Fluids? Engine Oil, Transmission Fluid, Brake Fluid etc…

Isaiah Estrada

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As we near firing up this engine for the first time, I’ve been thinking about what fluids I should be using.

Keep in mind, EVERYTHING is bone dry. New cold case aluminum radiator, motor rebuilt top to bottom, and transmission rebuilt with a new TF2 shift kit. Pretty excited about it all!

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I live in the warm coastal area of California (technically So-Cal but not often included in its definition.) What I’m trying to say, is we don’t get brutal winters or harsh weather, other than sometimes soaring temperatures in the summer. Here in Santa Maria it rarely gets above 95.

Not sure if that has any impact on what coolant to use, and motor oil viscosity.

Also thinking about what coolant to run. Since I converted my belt setup for non-ac, I’m running an 8 blade pump with a Milodon 180° thermostat. The thermostat I found in the housing was a Stant 180° so I wanted to replace it with the same temp.

What fluid for disc brakes?
Power steering?

Thanks for any and all help!
 

CBODY67

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One of the original 1968-era motor oil suggestions was 10W-30 or straight 30 viscosity motor oil. ATF was Dexron-family, which would be Dexron III equivalent. Power Steering has its own fluid, which is clear/waxy looking. I've used the GM 1050017 (probably a newer part number now) as it looked exactly like the Chrysler fluid I used to buy in a quart container (with a rolled lip for decreased drip possibilities). DOT 3 or higher brake fluid in a quality brand (all of which are compatible with disc or drum brakes / I've used Castrol GT LMA in the past with no problems).

In your climate, you still need protection to -34 degrees F, mainly to get enough additive in the coolant to prevent corrosion. The default would be the normal "green" coolant, but the gold Valvoline might be an option, too? NO GM-spec Dexcool!!!

Not mentioned, but applicable would be Ford-spec wheel beearing/chassis lube, as it has moly in the formulation and works with disc brakes, too. For that, I used to get the blue-tube of Valvoline synthetic grease, but now it's a gray color. Key thing, is the "Ford-spec" and "synthetic". Check their website for more information. I used to get it at Pep Boys but I think that AutoZone carries it too.

Rear axle lube? Normal 90-weight rear axle lube of your favorite brand. Maybe the limited-slip additive it that is needed? Most OEMs now use a synthetic rear axle lube in that viscosity. Your choice.

DO pressure-lube the engine before you fire it off. Hopefully y'all used the appropriate moly paste on the cam lobes and other places on the cam items for initial lube? For good measure, you might remove the valve covers and pour some oil over the rocker arms and shafts, etc. Several ways to do this pre-fire oiling situation.

I know the excitement is building, but do TRY to remain calm and ENJOY!

Good luck,
CBODY67
 

volksworld

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well so i dont have to write a book here do some research on ZDDP and why "normal" oils have pretty much eliminated it (screws up converters) and why flat tappet cams need it...especially for break in...assume you have a new cam and lifters but iirc its stock...in my case i used a Hughes cam so i'm using the Joe Gibbs Driven 10w40 break in oil because he basically wouldnt guarantee the cam unless i used it...as far as something you could find at a FLAPS Royal Purple special break in oil (non synthetic) may be about the only thing readily available...lots of people make hi ZDDP oils for flat tappet engines (Gibbs,Brad Penn and Lucas are 3 that come to mind) but most of them your probably going to have to order online ...lots of folks like the older diesel spec oils that had hi ZDDP too...
Dextron III is what the trans calls for but i'd talk to whoever rebuilt it as far as their recommendations...my tranny guy put ford stuff in everything he built and claimed it was heavier viscosity so it made for firmer shifts but that doesnt mean i use it in mine...i'd second the Castrol dot 4 brake fluid as i've been using it both in my shop and in my race cars for the last 40 years (retired from both) but again i can no longer find it locally and have to order it online...i'd vote for normal Prestone...many of the newer coolants that are "designed "for aluminum dont play well with brass and solder and i think the last thing you'd want to do is pull the heater box back out to change the heater core
 
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detmatt

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Brad Penn is now known as Penn Grade and that’s what I use in my classics. I order it though summit but it is also on the shelf at my Auto Value parts store. 30 weight would be what you want. My trans guy tells me ATF+4 and that I shouldn’t be picky about brands. I use dot 5 brake fluid as long as the old dot 3 has been evacuated. It works fantastic, doesn’t absorb moisture like the others and won’t screw up your paint if you happen to spill or splash some. Prestone 50/50.
 

stubs300

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I’ve been thinking about what fluids I should be using.

Keep in mind, EVERYTHING is bone dry. New cold case aluminum radiator, motor rebuilt top to bottom, and transmission rebuilt with a new TF2 shift kit. Pretty excited about it all!

Not sure if that has any impact on what coolant to use, and motor oil viscosity.

Also thinking about what coolant to run. Since I converted my belt setup for non-ac, I’m running an 8 blade pump with a Milodon 180° thermostat. The thermostat I found in the housing was a Stant 180° so I wanted to replace it with the same temp.

What fluid for disc brakes?
Power steering?

Thanks for any and all help!

Don't overthink it, you might hurt yourself! It's a car, as long as it's fresh it won't know the difference!
Oil? What the cam Mfgr. recommendations on what to use, I bet you didn't ask them?
Coolant? Use what and as much as you want, as long as it's green!
Tranny? What's the builder recommend you use, I doubt if you ever asked them either?
What's the brake Mfgr. recommend, otherwise dot4.
P.S.? Use what you want as long as the bottle says "power steering" fluid on it!
This isn't rocket science your dealing with, it's a car!
 

Isaiah Estrada

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One of the original 1968-era motor oil suggestions was 10W-30 or straight 30 viscosity motor oil. ATF was Dexron-family, which would be Dexron III equivalent. Power Steering has its own fluid, which is clear/waxy looking. I've used the GM 1050017 (probably a newer part number now) as it looked exactly like the Chrysler fluid I used to buy in a quart container (with a rolled lip for decreased drip possibilities). DOT 3 or higher brake fluid in a quality brand (all of which are compatible with disc or drum brakes / I've used Castrol GT LMA in the past with no problems).

In your climate, you still need protection to -34 degrees F, mainly to get enough additive in the coolant to prevent corrosion. The default would be the normal "green" coolant, but the gold Valvoline might be an option, too? NO GM-spec Dexcool!!!

Not mentioned, but applicable would be Ford-spec wheel beearing/chassis lube, as it has moly in the formulation and works with disc brakes, too. For that, I used to get the blue-tube of Valvoline synthetic grease, but now it's a gray color. Key thing, is the "Ford-spec" and "synthetic". Check their website for more information. I used to get it at Pep Boys but I think that AutoZone carries it too.

Rear axle lube? Normal 90-weight rear axle lube of your favorite brand. Maybe the limited-slip additive it that is needed? Most OEMs now use a synthetic rear axle lube in that viscosity. Your choice.

DO pressure-lube the engine before you fire it off. Hopefully y'all used the appropriate moly paste on the cam lobes and other places on the cam items for initial lube? For good measure, you might remove the valve covers and pour some oil over the rocker arms and shafts, etc. Several ways to do this pre-fire oiling situation.

I know the excitement is building, but do TRY to remain calm and ENJOY!

Good luck,
CBODY67

Thanks much for that sound advice! Can't wait to share what this car sounds like running again :)

well so i dont have to write a book here do some research on ZDDP and why "normal" oils have pretty much eliminated it (screws up converters) and why flat tappet cams need it...especially for break in...assume you have a new cam and lifters but iirc its stock...in my case i used a Hughes cam so i'm using the Joe Gibbs Driven 10w40 break in oil because he basically wouldnt guarantee the cam unless i used it...as far as something you could find at a FLAPS Royal Purple special break in oil (non synthetic) may be about the only thing readily available...lots of people make hi ZDDP oils for flat tappet engines (Gibbs,Brad Penn and Lucas are 3 that come to mind) but most of them your probably going to have to order online ...lots of folks like the older diesel spec oils that had hi ZDDP too...
Dextron III is what the trans calls for but i'd talk to whoever rebuilt it as far as their recommendations...my tranny guy put ford stuff in everything he built and claimed it was heavier viscosity so it made for firmer shifts but that doesnt mean i use it in mine...i'd second the Castrol dot 4 brake fluid as i've been using it both in my shop and in my race cars for the last 40 years (retired from both) but again i can no longer find it locally and have to order it online...i'd vote for normal Prestone...many of the newer coolants that are "designed "for aluminum dont play well with brass and solder and i think the last thing you'd want to do is pull the heater box back out to change the heater core

Thanks!

Brad Penn is now known as Penn Grade and that’s what I use in my classics. I order it though summit but it is also on the shelf at my Auto Value parts store. 30 weight would be what you want. My trans guy tells me ATF+4 and that I shouldn’t be picky about brands. I use dot 5 brake fluid as long as the old dot 3 has been evacuated. It works fantastic, doesn’t absorb moisture like the others and won’t screw up your paint if you happen to spill or splash some. Prestone 50/50.

Sounds good, thanks for the tips!

Don't overthink it, you might hurt yourself! It's a car, as long as it's fresh it won't know the difference!
Oil? What the cam Mfgr. recommendations on what to use, I bet you didn't ask them?
Coolant? Use what and as much as you want, as long as it's green!
Tranny? What's the builder recommend you use, I doubt if you ever asked them either?
What's the brake Mfgr. recommend, otherwise dot4.
P.S.? Use what you want as long as the bottle says "power steering" fluid on it!
This isn't rocket science your dealing with, it's a car!

Very true :)
 

73Coupe

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I second the 'don't overthink it' mantra here.

Being in your same climate (although today it's a rare 100 degrees here) I keep it simple with 10w-30, 50/50 green coolant, Dot 3, and ATF+4 (which was recommended by the 727 expert Keith Long). I'm sure Dextron ATF works just as well too.
All Napa brand, usually.
Tip: Wal-Mart usually has the best prices on oil in 5 quart jugs. BUT sometimes Nappa has these on sale for less than $20. Always ask what's on sale at the counter or check their flyers. Get yours!
 

Isaiah Estrada

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I second the 'don't overthink it' mantra here.

Being in your same climate (although today it's a rare 100 degrees here) I keep it simple with 10w-30, 50/50 green coolant, Dot 3, and ATF+4 (which was recommended by the 727 expert Keith Long). I'm sure Dextron ATF works just as well too.
All Napa brand, usually.
Tip: Wal-Mart usually has the best prices on oil in 5 quart jugs. BUT sometimes Nappa has these on sale for less than $20. Always ask what's on sale at the counter or check their flyers. Get yours!

Thanks for the input! Can agree on the hot weather, it's sizzling here in SM too. So close to starting this car up, but have to take my transmission back to the builder in Paso due to something wrong with the selector shaft on it. Really hoping to get this thing going soon!
 

65sporty

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The guy's seem to have covered it. I do like the break in oil for first start up and use something high in zinc or your favorite oil with zinc additive after that.
 

i_taz

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Brad Penn is now known as Penn Grade and that’s what I use in my classics. I order it though summit but it is also on the shelf at my Auto Value parts store. 30 weight would be what you want. My trans guy tells me ATF+4 and that I shouldn’t be picky about brands. I use dot 5 brake fluid as long as the old dot 3 has been evacuated. It works fantastic, doesn’t absorb moisture like the others and won’t screw up your paint if you happen to spill or splash some. Prestone 50/50.
Gibbs GP-1 uses the same American Refining Grps additive package Brad Penn originally used. There's some conflicting info on whether Penn Grade uses the same formula anymore. I haven't used Penn Grade
but the Gibbs is green like the Brad Penn was.
 

detmatt

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Gibbs GP-1 uses the same American Refining Grps additive package Brad Penn originally used. There's some conflicting info on whether Penn Grade uses the same formula anymore. I haven't used Penn Grade
but the Gibbs is green like the Brad Penn was.
It’s still just as green as it was before.
 
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