Filling dry brake system.

Brakes, Suspension, Rims and Tires

  1. Drew-Pritchett

    Drew-Pritchett Member

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    So on my 1964 300k I replaced the two front wheel cylinders, upgraded to a dual MC, and new lines up front.

    Now time to fill with fluid. Is there a special procedure to do this? Or do I just fill at the MC and do a normal bleed procedure?

    New to brake work! As always any help is greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Mopars & Missiles

    Mopars & Missiles Well-Known Member

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    Always best to "bench bleed" the M/C first, then bleed all 4 corners in the normal fashion.
     
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  3. 65sporty

    65sporty Old Man with a Hat

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    Bench bleeding is a must or it will take forever to get it done.
     
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  4. CBODY67

    CBODY67 Senior Member

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    On the assembly line, they pull a vacuum on the system. When the vacuum reaches a certain leval and maintains it, then the fluid goes in. All at once. Happens very quickly. Same with the coolant.

    Some shops used to use a "pressure bleeder" mechanism. A port clamped onto the master cylinder and pressurized the system. When each wheel cyl was cracked open, it flushed out that line (air and debris). Have to constantly monitor the amount of brake fluid in the bleeder's reservoir.

    Using a hand vacuum pump at each wheel cyl might be the best "one person" way to do things now? Just make sure the m/cyl is full of fluid!

    Just some thoughts,
    CBODY67
     
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  5. 62dodge

    62dodge Active Member

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    What i do is bench bleed the M/C fill the system with fluid open all the bleeders on the slave cylinders than go have lunch. After a few hours when the fluid is at all of the wheels its time to grab a friend to assist in pump and release
     
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  6. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    As stated above, bench bleed the MC first. Leaving the bleeders open for a bit will help too.

    I have used a vacuum pump for a lot of years, although a good helper pumping the brakes is hard to beat.

    I had some issues with a bad bleeder that was almost impossible to find (it would take in air, but not leak fluid). It was driving me nuts and I broke down and bought a pressure bleeder to help me find the problem. I think it's one of the better investments I made. Brake bleeding suddenly became very simple. Power Bleeder
     
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  7. Mopars & Missiles

    Mopars & Missiles Well-Known Member

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    Bought that same pressure bleeder that Big John has. Although a bit cumbersome to set up, once you have it all connected properly the brakes are very easy to bleed by yourself, no helper needed.

    I don't use the chain system that is provided to clamp the lid on the M/C. I just use a large C-clamp.
     
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  8. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    Gotta agree on that. The chains might work OK with other master cylinders, but it's much better with a simple c-clamp. Otherwise a very good system and worth every penny.
     
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