 5 amp fuse too. Any thoughts on where that should go in the circuit? Thanks!
 
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Justin Plant

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Most aftermarket horn relay kits available at Auto parts stores are 30 amp. That should be more than enough to handle the pump. I have a Holley "Blue" pump on my El Camino, its powered by a Wolo horn relay kit. 7 years later it still works flawlessly.
 
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I installed a Holley pump in my 67 Polara. I am not a big fan of the Holley due to excessive noise, but I do like an electric fuel pump. I may eventually swap to another brand when it fails. I find the original mechanical pumps have longevity problems with today's gas, plus I don't drive it that often and filling the bowl is a pain.

The mount is a tall piece of 1/8" plate that is the width of the fuel pump, located between the pumpkin and right shock. The top is bent at a slight angle to accommodate the trunk floor angle where it mounts, so that it stays vertical. The backside has a thin channel to stiffen it. The front side has an additional bracket heading forward to the body channel for the shock absorber.

On the inside of the trunk I made a plate strip that has three bolts tack welded to it, so when it is inserted through the trunk the bracket on the outside can be installed by one person.

There is a 90 degree brass fitting on the passenger side, and a 45 degree fitting on the driver's side.

Someday I will put down some dynamat or another product to dampen the noise it makes.
FuelTank_Pump.jpg
IMG_0229.JPG
IMG_0233.JPG
 
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RogueOne

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I installed a Holley pump in my 67 Polara. I am not a big fan of the Holley due to excessive noise, but I do like an electric fuel pump. I may eventually swap to another brand when it fails. I find the original mechanical pumps have longevity problems with today's gas, plus I don't drive it that often and filling the bowl is a pain.

The mount is a tall piece of 1/8" plate that is the width of the fuel pump, located between the pumpkin and right shock. The top is bent at a slight angle to accommodate the trunk floor angle where it mounts, so that it stays vertical. The backside has a thin channel to stiffen it. The front side has an additional bracket heading forward to the body channel for the shock absorber.

On the inside of the trunk I made a plate strip that has three bolts welded tack welded to it, so when it is inserted through the trunk the bracket on the outside can be installed by one person.

There is a 90 degree brass fitting on the passenger side, and a 45 degree fitting on the driver's side.

Someday I will put down some dynamat or another product to dampen the noise it makes.
View attachment 561361View attachment 561362View attachment 561363
Fantastic! Thank you for the photos. I presume you run the pump all the time correct? I was thinking of only using it to prime the carb but I’m not sure if the mechanical pump can pull fuel through the electric pump when it’s not running. Going to keep researching.
 
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Fantastic! Thank you for the photos. I presume you run the pump all the time correct? I was thinking of only using it to prime the carb but I’m not sure if the mechanical pump can pull fuel through the electric pump when it’s not running. Going to keep researching.
I run the pump all the time, and it is the only pump since I have blocked off the factory manual pump location on the block. Some of the guys on the Pontiac forums do run a mechanical and an electric pump, but I can't speak to that.

In our configuration, since there is no return line, it is known as deadheading the pump. I should install a fuel pressure regulator. I have got the stuff but have not gotten around to it yet. It had a tad more pressure than an Edelbrock AFB ought to be presented with. I have had trouble with the durability over time with aftermarket fuel pressure regulators on previous vehicles.

A few things:
1. Only use real Buss fuses. I am using ATC style. The knock-offs have a habit of blowing out way too easily. No problem with the Buss fuses of the same amperage.
2. I put a fuse next to the battery post where the power wire is.
3. I mounted the relay up under the dash near the fuse box. It helps to have a relay base with a screw hole in it. I ran the power wire to the pump under the carpeting, under the seat. It is sleeved with Varglas for protection (got it used on ebay because companies toss the rolls when they get past their expiration date), but you can use anything.
4. I will eventually add Dynamat or whatever to the entire upper rear seat body structure, in addition to the trunk floor, for better sound control. It sounds like I have a jackhammer in the trunk.
5. I used Permatex #2 to seal the inside of the trunk bolt plate to the body.
 

RogueOne

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I run the pump all the time, and it is the only pump since I have blocked off the factory manual pump location on the block. Some of the guys on the Pontiac forums do run a mechanical and an electric pump, but I can't speak to that.

In our configuration, since there is no return line, it is known as deadheading the pump. I should install a fuel pressure regulator. I have got the stuff but have not gotten around to it yet. It had a tad more pressure than an Edelbrock AFB ought to be presented with. I have had trouble with the durability over time with aftermarket fuel pressure regulators on previous vehicles.

A few things:
1. Only use real Buss fuses. I am using ATC style. The knock-offs have a habit of blowing out way too easily. No problem with the Buss fuses of the same amperage.
2. I put a fuse next to the battery post where the power wire is.
3. I mounted the relay up under the dash near the fuse box. It helps to have a relay base with a screw hole in it. I ran the power wire to the pump under the carpeting, under the seat. It is sleeved with Varglas for protection (got it used on ebay because companies toss the rolls when they get past their expiration date), but you can use anything.
4. I will eventually add Dynamat or whatever to the entire upper rear seat body structure, in addition to the trunk floor, for better sound control. It sounds like I have a jackhammer in the trunk.
5. I used Permatex #2 to seal the inside of the trunk bolt plate to the body.
Great stuff! Lots to go on. Thanks so much for the great details. It removes a lot of doubt from the process.
 
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Relay instructions from Summit relay kit,
IMG_E3616.JPG


Relay instructions from Holley,
IMG_3617.JPG


Tapping into ACCesory in fuse block with spent/empty/used/no bullet or powder present .22 shell casing (filled with solder and a wire going out of that to another ATC fuse holder). This triggers the relay when the key is switched on. The ACC was not equipped with a blade on the right side, because no accessories were installed there.
IMG_3594.JPG


Mounting the relay on the right side of the steering column. Relay mounting tab is attached to a flange on the heater box. Big red wire comes from solenoid near battery. Yellow wire from Accessory position on fuse panel. Gray is ground. Purple wire is outbound headed to the fuel pump to power it up (like in the Summit wiring diagram).
IMG_3595.JPG



This is the main power feed for the fuel pump. The orange wire is taken off the solenoid, spliced to the red wire after the ATC 15 amp fuse, and routed to the relay where it is allowed to flow when the relay is switched by turning the key on.
IMG_3589.JPG





A little more wisdom in this thread about psi's, regulators, and what not.

 
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