Question about cylinder heads

Fishfan

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I recently swapped the intake manifold on my 318 Poly to go from a 2-BBL to a 4-BBL carburetor. Pardon me for not knowing the exact terminology but I noticed that in the cavity where the water and coolant passes through the heads that there's a thin metal rod (about the diameter of wire clothes hanger) that runs through it. What is it and what's it for? On one side it seemed dislodged from where it was supposed to be (comparing it to the other side). You can see it circled in this picture.

IMG_20220923_142814658_HDR.jpg
 

max1196

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The "coat hanger looking stuff" inside cylinder heads is from the sand-casting procedure, they helped keep the mold shaped while the iron was poured. When the sand was removed, the wires stay behind.
 

Fishfan

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The "coat hanger looking stuff" inside cylinder heads is from the sand-casting procedure, they helped keep the mold shaped while the iron was poured. When the sand was removed, the wires stay behind.
Thanks for your response. So, if I'm understanding that correctly, they serve no functional purpose in the running of the engine. The reason I ask is that, as I mentioned in the original post, one of them (on the passenger side head) was kind floating around in there, not attached to anything. I felt the other side and it seemed firmly installed. I couldn't figure out a way to attach the loose one correctly so I decided to do a delete on it. I figured the engine had been running fine so it couldn't serve a mission critical purpose and having something loose in there wasn't very appealing.
 

Gerald Morris

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Thanks for your response. So, if I'm understanding that correctly, they serve no functional purpose in the running of the engine. The reason I ask is that, as I mentioned in the original post, one of them (on the passenger side head) was kind floating around in there, not attached to anything. I felt the other side and it seemed firmly installed. I couldn't figure out a way to attach the loose one correctly so I decided to do a delete on it. I figured the engine had been running fine so it couldn't serve a mission critical purpose and having something loose in there wasn't very appealing.

You did right. Be GLAD you have a Poly! Those canted angle valves enable EXCELLENT motor respiration! Ever see Uncle Tony's video titled like "The Engine Mopar SHOULD Have Developed?" A Poly is more in the league with Ford's "Boss" or "Cleveland" heads but better due to a more substantive block, which will absorb much punishment that the thin walled Ford 335 blocks would bust on. The LA block Chrysler deployed to succeed the Poly is a cheaper engine, though still an excellent small block motor.

Research bore and stroke enhancements for your Poly. It has PLENTY iron to carve, if done right.
 

Fishfan

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You did right. Be GLAD you have a Poly! Those canted angle valves enable EXCELLENT motor respiration! Ever see Uncle Tony's video titled like "The Engine Mopar SHOULD Have Developed?" A Poly is more in the league with Ford's "Boss" or "Cleveland" heads but better due to a more substantive block, which will absorb much punishment that the thin walled Ford 335 blocks would bust on. The LA block Chrysler deployed to succeed the Poly is a cheaper engine, though still an excellent small block motor.

Research bore and stroke enhancements for your Poly. It has PLENTY iron to carve, if done right.
Thanks. Yes, I've seen that video from UTG. I actually watched it again recently.
 
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