Pics of "Booster Steve" rebuilt 69-70 8.5 inch dual-diaphragm unit.

Trace 300 Hurst

Professional Tinkerer
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Messages
1,901
Reaction score
2,267
Location
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL
After borrowing a used (and rare!) 69/70 8 1/2 inch dual diaphragm from a member here (so that I could continue to move my car around for two months), I sent my unit to Booster Dewey/Steve in Portland as many of you here have already done or are planning to. Instead of a six-seven week turnaround as quoted, mine was back in about four. They under-promised and over-delivered!

The cost was a mere $200 plus $30 shipping. My shipping cost to them was about $50 (I put a high declared value on it, but they got antsy at "priceless"). Of note, I received my same unit back as promised, as I lightly stamped my initials on the bottom of the can. Besides, they don't have any cores of this booster anyway. Also of note, I did not send my check valve with the unit because I needed it for the borrowed booster. "Booster Steve" installed a new check, and that's probably routine regardless if you send a check with the unit or not.

Here's a before pic, with the borrowed unit on the left (which is currently in my car).
IMG_7632_LI.jpg


And the "unboxing", like the silly YouTubers do with their product reviews. The paint is purrrrfect.
TZFN1002.JPG


IQSM3197.JPG


IMG_7832.JPG


IMG_7828.JPG


Pushrod height was precisely 1 inch, just as it was went I sent it in.
IMG_7833.JPG


Here's the paperwork.
DLGH9038_LI (4).jpg


LVEY3518.JPG


I'll install it in a few weeks, and I doubt there will be any issues other than the drudgery of working waaaay up under the dash. Arrrrgh!

Once I do the swap, I'll be sending the borrowed unit to "Booster" and then returned directly to the rightful owner, ready for his next project.

Much thanks to @ayilar for being the go-between.
 
Last edited:

Trace 300 Hurst

Professional Tinkerer
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Messages
1,901
Reaction score
2,267
Location
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL
That looks sweet !!
Yes it does! I should point out that my booster has led a sheltered life in a New Mexico and Amarillo environment in a continuously operated car such that there was no pitting of the can. It's clear that Booster blasts the can and does a very nice semi-gloss paint job, but they can't fix pitting, so YMMV.

Come to think of it, I wonder if they do a little "bodywork" on pitted units? Or, an industrious owner might send it out for a blasting and rebuild, and have it send back bare metal. Then that owner could apply a skim coat of filler, sand it all smooth, and shoot it with a quality rattle semi-gloss. Just thinkin' out loud.
 

PH27L7

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2020
Messages
584
Reaction score
832
Location
Pittsburgh, PA
Just had mine finished a few weeks ago, nice work & perfect function. They have a good sense of of humor as well, their included "booster nuts" were M&M peanuts, my favorite!
img_0654-jpg.jpg
 

MetalManiacAZ

Well-Known Member
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2021
Messages
739
Reaction score
796
Location
Arizona
Those guys are a class act. I sent both of my DD boosters to them and at exactly 3 weeks, I was getting a call for payment. Fantastic service and workmanship. You'll be super happy once you get it on your car!
 

saforwardlook

Old Man with a Hat
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
7,104
Reaction score
11,932
Location
California
After borrowing a used (and rare!) 69/70 8 1/2 inch dual diaphragm from a member here (so that I could continue to move my car around for two months), I sent my unit to Booster Dewey/Steve in Portland as many of you here have already done or are planning to. Instead of a six-seven week turnaround as quoted, mine was back in about four. They under-promised and over-delivered!

I'll install it in a few weeks, and I doubt there will be any issues other than the drudgery of working waaaay up under the dash. Arrrrgh!

Much thanks to @ayilar for being the go-between.

Assuming that is going in your Hurst, be glad, if it was a 71 300 it would be even worse up under the dash. A couple studs are even more difficult in the 71 and up models!!

They did nice work.....................
 

Trace 300 Hurst

Professional Tinkerer
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Messages
1,901
Reaction score
2,267
Location
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL
Assuming that is going in your Hurst, be glad, if it was a 71 300 it would be even worse up under the dash. A couple studs are even more difficult in the 71 and up models!!

They did nice work.....................
Yes, the Hurst is my only Mopar.

The 71 is even FURTHER up there? Jeeze. I have every imaginable socket and swivels and extensions and wrenches and air ratchets...in 1/4" and 3/8" and 1/2" and 3/4" (!)....and it's still a bitch getting to the pedal bolt and the mounting nuts. My 68 Dart and 71 Cuda were easy.
 
Last edited:

saforwardlook

Old Man with a Hat
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
7,104
Reaction score
11,932
Location
California
When the Chrysler models got new interiors and dash panels starting with the 71 and extending through the 73 models, getting the booster out got more difficult. You will need a swivel or at least those sloppy ended extensions to get one or 2 of the nuts off the booster from the inside, way up there.

When I started working for Chrysler Engineering in Highland Park, Michigan in 1969, I was placed in a special program that allowed me to rotate through 4 departments per year for 2 years in order for me to find where I wanted to go permanent. One of the groups I chose was the instrument panel lab so I got to see how development was done. Nearly all of it was done by technicians, not engineers and they had future instrument panel designs mocked up on a bench with the panels mounted only on the ends to some uprights. This allowed the techs to access both the front and back sides of the instrument panels either standing up or sitting down, so it was easy for them to arrange and access everything. I have told this before on this site, but again, I complained to them that doesn't adequately take into account accessibility when mounted in the car and they told me to "go back to California, land of fruits and nuts", if I thought it was dumb.

So things were no different back then than they are now in terms of attitudes.
 

Trace 300 Hurst

Professional Tinkerer
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
May 27, 2018
Messages
1,901
Reaction score
2,267
Location
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL
One of the groups I chose was the instrument panel lab so I got to see how development was done.

Very interesting story, and totally in keeping with all of us who work on any machinery: "How do they expect us to remove THAT?"

A former (brilliant) coworker of mine is the dashboard/A pillar/cowling "guy" at GM for their pickups. He tells me that he soon learned that these elements AND the massive, one-piece wiring harness that passes around and through it is the absolute heart of a modern vehicle. Noises, vibrations, tight packaging, efficiency of assembly, possibility of repair....along with dozens of other key considerations are his domain. He says "It ain't easy, but it's fun."
 

Moseman

Senior Member
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
May 21, 2014
Messages
1,247
Reaction score
2,874
Location
Chancellor, SD
Very interesting story, and totally in keeping with all of us who work on any machinery: "How do they expect us to remove THAT?"

A former (brilliant) coworker of mine is the dashboard/A pillar/cowling "guy" at GM for their pickups. He tells me that he soon learned that these elements AND the massive, one-piece wiring harness that passes around and through it is the absolute heart of a modern vehicle. Noises, vibrations, tight packaging, efficiency of assembly, possibility of repair....along with dozens of other key considerations are his domain. He says "It ain't easy, but it's fun."

I agree, I buy a lot of large heavy equipment. Dozers are a prime example. The engineers make it easy to assemble the dozer on the line, but when you have to work on one, you almost have to tear the whole unit down to get at drivelines, clutches, etc. I point that out everytime I make a factory tour. Cat and Komatsu are tone deaf about a response about making it easier on the mechanics that work on them. But, I guess that makes more billable hours for a dealer serviceman. But, if your own mechanics work on it, better pack a lunch!
 

Gerald Morris

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2016
Messages
2,000
Reaction score
997
Location
Tucson
When the Chrysler models got new interiors and dash panels starting with the 71 and extending through the 73 models, getting the booster out got more difficult. You will need a swivel or at least those sloppy ended extensions to get one or 2 of the nuts off the booster from the inside, way up there.

When I started working for Chrysler Engineering in Highland Park, Michigan in 1969, I was placed in a special program that allowed me to rotate through 4 departments per year for 2 years in order for me to find where I wanted to go permanent. One of the groups I chose was the instrument panel lab so I got to see how development was done. Nearly all of it was done by technicians, not engineers and they had future instrument panel designs mocked up on a bench with the panels mounted only on the ends to some uprights. This allowed the techs to access both the front and back sides of the instrument panels either standing up or sitting down, so it was easy for them to arrange and access everything. I have told this before on this site, but again, I complained to them that doesn't adequately take into account accessibility when mounted in the car and they told me to "go back to California, land of fruits and nuts", if I thought it was dumb.

So things were no different back then than they are now in terms of attitudes.

BLESS YOU and MAJOR THANKS BRO! As engineers, it behooves us to heed much the practical data from technicians, to be SURE. Occasionally though, one MUST demonstrate a principle when techs don't understand a phenomenon, and only some Theory will do to properly predict and explain the matter.

I'm glad I got my hands dirty as a "wire jerk" first before going for my BSEE. I forced myself to learn to use practical tools, sundry trade and shop methods over 4 years before howling, "ENOUGH! NOW LET ME GO TO COLLEGE!" I've never regretted such schooling either. Too many modern engineers grow their fingernails too long, and worry about keeping them pretty. While PowerPoint slides get the $$ from the Big Customer(s), such skills don't avail when one MUST change some motor oil...

I see now I'm going to need plenty careful preparation for deleting that booster, if that's the course we're to take. It still would give the most satisfaction though.

Time to stand on my head a bit!

Maybe tonight I'll have the Babushka click a pic or 2 of me in my "gearhead yoga" mode....
 

Gerald Morris

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2016
Messages
2,000
Reaction score
997
Location
Tucson
I agree, I buy a lot of large heavy equipment. Dozers are a prime example. The engineers make it easy to assemble the dozer on the line, but when you have to work on one, you almost have to tear the whole unit down to get at drivelines, clutches, etc. I point that out everytime I make a factory tour. Cat and Komatsu are tone deaf about a response about making it easier on the mechanics that work on them. But, I guess that makes more billable hours for a dealer serviceman. But, if your own mechanics work on it, better pack a lunch!

German machinery tends toward over-engineering, making for unholy efforts necessary to repair it! I recall some of the then 60 yr old drum sanders and lathes I had to help work on at that miserable cabinet factory I was apprenticed in for one of the MOST miserable years I've lived. Come to think of it: over-engineered vehicles contributed to the defeat of the Wehrmacht when facing off contra T-34s and JV-25 tanks during what we call WW2.

MUCH of my deep love for MoPar comes from their products during the Golden Age of Detroit Iron being SIMPLE, RUGGED AND WELL engineered, not "baroque* engineering" as we see so much these daze. Cat and Komatsu show the symptoms of this period, and have MUCH company.

*Think BROKE!
 
Top