Getting into C-Bodies

Shazbot

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Lately find myself admiring the 70-72 300's and Furys. After going on a day long cruise in my 67 Belvedere with a 440 on the highway I find myself really thinking a C-body would be much nicer, smoother and quieter on the highway.

Wanting to stay in a 2 door with a big block what advise would c-body owners pass along?
 
I've owned a lot of cars... And you are right, the C body will have the best ride.

Buy the best car you can afford. There are some good bargains out there, but a project car will just cost you more than buying one that's all done and real nice. The last two cars I've bought have given me a lot of pleasure. Both were running, driving, complete cars. You could take them anywhere the way they were. What I did was take on small projects for each car. The cars were always just a few hours from being drivable. Except for the paint on the 300 there was no huge projects. Even the paint work was farmed out to a shop where I knew it would be done. There was never a car sitting in my garage in a huge pile of parts.

My 300.
9E8GwoZ.jpg
 
It will always be cheaper in the long run to buy a quality car to start with.

Dave
 
I've owned a lot of cars... And you are right, the C body will have the best ride.

Buy the best car you can afford. There are some good bargains out there, but a project car will just cost you more than buying one that's all done and real nice. The last two cars I've bought have given me a lot of pleasure. Both were running, driving, complete cars. You could take them anywhere the way they were. What I did was take on small projects for each car. The cars were always just a few hours from being drivable. Except for the paint on the 300 there was no huge projects. Even the paint work was farmed out to a shop where I knew it would be done. There was never a car sitting in my garage in a huge pile of parts.

My 300.
View attachment 376911
I've never been in a convertible (I did ride in a Model A Roadster with side curtains reckon it was, a rainy and windy night, not good!) so what's it like with wind noise at highway speeds?
 
I've never been in a convertible (I did ride in a Model A Roadster with side curtains reckon it was, a rainy and windy night, not good!) so what's it like with wind noise at highway speeds?

A convertible is way more fun for the buck. Thing is, when the top goes down, the price goes up. Wagons are a great way to go also.
 
Nothing quite matches the ability to drop the top and cruise. I think the deciding factor is what you want the car for. I don’t use mine as a daily driver and if I did I would probably go with a hardtop.
The noise isn’t bad and I don’t mind it at all. The worst part is the black interior when climbing in.
 
Lately find myself admiring the 70-72 300's and Furys. After going on a day long cruise in my 67 Belvedere with a 440 on the highway I find myself really thinking a C-body would be much nicer, smoother and quieter on the highway.

Wanting to stay in a 2 door with a big block what advise would c-body owners pass along?

:welcome:I was a true blue B body guy way back to the 60's. About 20 years ago I picked up a really nice 64 300 convertible that had been stored for 15 years. Although not officially a C body, same premise. I got it up and running good and started driving it. It didn't take long before My 69 A12 Road Runner, 69 GTX and 70 6bbl Road Runner were being left behind in the garage in favor of the big Chrysler. The B body's finally went to new homes and I've been in a C body ever since.
 
I'm in the same boat as CRV on the convertible side. Also find some cars have such great roof lines that gets lost with a drop top. Still for the right car I wouldn't pass up the opportunity.

Definitely A/C would be a must have just not the auto temp I've read so many "nice" things about on the forum
 
I've never been in a convertible (I did ride in a Model A Roadster with side curtains reckon it was, a rainy and windy night, not good!) so what's it like with wind noise at highway speeds?
It's actually reasonably quiet with the top down. But with the top up, it's not as quiet as a hardtop.

There other issues though...Freshly fertilized fields and dead skunks in the middle of the road type of things. You're only a box cutter away from being broken into. They rattle more and the sun beats the crap out of the interior. Getting caught in traffic in the hot sun. Sun burning the tops of your thighs if your wearing shorts. Nothing like getting back into your car that's been sitting in the sun and you can't touch the steering wheel.... And you have to keep your comments to yourself about pedestrians (I have to remind Mrs. Big John about that). Drive into a bad neighborhood? Locking the door isn't gonna do much.

Love them though... They are a lot of fun.
 
The other thing with a vert is that they are a summertime car. Mold tries to grow everywhere if you leave one out in the rain and they generally leak water in a lot of places. Mopars usually leak around the rear of the top into the trunk so floor rot so is on the horizon unless the car is kept dry. Most Mopar verts also will have some cowl shake, all part of the experience. But they are still very pleasurable to drive and I will always drive a vert on a nice day over a hard top.

Dave
 
It's actually reasonably quiet with the top down. But with the top up, it's not as quiet as a hardtop.

There other issues though...Freshly fertilized fields and dead skunks in the middle of the road type of things. You're only a box cutter away from being broken into. They rattle more and the sun beats the crap out of the interior. Getting caught in traffic in the hot sun. Sun burning the tops of your thighs if your wearing shorts. Nothing like getting back into your car that's been sitting in the sun and you can't touch the steering wheel.... And you have to keep your comments to yourself about pedestrians (I have to remind Mrs. Big John about that). Drive into a bad neighborhood? Locking the door isn't gonna do much.

Love them though... They are a lot of fun.
Think I'll stick with conventional cars...:lol:
 
I had them all...A,B,E,F,M bodies yet I always venture back to the C's.
The best advice had already been given..buy the best you can get.
Maggie and I managed to buy a running/driving 69 Fury that sat in storage for years.
Luckily no body work but needed mechanical and interior work.
Link to thread..
Meet Maggie May!
Even though I did a full blown resto on another car..I prefer complete cars that need little work..
Welcome and good luck!!
 
I agree with what has been said above. I was really lucky and found a 70k mile 69 Newport close to home for a good price a few months ago. Had it up and driving within 2 weeks. Now just working on the little things every weekend, just put on the 4 barrel today, and deciding how I want her to look when I put a fresh paint job on her. Just take you time and see what shows up.
 
Ideally a car that has been well kept and off the road for some time is the type of car I like to aim for. That way I am the one to go through the basic mechanicals needed to become a safe and roadworthy driver. This way I'm not relying on someone else's work. If anything goes wrong, with a repair or new part...its on me.

Good luck with your search. I've had every platform but an E body. C body cars just do it for me. Late 70s Cordobas(B body) and Lebarons(M body) being a close second.
 
I've read on this forum, when it comes to the fuselage era, the "newer" the car, the more comfortable the ride and the better the build quality.
So a '72-'73 would be preferred over a '69-'70.
 
The advantages have been well documented but other than cost and time, the other reason to buy a nice, complete, RUST FREE car is that usually you have to find used or NOS parts. The market is improving but there's not a lot of folks making parts for C-bodies. AMD doesn't make parts for C-bodies and stay away from C2C. I didn't follow this advice and am attempting a full, complete restoration. I've been working on it since 2013, most of that time gathering parts.
 
There is a lot of very good information listed aleady. Totally agree best you can afford and complete.

Too me these cars shine on the highways. Mine will cruise all day at 80, but realized if there is not documented work on the suspension and steering box, this will need to be done to achieve, taking your favorite couch out for a drive, ride.

Brakes and fuel system is the other area if not documented will need to be completely gone through.

If you are comfortable and enjoy these tasks find a solid rust free car. if not like everyone has stated you will be ahead if you can find a nice driver with most of these tasks already completed.
 
Lately find myself admiring the 70-72 300's and Furys. After going on a day long cruise in my 67 Belvedere with a 440 on the highway I find myself really thinking a C-body would be much nicer, smoother and quieter on the highway.

Wanting to stay in a 2 door with a big block what advise would c-body owners pass along?
Welcome!
I had always wanted a huge convertible. I spent some time looking, and Lincoln Continentals, mid-60’s Cadillacs and MoPars were in my interest.
I found Shamu 69 Fury III vert), she was pricey, but beautiful. Later, I found Elwood (68 Fury II sedan) locally. Elwood needs considerable work, but I drove it onto the trailer when I bought him.
Shamu, albeit is very nice, but still needs some work (AC, some electrical work). I have been wrenching on cars for 40+ years as my need (do it yourselfer) and as a hobby.

My advice is to 1) find what esthetically appeals to you, what you can afford and do it. I have not been on this forum a long time, but the people here are great and have helped me a lot in learning and understanding these vehicles.
Good luck in finding your vehicle!
 
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