Fun with sway bar links

MetalManiacAZ

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Suspension rebuild progress continued on Betty White, my '66 300. I went to install the new sway bar bushings, courtesy of @mobileparts and in the package, there was a small nut and bolt. I checked the FSM, and sure as shit, the diagram shows a two piece link held together with a tab and bolt. Mine were factory welded so I just cut the bottom at the seam, drilled through the top, and spot welded them together. Does anyone know if the two piece link was a Mopar serviceable replacement part?

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Davea Lux

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Mopar FSMs used to show that when that bushing failed, the entire stabilizer was replaced as a unit. It came complete with the welded support brackets and bushings installed. Later, the two piece bushing retainer that bolted together became available as a lower cost option. The two piece unit would be considered a factory service part, factory installed OEM units on new vehicles were always the welded type. Moog and others also made the bolt together units.

Dave
 

detmatt

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Here’s an instruction sheet.
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MetalManiacAZ

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Interesting stuff. The factory fitment of the lower piece was crude at best but did its job for this long!

On the removal, a hacksaw was not required for removal after 56 years of Arizona summers. A large screwdriver made quick work of rubber removal. Thanks guys!
 

Gerald Morris

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I never had trouble with the factory bushing retainer. Big beater flat screwdrivers work well for removing the old rubber, and a little soap applied to the swaybar and link inner surface eases in the new rubber. Once the mud dries up here, new rubber for ALL the front suspension is on the Agenda.
 

detmatt

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That’s what I did too without too much trouble. I haven’t used a manual hacksaw in years!:lol:
 

MetalManiacAZ

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I never had trouble with the factory bushing retainer. Big beater flat screwdrivers work well for removing the old rubber, and a little soap applied to the swaybar and link inner surface eases in the new rubber. Once the mud dries up here, new rubber for ALL the front suspension is on the Agenda.
Gerry, that's all well and good but then I wouldn't get to fire up the Millermatic 35 and play with fire, sparks, and high voltage current (insert Tim Taylor grunts here)!
 

Gerald Morris

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Gerry, that's all well and good but then I wouldn't get to fire up the Millermatic 35 and play with fire, sparks, and high voltage current (insert Tim Taylor grunts here)!

Gustavus te non disputandum.... Ever try THERMITE welding? It's handy for all sorts of stuff.. I've seen exhaust repair kits that include a smidgen of the stuff.....
 
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