Finally got my dream car : 2-dr 300!

CitronPresse

Member
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
80
Reaction score
101
Location
Quebec, QC
Okay guys here are some news...

I ended up receiving the correct sending unit...it's really identical to the OEM so it should be good! :)
It arrives exactly in its place in the bottom of the tank
TkELsBI.jpg

8tZrqpV.jpg


I made myself a small gift: a brand new 20gal air compressor...very useful for cleaning fuel lines with compressed air
vcWPTU1.jpg


I replaced all the rubber fuel lines: two vent lines on the tank, one between the car and the sending unit, one in the middle of the main steel fuel line at the passenger door, one between this steel line (exiting in the passenger side frame rail at the firewall) and the fuel pump, and one between the fuel pump and a copper fuel line just before the carb
Before installing the new rubber lines I checked and cleaned all the steel lines with the compressor, they were full of old rotten gas but they seems to be good, I didn't find any hole and air came out at the end of each line
Then I installed the new rubber lines and a new fuel filter between the pump and the carb

Installed the new fuel filler neck seal, not the same that the original one but it works
m1Q59DA.jpg

DJW07CI.jpg


Installing the tank alone is no easy task but with a second jack I succeeded :D
ex0TRnD.jpg

8bpvzJq.jpg

UvYLzSP.jpg

5Rbr0oG.jpg


The fuel filler neck freshly painted (3 coats of primer and 3 of gloss black paint...I didn't know what was the original color :( )
GqcB9AT.jpg

By hitting the filler neck to return it to its place in the tank opening I realized that there was still rust in it and it had just fallen into the tank :BangHead:
The radiator shop sandblasted for me the filler neck but there is a little part inside which they probably didn't manage to clean completely
I vacuumed what I could with my Shopvac vacuum and the long tip, it should be okay...anyway any dirt that may remain in the fuel system should be caught by the filter, which I plan to replace after one or two starts (I have a second new one for this purpose)

Anyway I have other problems at the moment: the car doesn't start at all...

I put about 6.5 gallons of premium gas in the tank and tried...the old battery (contrary to what I thought) doesn't weaken but the gas doesn't arrive at the pump...or at least at the filter after the pump

There is no plugged fuel line, they are all either clean (steel) or new (rubber), the tank is new, the fuel sending unit is new
You immediately think about the pump but it was working very fine 2 weeks ago, the engine was running...until the fuel can from which the pump was sucking gas ran empty
Probably the pump has sucked in air, apparently it may be necessary to prime it in these cases...what do you think of this method? Is it good?
How to Prime a Carburetor and Fuel Pump

Obviously it would be easier if the pump had a manual "lever" to prime it but it's not the case on a C-body (and other old cars like this I suppose)

I made two videos of the "cranking", I could upload them if it could help but basically the starter cranks but we feel that the fuel doesn't arrive, I filmed the fuel filter we see that nothing happen
It's not like the car hadn't ran in years, the pump, all the ignition system and the timing were good 2 weeks ago, the car was running with the fuel can, so I don't see what it could be except for the pump priming, I'll try that soon but if you have other ideas please let me know! :)
 

The Goose

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2016
Messages
2,449
Reaction score
4,349
Location
Santa Clarita ca
Sometimes cranking the engine just won’t get er done. Try starting it w carb cleaner and burp it along w that until the gas makes it all the way thru.

You can also blow air backwards thru the lines and listen for air or bubbles at the tank to double check you have no blockages.

Hang in there it started before it’ll start again bud.
 

LocuMob

Fluid Technician with a hat
Joined
Oct 31, 2013
Messages
13,910
Reaction score
15,965
Location
Winnebago Mn
I used a MightyVac to draw fuel up to the pump, my car fired up after that.
 

Kram Edyorloh

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2020
Messages
115
Reaction score
64
Location
Halifax, UK
I have to be honest mate, I would replace the fuel lines regardless of what they appear to be like, its a simple job, they all are,( these cars are so easy to work on), its just not worth risking it when you have gone to all that trouble, just advice gained from fkn around with these cars for 40years. Love the car Fella.
 

CitronPresse

Member
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
80
Reaction score
101
Location
Quebec, QC
I have to be honest mate, I would replace the fuel lines regardless of what they appear to be like, its a simple job, they all are,( these cars are so easy to work on), its just not worth risking it when you have gone to all that trouble, just advice gained from fkn around with these cars for 40years. Love the car Fella.

Thanks for you advice! :)
In fact it doesn't really go according to my plans, I had planned a certain budget so that the car goes to the garage directly after the purchase so that my mechanic takes care of restarting it in the best conditions
But with the pandemic it is closed so I have to take care of certain operations myself to at least put the car in a "running condition", with my weak knowledge
And time is running out, I have to free the garage to put my other car (Renault 5) back there soon (it is hosted elsewhere for the moment), but it's not excluded that I have the steel lines replaced later by my mechanic :)

I removed the fuel pump today
There is nothing to say that it is shot but I suppose that the internal diaphragm is, and given the price of a new pump (20$ on the net, 60$ at my local parts shop) I prefer to put a new one to be certain!
11ofZAv.jpg

6VH6os2.jpg

Ymgi6gG.jpg


The rod which actuates the pump seems in good condition but it is difficult to say for me who have never seen any other :D
OALmiod.jpg
 

Kram Edyorloh

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2020
Messages
115
Reaction score
64
Location
Halifax, UK
The push rod looks fine Fella, the diaphragm will have pin holes in it more than likely, with how your other stuff looks like what you took off, its not worth skipping anything on the fuel side, it WILL bite you down the road.
Its good you are taking advice if you are not sure.
We never stop learning,
example, I have only just learned what a "Superlite" is LOL, me thinking "shit, this thing must have come with alloy fenders and bumpers, radio delete, etc,"... all that sort of stuff...wow!, nope, means both beams light up on occasion...really?...yawn...(in my World) LOL
 

CitronPresse

Member
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
80
Reaction score
101
Location
Quebec, QC
Good news guys! The car is running!

vk1KK3c.jpg

I finally received the new fuel pump, installed it (what a pain with the pushrod which falls back and blocks the lever of the pump) and the car started easily...
The carb is needing a good adjustement (but my mechanics will install a new Holley carb next week), the engine stalls and I give it too much gas, but it idles fine

M8W0gRf.jpg

34kfPOt.jpg


Yes I ended up having an appointment with my mechanics (a real pro, specialized in old V8s) for next week (may 20), he will do a complete check-up to tell me exactly what will need to be replaced
He'll replace the carb with my almost new Holley performance one that I have from my buddy's '70 NewYorker, and the new Cardone brake booster and master-cylinder...I'm not sure the booster will fit so I can't wait to find out!

Since the 300 is now able to move by itself I'll be able to take it out of my garage to put back there my Renault 5...the 300 will sleep in the street now :(
In anticipation of this I'll take advantage that everything is perfectly dry to apply a row of silicone sealer on the edges of the window moldings (mainly those of the windshield and the backglass), a method I already told you about, used by a friend and very effective in preventing water and moisture from accumulating under those window's seals

To do a clean and as discreet work as possible you must first clean the surface with compressed air, then some 70% alcool and apply several rows of masking tape to delimit the areas where to spread the silicone...

Zoz846Z.jpg

4lI5w9U.jpg

Rlb9h6S.jpg

aajoQkh.jpg

E0gasCd.jpg

xZvnhXm.jpg

VT8UCW8.jpg


Then just apply the (clear or ideally black) silicone and smooth it with your finger for a smooth and pleasing result
I haven't applied it yet, I'm waiting for a warm and sunny day (it's cold these days in Quebec), ideal for easier application of silicone

There is only one hole in the vinyl roof...
1yugnJb.jpg

nmSE3l4.jpg


I wonder about the best method to adopt to repair it and seal it in the least ugly and more efficient way possible...
The vinyl is peeled off (I don't know how to tell it in english sorry) the metal for several inches around the hole, I thought I would make a clean and straight incision to expose the peeled part, clean the metal as best as possible and apply some (specialized) glue to re-stick the vinyl, and seal the opening with silicone or other stuff

Has anyone ever done this? Is there a better method? Give me your opinion and advice please! :D
 

3C's & a D?

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2015
Messages
1,624
Reaction score
1,331
Location
By the tree in Edmonton
It's alive! And moves under its own power! Great to see the progress. Hopefully there isn't too much, or any rust where that hole is. If so, I would make one straight cut in the vinyl, upwards towards the top of the roof, just a little past where it has lifted from the glue. Scrape any rust down and seal with primer and paint, if needed. Wait at least a few days for it to cure. Then use a liberal amount of contact cement, applied with a small brush, and push the glue all the way around the insides where it has lifted. Push it down against the roof, then peel it back up and let dry. Then go back and push it down, if there isn't any pieces missing, excess glue may seep out from the crack and may do a good job sealing the vinyl. If you're missing a chunk, one of the permatex vinyl repair kits will help get it looking better.
 

CitronPresse

Member
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
80
Reaction score
101
Location
Quebec, QC
Hi guys sorry for this long absence!!
I'm a classic cars appraiser and it's the rush from May to July
I get paid to drive my car and see lots of beautiful cars, so I can't complain, but it's true that I have little free time these days

Here's the latest news: the car went to the garage as planned...
I tried to bring it to the garage by road (about 10 minutes far), in the evening when the streets are the least crowded and keeping my distance because with a brake booster inoperative you have to press very hard on the brakes
I had problems but not because of the brakes
At the first intersection the engine stalled and after restarting I could no longer move by pressing gas pedal, just by releasing the brakes with the transmission on D, it was quite long to cross the intersection

I had however managed to run the car twice in the previous days without any particular problem...
So I stopped on the side of the road to think for a few minutes, engine running, so I decided not to take risks and to return home...the way back was done without problem, without ever stalling

Once at home I had the car towed to the garage

15hWLX2.jpg

CAhLJQl.jpg

MDOQPZS.jpg

Pz5nRlX.jpg

nRc94nN.jpg


I realized after that that I could have easily reach the garage...if I had allowed the engine to warm up...
The previous times when I had run the car I had taken the time to warm up the engine before leaving, not this time...and as my choke system is inoperative, the engine stalls immediately if I accelerate when it's cold, nothing abnormal :rofl:

So...I sent the car to the garage for 3 things:
-get a full inspection to find out what needs to be replaced to be able to drive safely (as the car is a barnfind that has been stored for 30 years)
-install my almost new Holley carb to replace the original one whose seals are shot, allowing gas to flow freely from the carb (pretty dangerous to drive it as is, I know)
-install the new brake master-cylinder and booster...or at least try to install the booster,
as the booster model corresponding to my car (power brake drum-drum) can't be found

My mechanic had planned a few hours for that, so I expected to see my repaired and inspected car in the next 2-3 days...
It's been almost a month and a half today that the car is in the garage yard...
I told him to begin by doing the inspection to be able to do the rest of the work while waiting to receive any parts to be replaced, and to continue trying to install the booster since I knew there was a big risk that it is not suitable
He waited a month before touching the car and did everything in reverse order:
installed the carb last week and corrected some vaccum problems, to finally realize that there was a major engine oil leak at the oil filter base and transmission oil at a seal somewhere...what he would have noticed from the start if he had started by doing the general inspection as requested :BangHead:
So he ordered and installed the parts to correct the oil leaks (3 days more delay),
to finish by trying to install the booster (with the master cylinder) and obviously realize that it does not match : the rod in the booster is 2 inches too long :D
So here we are, the booster for the right model is nowhere to be found, the garage storekeeper will do research to find a workshop that can open the two boosters (the old and the new) and transfer the rod from the old to the new since it's apparently the only thing that makes the new don't match

Otherwise the ideal could have been to rebuild the old booster, basically I bought a new booster of an uncertain model because it seems that no more workshop in my region rebuilds brake boosters, I didn't want to send it to the USA for a rebuilding because I didn't want to wait 6 weeks (finally I would have had time ... :rofl: ), but if the guy from the garage finds a workshop in my region who can rebuild it, I will do that!


Some pictures of the car in its natural habitat ... the street :(
7iOv9kg.jpg

vnE5cvE.jpg

OQtIsLg.jpg

KWnrZou.jpg

pxiXwv0.jpg

1jxgbPI.jpg


To finish, I didn't show you pictures of the silicone seals when finished...
HP66gyA.jpg

O3J9ue6.jpg

famPJF5.jpg

LlIcz8f.jpg

RRslceo.jpg

It could have been better looking but it's been a long time since I had done that ... the masking tape still allows you to do a fairly clean job, and the main thing is that everything is sealed effectively, so that the water and moisture does not infiltrate under moldings to create rust
...you will see in the next post that I should have coated the vinyl with a waterproofing stuff (I ordered one for this purpose) before exposing the car to the weather: the vinyl is dry and cracked in some places and the water/moisture has managed to get there infiltrate, so rust has already started under the vinyl at these places...only surface rust for now but will worsen quickly as long as I don't rip off the vinyl unfortunately :BangHead:
 
Last edited:

77newyorker440

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2020
Messages
513
Reaction score
280
Location
Peanut State, USA
Hey, I just found your thread, very interesting read, I am in a similar situation with a 1977 New Yorker with the 440 engine that sat for 15 years. I'm looking to do some performance upgrades but currently battling a really bad valve cover oil leak, which has completely covered both sides of the block :( Looking forward to hearing some updates on your project, especially if you end up putting headers on, I may try to do the same on mine but I don't think it will be an easy task.
Thanks,
77newyorker440
 

CitronPresse

Member
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
80
Reaction score
101
Location
Quebec, QC
Hi guys sorry for the delay! A lot has happened since the last time!

I had to send my booster in a shop in Ontario (John Stuart Brake Boosters) for a rebuild (500$), I bought a brand new battery, 4 brand new 235/75R15 Firestone tires that I installed on 15x7 wheels with dog dish hubcaps, I spoiled myself with a nice dual exhaust system
After all that I had troubles with the charging system, so I installed a new alternator and a new voltage regulator...it didn't work so I took the car to a specialist in auto electrical and classic Mopar lover that I have known for a long time (he had corrected a lot of electrical problems on my '68 300)
He fixed everything: there was a broken connector at the firewall, Rockauto had sent me the wrong model of alternator (2 fields instead of one) so he modified it, and the new regulator was therefore defective, so we reinstalled the original old one which finally worked perfectly


I have driven relatively little with the car this summer because there was always a problem, things are starting to improve slowly and I drove it a couple of times in the past days, this car is really nice to drive, very powerful!
But there are still a lot of issues to fix, looks like it never ends:
-valve cover gasket oil leak
-exhaust manifold leak (my exhaust guy will fix it for me for $300CAD)
-transmission fluid leak (looks like my mechanic didn't achieve to correct it the first time)
-power windows are a real pain, only the driver side one is working correctly, and the passenger side fell in the door...
-water enters the trunk
-rust makes its way under the vinyl roof which is no longer waterproof
-the fuel tank leaks if I full it past the halfway (despite the fact that everything is new...tank, sending unit, seals...)
-cluster panel lighting is not working
-brake lights don't work either (however I just replaced the brake pedal switch, I have no luck with the new parts)
-engine temperature gauge isn't working either, the temperature sensor isn't even connected, and I have a custom temperature gauge so I don't know how to correct that

Motivation is not at its best

I'll try to show you some pictures soon!
 

LocuMob

Fluid Technician with a hat
Joined
Oct 31, 2013
Messages
13,910
Reaction score
15,965
Location
Winnebago Mn
For your fuel leak, find the old retainer ring, or any old retainer ring, and swap it out with the new one you installed. The new ones leak, I had the same problem, fuel poured out. Swapped to a beat up, rusty one that isn't even centered, no more leaks! Simple and will make you feel a whole lot better. Good to hear you're getting some enjoyment out of the car, and yeah, it never ends. :lol:
 
Last edited:

3C's & a D?

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2015
Messages
1,624
Reaction score
1,331
Location
By the tree in Edmonton
Glad to hear you got some time behind the wheel! Gremlins will be popping up along the way after such a long slumber. Sounds like you've dealt with the larger one's, now the smaller one's are more noticeable. Your car is without question worth the effort. Pictures are always welcome!
 

CitronPresse

Member
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
80
Reaction score
101
Location
Quebec, QC
Hi there!

Spring is well established even here in Quebec, it's time to bring the beast out of its hibernation!

Obviously the trouble continue to accumulate and I don't know when I'll finally be able to really hit the road with this damn car on a regular basis... I very much regret having bought a barnfind instead of a roadworthy car with the little time, space and experience that I have, that will not happen to me again I promise, I don't know if I should get rid of it or continue to put effort into it, I continue for the moment and while waiting to post more photos and info to you, I have some technical questions, your knowledge is more valuable than ever!

1) the valve cover gaskets were leaking a bit last year, I just took the car out of the garage and now it's almost flowing over the exhaust manifolds (I let you imagine the smoke)
I obviously tried to tighten the bolts but that doesn't change much, the gaskets are officially shot, which is normal after sitting 30 years in a barn I guess
My question is: on the 1970 NewYorker which I mentioned earlier in the thread (and which I kept the engine as a spare), I tried to replace the VC gaskets and I had broken 2 bolts in the cylinder heads by unscrewing (without even forcing excessively) ... is it common during this kind of operation? What precautions can I take other than drowning the bolts in penetrating oil several times before the operation and knocking a bit on them with the socket and a hammer before unscrewing?

This is the most urgent concern I have at the moment but I will have more you can count on me! XD
A big thanks in advance to those who will take time to advise me! :D
 
Last edited:

NY69

Active Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2014
Messages
220
Reaction score
303
Location
NL, NB
Imo very uncommon, especially whilst unscrewing. Pretty sure the damage was already done on your NY-er before you even touched it.
Good luck, and hold on.
 

TX9

Member
Joined
May 23, 2016
Messages
163
Reaction score
240
Location
WEST MARIN
Nice Classic Full Size Rides! You Have Great Taste! I've owned many MOPARS; majority E Body, a few B Body and now C Body . . . but my VERY FIRST CAR was a '70 Mercury Marauder!!! A secret [parents never knew about!] beater, me and a buddy bought together at 17 years old when the Big Merc was only 7 years old and SUPER cheap! We were all San Francisco Giant / 49er Vendors at Candlestick Park- we'd pile nearly 8 high school bros in that beast on game days . . . Cool Thread!
 

3C's & a D?

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2015
Messages
1,624
Reaction score
1,331
Location
By the tree in Edmonton
Don't throw in the towel yet!

I've done many valve cover gaskets, and never had a bolt or stud break. They're usually well lubricated from the leaking and vapours. Your's will probably have studs on two corner's.
 

CitronPresse

Member
Joined
May 7, 2015
Messages
80
Reaction score
101
Location
Quebec, QC
Imo very uncommon, especially whilst unscrewing. Pretty sure the damage was already done on your NY-er before you even touched it.
Good luck, and hold on.
Don't throw in the towel yet!
I've done many valve cover gaskets, and never had a bolt or stud break. They're usually well lubricated from the leaking and vapours. Your's will probably have studs on two corner's.

Nice, thanks to you two!
My first and only experience with VCs was bad so I assumed the probability that it would be the same as the 2nd
So I'm going to try!
I have seen several "horror stories" on the net about VCs still leaking even after being replaced (it's like illnesses, I should stop looking on the net), I guess if my cylinder heads and my VCs are straight there shouldn't be any problem, I'm going to buy steel-reinforced gaskets, they're better than cork ones, right?

You are right 3Cs, they have 2 studs on the corners, is there anything special to know about these studs?

Nice Classic Full Size Rides! You Have Great Taste! I've owned many MOPARS; majority E Body, a few B Body and now C Body . . . but my VERY FIRST CAR was a '70 Mercury Marauder!!! A secret [parents never knew about!] beater, me and a buddy bought together at 17 years old when the Big Merc was only 7 years old and SUPER cheap! We were all San Francisco Giant / 49er Vendors at Candlestick Park- we'd pile nearly 8 high school bros in that beast on game days . . . Cool Thread!

Ahah thanks! :p
Nice memories, and nice era, I would have liked to know the 60s/70s!
 
Top