Exact Replacement A/C Components Now Becoming Available for Our C bodies

furious70

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Well I just dropped mine pieces off at the local radiator shop to have them check them for leaks and see if they are repairable. I have no idea about the condition of these parts. I took them out of a car in probably '95. It could possibly be good to be a pack rat!

For sure. 2 years ago I threw away a 72 NYer heater box that had good heater core and evap. SO STUPID!!!
 
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I'm glad to find this post as I am going to need all these parts for CB Savage. I wonder if they do ac hoses as well? The person that took the original engine out of the car cut the the ac hoses. I have bought parts made in China and have been pleased.
Off the subject of C bodies for a minute The only one making rear sump oil pans for the longest time was china along with the pickup tube (discontinued now), but was carried through 440 Source . The second 440 I have is from a 1979 Winne and is going into a 1992 Dodge D 150 club cab. I was too late to buy one of these pans from 440 source, but was able to find a rear sump oil pan kit on e-bay from Chrysler. So there are parts that are of quality from china.

By the way I have a Chrysler 300 as the parts donor for 69 CB Savage. Will be saving as many parts as possible. Learned to pack rat from my Father-in-law.
 
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furious70

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unless you're looking for exact OEM, there are many sources for hose/fitting kits that you can route the hoses however you want and then have the fittings crimped locally at a hydraulic place.
 

LocuMob

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unless you're looking for exact OEM, there are many sources for hose/fitting kits that you can route the hoses however you want and then have the fittings crimped locally at a hydraulic place.
Exactly. I know of a place in the suburbs of Minneapolis that can make hoses for cheap, they made one for my LHS when a tech cut one of the lines. There may even be a place closer to me, but I haven't had the need so I never checked. Hoses are simple,
 
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Thanks guys! I think I need someone a little closer to Las Cruces New Mexico. The hoses on the 300 are intact but I'm unsure of 50 year old hoses. To change over to R 134 I know that there are o-ring changes. I'll start tearing down savage this spring. At this point just trying to find sources and parts.
 

live4theking

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Well, I got some good and some bad news this afternoon when I picked up my heater core and evaporator. The heater core is junk which I suspected. The evaporator core tested good, so thumbs up there. Now once the weather breaks I'll be pulling the box from the New Yorker to swap the evaporators out.
 

twostick

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Exactly. I know of a place in the suburbs of Minneapolis that can make hoses for cheap, they made one for my LHS when a tech cut one of the lines. There may even be a place closer to me, but I haven't had the need so I never checked. Hoses are simple,

This is the stuff you need for DIY hoses. Click click and it's done.

E-Z Clip System for A/C Refrigerant Hoses

Kevin
 

saforwardlook

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While I am sure Eaton has a good sealing system, for me, it would never look original enough to pass my efforts to keep things looking as they were when built.
 

Pappy

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removed my heater box, dismantled and took the cores to a local radiator shop. cost $200 to clean, pressure test and close a few pinholes. Very much worth the cost.
 

Trace 300 Hurst

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removed my heater box, dismantled and took the cores to a local radiator shop. cost $200 to clean, pressure test and close a few pinholes. Very much worth the cost.

Nicely done!

I think it's rare that a core is completely rotted away and is unrepairable, because at the first pinhole the owner short-circuits the heater hoses and goes on without heat, the accidentally preventing further damage from crappy, corrosive coolant.
 

saforwardlook

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removed my heater box, dismantled and took the cores to a local radiator shop. cost $200 to clean, pressure test and close a few pinholes. Very much worth the cost.

If it had a "few pin holes to close", then it will likely have more in the future. I believe it is better to have the radiator shop put in new proper thickness cores that they may have to cut down to the correct dimensions. At least that is what I had to have done to one of my older cars once and it worked fine. For about $200. I can say for sure on my fuselage C bodies with a/c, I do not want to do that job more than once in my lifetime.

Fortunately, the company cited above makes heater core assemblies for many of our cars that are as original. That would be best IMO.
 

furious70

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Replacement cores don't fit and aren't of high quality. Yes we had that argument already.
 

saforwardlook

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Replacement cores don't fit and aren't of high quality. Yes we had that argument already.

You had the argument with yourself, and you still don't have an answer despite what your massive ego has concluded.

Where is the conclusion that supports your statement in this thread? From what I read above, live4theking above has not been able to check to see if the one from ACGlobal fits or not - I am not even sure he has ordered it either. Just because you bought some piece of crap probably made in China off of Ebay, that doesn't say anything about the heater cores from ACGlobal, which are made in the U.S. by the way if you even had looked at the manufacturer writeup I pointed out at the beginning of the thread.
 

saforwardlook

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And you have "traveled a few miles along this hobby"..............? OK
 
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furious70

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If you're talking to me I'll stand by my efforts in the hobby, any day of the week.
 

Trace 300 Hurst

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If it had a "few pin holes to close", then it will likely have more in the future.

I agree about 99%, but I've had good success by doing it myself with cores that aren't totally rotted away (which is always a guess/mystery). I'll spend hours going over the core with a dental pick, probing for holes. Once I find one, I drill it out just a bit so I'm not soldering over "condom-thin" metal. I've also used thin copper sheet to effect the repair. And sometimes I've just given up. :(

Tedious? Yes.
Possibly a total waste of time after a month or two? Yes.
Allows you to do a stopgap and get the car together? Yes.
Might you get a few years out of it? Hopefully. :eek:

My hopefulness comes from the fact that the repaired core will be filled with a heavy dose of all new coolant that might prevent further corrosion. :thumbsup:
 

saforwardlook

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I agree about 99%, but I've had good success by doing it myself with cores that aren't totally rotted away (which is always a guess/mystery). I'll spend hours going over the core with a dental pick, probing for holes. Once I find one, I drill it out just a bit so I'm not soldering over "condom-thin" metal. I've also used thin copper sheet to effect the repair. And sometimes I've just given up. :(

Tedious? Yes.
Possibly a total waste of time after a month or two? Yes.
Allows you to do a stopgap and get the car together? Yes.
Might you get a few years out of it? Hopefully. :eek:

My hopefulness comes from the fact that the repaired core will be filled with a heavy dose of all new coolant that might prevent further corrosion. :thumbsup:

You must like changing out heater cores on your Hurst a lot more than I do. I assume yours has a/c though.

I personally would never waste my time on trying to make a rusty, weak heater core go another short distance and wonder every time I drive the car whether it will let loose on me at the worst time. If you do a lot of repairs like that, you will probably never have a reliable car over the long term. Just my opinion.
 

Trace 300 Hurst

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You must like changing out heater cores on your Hurst a lot more than I do. I assume yours has a/c though.

I personally would never waste my time on trying to make a rusty, weak heater core go another short distance and wonder every time I drive the car whether it will let loose on me at the worst time. If you do a lot of repairs like that, you will probably never have a reliable car over the long term. Just my opinion.

In general, I share your opinion. As a young, poor fellow, I HAD to solder the cores of my cars and friends cars. We all did stopgap repairs back then. If a core is riddled with holes....toss it and hope you can find a better or NOS item. If it has one pinhole--which is typical because that's when it gets bypassed--then a repair might last for years.

In my 68 Dart, back in 1975, the core would steam a little bit when I hammered the engine and raised the temp/pressure. With normal driving it was okay. Talk about walking the fine line for a failure to douse your girlfriend's feet!

My Hurst core was very nice (I think!) when I had it all apart a year ago to rebuild the whole AC system. Perhaps the mouse poop protected it. :(

EDIT: When I had this unit apart, I had no source for a core and didn't want a used item. So I was fully prepared to do a bit of soldering if I found a weak spot. The heater had been bypassed long ago, so I had no idea if it had a leak. But because it had no heat control valve on the fender and it was a New Mexico/Texas car (warm weather) I was hopeful that was the reason for the bypass vs. a leak. Turns out, the core was quite solid. Had some worrisome greenish "dots", but a "gentle dental" showed no dangers.


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