Not Mopar Or C-Body Related BUT Restoration Related.....

Is JB Weld OR A Glaze & Putty Good?

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 1 100.0%

  • Total voters
    1

SportFury70

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Please keep in mind, I also asked this question on FBBO.....

As some of you may or may not know, my other hobby besides cars is old tractors. I love them just like Mopars and have from a very young age. I unfortunately don't have any Mopars....yet, besides my daily driver but I do have a tractor I'm currently restoring.

The tractors gas tank has 2 small holes in it, one is like a tip on a fork if that makes sense and the other is a little smaller than that. I am on multiple tractor forums and one member on one of the forums says to use JB Weld to fix the holes, and another member on another one of the forums says to use a glaze and spot putty from AutoZone.

My stepdad says JB Weld is not really that good for the gas tank because it could crack over time then the gas tank will be leaking gas all over my new paint job when the tractor is all done and painted, so he technically says don't use JB Weld and that I want something that will last forever so bring it to our local radiator repair shop who also repairs gas tanks

In my opinion though, if I could use something like to JB or the putty stuff to fix it myself to save a little money on this project I would like to do it.

My questions are 1) is JB Weld OR the glaze and putty from AutoZone any good for my gas tank holes?, 2) should I use one or the other?, OR 3) should I listen to my stepdad and bring it to the radiator shop?

Thank you to everyone for their help in advance!
tank 1A.jpg
tank 2A.jpg
 

CBODY67

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BEST long-term reliable fix would be "at the radiator shop" where they braze over the holes, file things down, etc.

JBWeld is a great product, but I'm not totally sure that it is "fuel rated". No knowledge of the AutoZone items, but if they are body repair related, NO dice.

Enjoy!
CBODY67
 

65sporty

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Solder them shut or solder a small piece of copper over the hole. You have to tin the tank first so the solder will stick to it. Like CBODY67 said a radiator shop should be able to do it. There is always gas tank renew
 

Xenon

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The "glaze and putty from AutoZone " is basically lacquer putty...
NOT good for oil or gas... Especially with todays gasoline with heavy alcoholic content..
The best thing is do the radiator shop thing...
You can save some money now and spend more later or spend more now and not spend later....
BTW.. Now is *much* cheaper than later......
 

3175375

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I used JB weld on the bottom of a 62 Corvair station wagon gas tank and it worked well.
The holes were right on the bottom and I placed a floor jack on some cardboard below the repair area, to keep the JB weld in place.
I drove the car for a few years after the repair and then traded the car for bodywork on my Mustang.
I don’t know of any problems with the repair. It’s been over 20 years and I believe that the car is still on the road, somewhere in Arizona.
 

Big_John

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I would solder both holes. The one at the filler should be able to be just soldered up, but the other hole will need some additional filler metal.

I have seen holes like that filled with a sheet metal screw and then the sheet metal screw was soldered to seal it. That made for a very good and not too ugly repair. Since you are doing a restoration, that's probably not an option, so a piece of sheet metal, maybe brass (get it at a hobby shop) would work. A little massaging with a hammer to bring it level with the surface and cover it with JB Weld, sand and finish.

I wouldn't use JB Weld as the repair. IMHO, that's a temporary type repair and will eventually fail. Great for the beater car that only has to last through winter, but not for a good restoration.

Time you learned how to solder anyway. My small butane torch, Stay Clean acid flux and 60/40 lead solder would be my weapons of choice. . But a propane torch and flux and solder from the plumbing dept at Lowes Depot will get the job done.

Clean the area, apply the flux, heat and touch the solder to the area. Now wipe the solder with a rag while it's still molten. That will "tin" the area and make the solder for your repair "stick". A little patience (the torch can get it too hot) and you'll have a 100% repair that will last. Clean the flux off real well (inside and out) with soap and water.

There's a bunch of videos on YouTube on how to do this. Search "Solder repair gas tank".
 

1970FuryConv

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I used a JB Weld kit on a 70 Fury gas tank. It lasted a couple of years until I parted the car. Of course, solder/weld is a stronger long term solution.
 

65sporty

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If you solder it yourself, either run exhaust into the tank or water to get the fumes out. Argon would also work
 

volksworld

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epoxy type fixes need surface area to bond...they dont stick that well so they need to cover a good sized spot ...and i think what you would have to build up to make a successful repair would interfere with the threads on the filler neck...brass could be ground back to the original shape
 

thethee

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I'm not familiar with old tractors so I'll just ask, what kind of fuel are you running? That could be a determining factor in what repair you want to try.
 

PH27L7

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They do make a 2-part epoxy specifically for fuel tanks. I've used it in a pinch & it works fine. Don't know if it would hold up as well as solder / braze / welding.
 

Imperial dude

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Take it to the radiator shop, you know it will be fixed right
If you use JB weld, even if it ends up lasting forever and never fails
There will always be this little voice in the back of your head " how long is it going to last?"
Peace of mind is a priceless thing
 

SportFury70

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Good news,

I do appreciate everyone's suggestions BUT I brought the gas tank to my local radiator shop today. It should hopefully be ready this Thursday, I told the shop owners brother that I wanted to fix it with JB Weld and he too said it is no good so I am very happy I made the right decision on what to do. I will try and post some pictures of the tank when it is fixed.

Thank you all for your advice and help!
 

WSP

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My question is why are those holes there in the first place? Do/did you have rust inside? Consider a gas tank sealer. Many claim they are resistant to todays ethanol gas. I have used them on some of my motorcycles for years, and have had no problems.
 

Polara-Star

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Agreed on the non-ethanol gas, but it unfortunately is not available everywhere. i am lucky, i live in the Lakes region of Vermont, so there are lots of boats and resultingly a number of stations that offer non-ethanol premium. Good for me, since i drive a '76 Cordoba and an '85 W-150 pickup, both obviously carbureted. Glad you found a shop to make your repair, i was just gonna say i once worked at a shop where i learned a good brazing trick..... Applied to gas tanks and radiators. My boss could seal any radiator or gas tank with the right oxy-acetylene flame and a coat hanger. No lie. i still use the technique....
 

SportFury70

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My question is why are those holes there in the first place? Do/did you have rust inside?

I did have rust inside the tank yes but I got it out with some PB blaster some CLR and some rocks, and let it sit for 36 hours then rinsed it out with my garden hose
 
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