Heavy Metal

67newport

Old Man with a Hat
Joined
Dec 20, 2014
Messages
14,744
Reaction score
39,706
Location
eastern oh

The Kempton Park Steam Engines (also known as the Kempton Great Engines) are two large triple-expansion steam engines, dating from 1926--1929, at the Kempton Park waterworks, Middlesex, London. The were manufactured by Worthington-Simpson. Each engine is of a similar size to that used in RMS Titanic and rated at about 1008 hp. They each pumped 19 million gallons of water a day, to supply north London with drinking water taken from the River Thames. These are the largest triple expansion engines still running in the world! They were the last working survivors when they were finally retired from service in 1980. Here is one of the engineers engaging the barring engine, into the fly wheel in order to line the pistons of the main engine in the correct position for the admission of steam, to start. A truly remarkable sight, showing the years of dedicated restoration work to get the engine running again. Well worth a visit, check their web site for live steaming weekends.
 

67newport

Old Man with a Hat
Joined
Dec 20, 2014
Messages
14,744
Reaction score
39,706
Location
eastern oh
060030e426a6e36ef1b187356df74e7d11477bf8.jpg
 

MoPar Maniac

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
758
Reaction score
550
Location
St. Charles county, MO
It only identified the ship.
Your commentary said it is the only remaining ship from WW I, which is incorrect.

Its okay to make a mistake. We won't look down on ya for it.
 

Old Mike

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2018
Messages
707
Reaction score
1,503
Location
Overbythere
6CBC226F-8F89-496E-8197-90C2EB94302B.jpeg
Pratt and Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major, nicknamed “the corncob”. 28 cylinders, 56 spark plugs, 4360 cu. in., dry weight 3,800 pounds. 5.75” bore, 6” stroke, 6.7:1 compression ratio, up to 4300 h.p. in final development. Among the planes it powered was the Convair B-36.
 

amazinblue82

Old Man with a Hat
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2014
Messages
7,813
Reaction score
13,481
Location
Michigan
those radial aircraft engines ... from beginning till jets overtook them .. were remarkable machines. i even heard there was a wooden radial at one time.

Anyway, i marvel at the ingenuity and engineering 60 to 90 years ago. reading about what they did to even manufacture them .. really cool.

they are sprinkled throughout this thread, alone, running at night, and in the planes they powered. :)
 

BigblueC

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2015
Messages
1,647
Reaction score
2,134
Location
NC
those radial aircraft engines ... from beginning till jets overtook them .. were remarkable machines. i even heard there was a wooden radial at one time.

Radials are an interesting, and often pretty engine. Here's a wooden model of a radial engine and a good explanation of how everything runs. I think this guy does a good job.


 

amazinblue82

Old Man with a Hat
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2014
Messages
7,813
Reaction score
13,481
Location
Michigan
Radials are an interesting, and often pretty engine. Here's a wooden model of a radial engine and a good explanation of how everything runs. I think this guy does a good job.




ah thanks.

as i think about it, I am 99.999999% sure no such thing as a practical wooden IC engine able to seriously power anything..

That is a really cool wooden model though! :)
 

Snotty

Senior Member
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Messages
4,212
Reaction score
3,104
Location
Chico, California
The 4360 was my Dad's favorite engine! He was a Specialist on it, as well as the 3350, the B-29 engine. The 4360 was also used on the B-50, the Convair Connie (although not supercharged), the Spruce Goose, and others.

This picture is blurry, for which I apologize, but here is my Dad's 4360 Graduation Class, some time around 1953. He is the second from the left on the bottom.

SCAN0060.JPG
 

Old Mike

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2018
Messages
707
Reaction score
1,503
Location
Overbythere
When I was in the Air Force, I was a crew chief on KC-135As. I actually worked on the one in this photo, tail #38029, only back then it had Pratt and Whitney J-57-59Ws, not these big fans. Back then, the Guard Units we’re still flying KC-97Ls and they would occasionally stop in at the base I was stationed at. They also had the big 4360s. The sound they made while they were taxiing by was absolutely the best. BTW, this the first time I ever looked through photos of these tankers on line and found one that I worked on.
2489C1AC-9593-4001-AD86-60DC281F9E50.jpeg
F93C36A5-E04B-47AD-8EA4-7C316D9907DB.jpeg
The 4360 was my Dad's favorite engine! He was a Specialist on it, as well as the 3350, the B-29 engine. The 4360 was also used on the B-50, the Convair Connie (although not supercharged), the Spruce Goose, and others.

This picture is blurry, for which I apologize, but here is my Dad's 4360 Graduation Class, some time around 1953. He is the second from the left on the bottom.

View attachment 414979
 
Last edited:
Top