Problem with temp cable Fury 73

Swefury

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I just bought a new temp cable and now I try to put it on the car but I dont get it. I have checked the FSM and tried to look on the net but I cant seem to understand what I am doing wrong or what I am missing. In the FSM it says there should be a self adjust clip. Anybody got a photo or a somrthing. It is a 73 Custom Suburban with AC and a 400. Since I bought it it has not had a temp cable. The water valve works. I enclosed a photo how it looks.

water valve.jpg
 

Mr C

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The clip crimps the black plastic so that the steel rod can move.

Slide the black black part forward into the clip...you can see the marks on it where it was installed before.
 

Swefury

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The clip crimps the black plastic so that the steel rod can move.

Slide the black black part forward into the clip...you can see the marks on it where it was installed before.

If I do that the wire that comes out is to long so it doesnt work. If i do as the FSM says the wire is to long for the black plastic part.

Here is how the FSM says

Installation
The cable operated temperature control water
valve is equipped with a self adjusting control cable.
No adjustment is necessary after the initial installation.
(1) Place the temperature control lever, on the
instrument panel, in the Max. heat position.
(2) Position the self adjust clip on the temperature
control cable 2.0 inches from the loop at the
water valve end. Place clip with cable on the water
valve cam and snap cable housing into the retaining
clip, so that the housing projects 5/8 inch beyond the
clip.
(3) Move the temperature control lever, on the
instrument panel, to the Cool position to adjust the
control.
 

mr. fix it

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Not a common practice but I would set the high temp position on the cable and then make sure the control valve is in high position.
Clip the plastic cable jacket into place then wrap the inner spring cable around the rod protruding up from the valve.

I only did this with a universal cable or one that had a broken plastic jacket & the customer didn't want to pay for a full R&R of the cable.
 

mr. fix it

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Also, check to make sure the direction of the cable itself is in the right position.
IE: pushing when it should push and pulling when it should pull.
 

Swefury

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Not a common practice but I would set the high temp position on the cable and then make sure the control valve is in high position.
Clip the plastic cable jacket into place then wrap the inner spring cable around the rod protruding up from the valve.

I only did this with a universal cable or one that had a broken plastic jacket & the customer didn't want to pay for a full R&R of the cable.

I dont want to do that because its a NOS cable. I think it work if I do it right but I dont understand how.
 

Clover

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I dont want to do that because its a NOS cable. I think it work if I do it right but I dont understand how.
You are indeed missing a part. There is a small clip that goes between the cable wire and the valve lever. It doesn’t actually use the “eyelet” at the end of the wire. The clip allows the wire to slide to the proper position.
 
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CBODY67

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First thing I "think" I see is an aftermarket replacement water valve, unlike what's on our '72 Newport. On an OEM-style valve, the cable goes into one of the clips in #9 above. The clip goes onto the "spindle" of the valve, and can be moved in the clip, which is where the "self-adjusting" part comes in. It's not a firm attachment, but one that can move as needed.

IF your car is like our '72 Newport, it has a two-piece cable, with an a/c compressor switch in the mix, too. The a/c compressor runs ALL THE TIME, but if you move the temp lever slowly, about 1/2 way through its travel, you'll heave/feel a slight "xlick", which is the compressor switch turning off. This switch is apart and separate from the dash-mounted a/c switch.

Which is another reason the engines in these cars can feel a bit "doggy", with the a/c running all of the time, normally, even if the dash switch is "OFF".

Once you get the correct clip, open the valve manually and then move the heat lever to MAX. Let that be the total travel of things, so that's where you put the eable end into the slit in the new clip.

What I did on our '72 Newport was to move the heat lever to the right, just past the "click", then take that as "OFF" for the heat lever. Still enough water flow for good heat, at least in our DFW climate, in the winter. But all it would take to undo what I did was to move the heat lever back to "OFF", which put things back "as designed".

On these cars, when the a/c controls are "OFF", the a/c compressor still runs and the fan runs at a very slow speed. Enough to keep some air circulation through the hvac system such that when the "DEF" button is pushed, a quick cloud of moisture does not form on the inside of the windshield, before the heat arrives to evapoprate/elear it off. I guess it works. This is for the factory manual a/c systems. Not sure about the AutoTemp variations or non a/c vehicles.

Just some thoughts,
CBODY67
 

Clover

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First thing I "think" I see is an aftermarket replacement water valve, unlike what's on our '72 Newport. On an OEM-style valve, the cable goes into one of the clips in #9 above. The clip goes onto the "spindle" of the valve, and can be moved in the clip, which is where the "self-adjusting" part comes in. It's not a firm attachment, but one that can move as needed.

IF your car is like our '72 Newport, it has a two-piece cable, with an a/c compressor switch in the mix, too. The a/c compressor runs ALL THE TIME, but if you move the temp lever slowly, about 1/2 way through its travel, you'll heave/feel a slight "xlick", which is the compressor switch turning off. This switch is apart and separate from the dash-mounted a/c switch.

Which is another reason the engines in these cars can feel a bit "doggy", with the a/c running all of the time, normally, even if the dash switch is "OFF".

Once you get the correct clip, open the valve manually and then move the heat lever to MAX. Let that be the total travel of things, so that's where you put the eable end into the slit in the new clip.

What I did on our '72 Newport was to move the heat lever to the right, just past the "click", then take that as "OFF" for the heat lever. Still enough water flow for good heat, at least in our DFW climate, in the winter. But all it would take to undo what I did was to move the heat lever back to "OFF", which put things back "as designed".

On these cars, when the a/c controls are "OFF", the a/c compressor still runs and the fan runs at a very slow speed. Enough to keep some air circulation through the hvac system such that when the "DEF" button is pushed, a quick cloud of moisture does not form on the inside of the windshield, before the heat arrives to evapoprate/elear it off. I guess it works. This is for the factory manual a/c systems. Not sure about the AutoTemp variations or non a/c vehicles.

Just some thoughts,
CBODY67
In ‘72, the ac compressor should be off with the control pressed to “off”, with the standard ac system or with AutoTemp II. The auxiliary switch on the temp control is another way to turn off the ac in the standard system.
 

CBODY67

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Your orientation of "OFF" at "OFF" is what I suspected when we got our new '72 Newport with normal factory a/c. BUT the compressor would not turn off at "OFF", period. That's when I did some checking and discovered that it was supposed to run all the time, even with the "OFF" button pushed amd the "HEAT" Lever all the way to the left (i.e., "OFF"). As our car was a later production vehicle, which had the Electronic Ignition as standard, might make a difference? I just know that's how it was and what my research revealed (including from the old-line Chrysler service manager at the local dealership). Plus that they also told me that the heat cable was now a two-piece affair, rather than a single cable, as in the past. Which is also when I discovered the compressor switch in the cable mechanism.

DUE to the a/c compressor running all of the time, the TX DPS installed an additional switch on the instrument panel to manually turn off the a/c compressor "when needed". 1972 and 1973 Plymouth Fury IIIs, in that case. I saw those switches on the cars the local dealership serviced. BTAIM

Respectfully,
CBODY67
 

Swefury

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Thankyou everybody now I understand whats wrong. I´l try to find a clip and then it will hopefully be working as it shold.

Swefury
 

polarus

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Most Mopar police cars from that era have an A/C shut off switch located in the dash, it allowed the officer shut down power to the A/C unit during high speed pursuits.
 

CBODY67

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Was there a TSB with instructions of how to install the switch or was it "at the factory"? The ones I saw on the TX DPS units looked a bit "after-the-fact", as I recall.

Just curious,
CBODY67
 

Clover

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Your orientation of "OFF" at "OFF" is what I suspected when we got our new '72 Newport with normal factory a/c. BUT the compressor would not turn off at "OFF", period. That's when I did some checking and discovered that it was supposed to run all the time, even with the "OFF" button pushed amd the "HEAT" Lever all the way to the left (i.e., "OFF"). As our car was a later production vehicle, which had the Electronic Ignition as standard, might make a difference? I just know that's how it was and what my research revealed (including from the old-line Chrysler service manager at the local dealership). Plus that they also told me that the heat cable was now a two-piece affair, rather than a single cable, as in the past. Which is also when I discovered the compressor switch in the cable mechanism.

DUE to the a/c compressor running all of the time, the TX DPS installed an additional switch on the instrument panel to manually turn off the a/c compressor "when needed". 1972 and 1973 Plymouth Fury IIIs, in that case. I saw those switches on the cars the local dealership serviced. BTAIM

Respectfully,
CBODY67
I have to respectfully disagree with you. I have a ‘72 Imperial with AutoTemp II that I have rebuilt and it turns off the compressor in the “off” position, just as the FSM describes. I also do repairs on a friend and FCBO member’s non-ATC ‘72 New Yorker and it also turns the compressor off in the “off” position. The extra compressor switch on the non-ATC control is from the factory and is intended to run the ac compressor at certain times during “heat” mode when normally the compressor would not be running.
This information is all in the FSM. Somebody has done some funny wiring in your car and perhaps you have misinterpreted the FSM.
It is only the ATC cars that run the compressor in any of the four “on” positions but it is definitely off in “off”. I know these systems intimately!
 
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