1. bluefury361

    bluefury361 Old Man with a Hat

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    Has anyone else experienced problems getting gas to flow from the tank to the fuel pump?
    I've had this issue before and could not figure a logical reason for it. After going over all the reasons fuel would be blocked and trying every method to gain fuel flow, it would just start flowing right at the brink of frustration.
    My 67 Polara has a new fuel tank & pickup/sender, all new rubber hose, a good steel line and vented cap but came to me running off a 1 gal gas jug in the engine comp. Car sat for 10 years. I'll get into it next week, just looking for some insite.
     
  2. BLUPORT

    BLUPORT Carpe Diem Cras FCBO Gold Member

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    Mouse nest in the gas tank blocking the fuel pickup?
     
  3. commando1

    commando1 Mr. Normal FCBO Gold Member

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    How is your fuel delivery from the tank when the cap is removed?
     
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  4. stubs300

    stubs300 Senior Member

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    You make no mention of a new fuel sock, was that replaced or not? Can you blow air through the system?
     
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  5. bluefury361

    bluefury361 Old Man with a Hat

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    I'll be up where the car is Mon or Tues and will get on it then. I remember having trouble establishing fuel flow after replacing component's or on a car that has sat for a long period in the past.
     
  6. Ripinator

    Ripinator Senior Member

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    I swear. . . Its almost like you hafta prime the system sometimes.
     
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  7. HWYCRZR

    HWYCRZR Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Have you blown any air through your lines disconnected from fuel tank to the fuel pump? You said you replaced all the rubber lines, so unless a clamp is loose you shouldn’t be sucking air through there. Also I believe there is a check valve in the fuel pump that is supposed to prevent the fuel from draining back to the tank. I believe the manual at least 68’ talks about how to check it. A small hand pump vacuum gauge could be your friend. As said above. Try it with your cap off or loose first.
    I think $45 at Oreilly
    image.jpg
     
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  8. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Well-Known Member

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    Like we talked about on the other current post, the tiniest "suction activated" leak in the line will pull air instead of gas, yet not leak gas at all.

    Or it's that mouse nest in the tank.....
     
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  9. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    There has also been ongoing issues with the made in China crap fuel pumps sold at Blotto Zone and Car Crap. These pumps are easily corroded by the ethanol blended fuels and check valve failures are common. Unhook the fuel line at the filter and see if you can blow air backwards thru the pump. If you can, the check valve is dead and you will need a new pump. The numbers for Carter replacements are still available thru their website.

    Dave
     
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  10. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Well-Known Member

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    Dave, I was under the impression (pretty much conjured up inside my own head with zero corroborating evidence) that "new made" products--even for old style parts like our fuel pumps--weren't sensitive to ethanol. Wrongo?

    Maybe I assumed this because new stuff like lawn mowers, etc use modern materials in the fuel system like modern E10 cars.

    Blotto Zone? :D
     
  11. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Do you prefer Auto Bone?


    It depends on where the pumps are made, I have some first hand knowledge of the Chinese made pumps as I had two of them fail over winter before I switched to Real Gas in the resting cars, I also quit using those pumps. Never had that problem with Carter pumps. Most modern diaphragm pumps have ethanol compatible rubber parts, that does not mean the metal parts such as the check valve will not corrode. If you decide to invest in a small vac pump, you can try blocking the rubber hose where it hooks into the sending unit for the tank. Pump the fuel pump end up to about 15psi vacuum and see if it will hold vacuum. If the vacuum drops off fast, that probably means you have a pin hole from rust in one of the steel lines. There was a section of steel line that runs thru the back of the stub and cars in the rust belt were notorious for a rusty line in that location.

    Dave
     
  12. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Well-Known Member

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    10-4 on the ethanol issues. I figgered that everything was updated by now (like if you buy an aftermarket electric fuel pump, for instance) but Auto Bone Chinee is another story.

    And to bluefury, I'm sure you know that all the steel lines (and clamps and fasteners and everything else) is/are available from Inline Tube and probably Classic. I replaced everything on my car a few months ago from tank to carb. There's the long one from tank to under the passenger door, and then the one Dave mentioned thru the stub.
     
  13. 1970FuryConv

    1970FuryConv Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Tried inline tube for prebent fuel lines 1970-1972 Fury. Not finding anything. Not for power disc brakes either. Do they make this stuff for Fusies? If not, do you have a source? Thanks!
    Product List – Inline Tube
     
  14. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Well-Known Member

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    They made it for my Fusie last summer. I don't see it on their website, which is a terrible mess. I would call them, but from my experience the "phone answerer" won't know what you're talking about regarding a 70 Fury. You'll need to drill down with the right guy to find a match. If I had a 70 fury that needed a full fuel line setup, I'd buy the Chrysler item and "cut to fit", being as it will be longer than you need. The critical bend is the "over the axle" area, and my guess is that it should be quite similar across the model lines. The "through the stub" piece should be the same for all Cbods.

    My full kit required some eyeballing and hand bends to get it to fit just right, but I'm quite happy with the results. Three seconds of cranking after two weeks sitting and it's VROOOM!
     
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  15. cantflip

    cantflip Old Jagoff with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    A little known addendum to Murphy's law tells us its hard to break the siphon when you want it to stop dripping, and even harder to reestablish it once you want it.

    Most of the the time when I've had problems, it all came back to one scrap of old hose I'd left... thinking it looked good and couldn't be the problem. Ethanol can screw up an old hose pretty good, but before that, dry rot was the common culprit.
     
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  16. bluefury361

    bluefury361 Old Man with a Hat

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    My thoughts to Jeff. I haven't actually tried anything yet. Will get into it next week. I was just picking y'all's heads before I got to it based on past experience.
    Thanks to all who contributed. I think the bases got covered.
     
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  17. Gerald Morris

    Gerald Morris Well-Known Member

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    Sooo right! I suffered from fuel flow interruption this past spring, and wound up replacing the pump w a Carter purchased from NAPA, and 8 ft. of Gates rubber fuel line replacing rusted out steel from the point just beneath the passenger door up to the pump. There had been an earlier replacement of the same sort there, and no doubt of the deterioration of the rubber line there, BUT....

    5 inches had been installed 2 yrs ago at the fuel sending unit to fuel line junction. Guess WHERE the problem was! Replacing that crucial bit re-established good fuel flow from tank to carburetor, eliminating all the small symptoms of inadequate fuel flow I'd experienced over the past year, and which became serious this spring.

    Mathilda now idles smoothly at 500 rpm, and accelerates VERY nicely sans any hiccups.

    Ethanol, being hygroscopic assures that atmospheric water vapor will get sucked into your fuel. Aside from running pure, moonshine-free fuel, the best thing for it is to periodically empty your tank (as close to it as possible without running empty and sucking tank dirt into the system!) and keep your fuel fresh. There should be some measure involving strong base salts one can contrive as a drying agent which might mitigate fuel moisture, but care to avoid corrosion needs be taken. Perhaps some drying agent which can be introduced to the tank from the filling tube, and withdrawn periodically will work.