1. RGORHAM29

    RGORHAM29 Active Member

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    e0398b08-91eb-4cf1-a833-ebc4922b4ba4-jpeg.jpg image-jpg.jpg image-jpg.jpg My daughter and I are cleaning up two part rotors that came w the disk assembly. Mics at 1.25 and 1.24. Question for all - 1. how do I separate the hub and rotors (I will dip in evaporust). 2. How do I remove seal/bearings on the back side of the rotor? Advice appreciated.
     
  2. Ross Wooldridge

    Ross Wooldridge Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    The studs are swedged (peened) to the hub, which captures the rotor. To separate properly, one has to have the swedges cut away with a swedge cutter. Some swedges are simple stake marks, and you can carefully cut them away with a dremel type tool, then drive the studs out with a wood block and a hammer. Although many will say "just pound them out", I do NOT recommend that, as it can damage and ever warp the rotor. However, other swedges are full ring type, and really need to be cut away properly, or you'll definitely ruin the rotor.

    Installing new studs properly involves having them pressed into place, however, many simply clamp the rotor and hub together and draw the new studs through by pulling them up with a lug nut. The nuts and wheel are going to hold things together regardless is the thinking, but again, I'd have it done properly if I were doing it.

    Swedge cutter:
    ST-437-500-562.jpg

    Cutting the swedge away
    cutter%201.jpg
     
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  3. 413

    413 Well-Known Member

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    Drawing them in to with a nut is the incorrect way and will stress the stud. They are meant to be pressed in from the back side.

    I agree with the swedge cutting to separate.
     
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  4. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    Those are factory assemblies, they are not supposed to be separated, you can use the swedge cutter to aid in removing damaged studs, but otherwise leave the unit in one piece. The factory only sold the assembly as a unit, so you are not going to find the hub or rotor in any of the parts books, just the complete unit. If the bearing races are going to be replaced, you can use a brass drift to pound out the old races. The new races should be pressed in with the appropriate bearing guide. Unless the existing races are pitted, leave them in place as there is no reason to take them out. The surface rust on the rotor usually is not of much concern except on the mating surface with the pads. This area should be turned on a brake lathe to get down to clean metal and then be mic'd to be sure the unit is still in spec. You can remove the old seal with a big screw driver. If your existing bearings are not pitted, reuse them. Most of the replacement bearings sold at Autobone or Carcrap are Chicom junk that will not hold up. If bearings are needed, specify Timkin bearings, if the parts house does not have them, walk away and find a parts house that does.

    Dave
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2021
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  5. cantflip

    cantflip Old Jagoff with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    You have a beautiful daughter... so allow me to try to help prevent the eventual prosthetic eyeball.

    A wire wheel is one of the MOST dangerous tools you are likely to use on a car project. The wires break off and sling with much greater force than you may imagine. It is extremely common for someone to pull a full length piece of wire from under their skin at the end of a day using one. I would recommend safety glasses/googles AND a full face shield, and perhaps some more appropriate clothing and working a little higher off the ground (low bench or table). While it is true that the faster you turn the wheel the more force it generates, folks don't always appreciate how much potential is still there at low speeds.

    Very cool that you and her are involved in this together. :thumbsup:
     
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  6. RGORHAM29

    RGORHAM29 Active Member

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    Good morning all - thanks for the tips. Reason I enjoy FCBO .
    Good news are that the studs are in good shape. My intent of “breaking them apart” was so that I could remove any rust and clean the inside bore. My concern about removing the bearing at the rear of the hub was concern that there could possibly be some dirt/sand in there...so wanted to remove, clean, inspect and repack w grease. If it does not need to be broken apart then I rather not and just make sure the bearings are good. Ross - thanks so much for the tip on the Swedges. Now I know how to change out the lugs and separate hub and rotor if I go down that path. Good points on safety first. It happens we did use some gloves and goggles afterwards.

    I soaked the rotors in some evaporust last night. I will see how that turned out and if pitting / scale is on the rotor face. I look forward to painting and getting them turned and balanced. Stay tuned.
     
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  7. CBODY67

    CBODY67 Old Man with a Hat

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    While I fully understand the orientation to get everythng cleaned up and pretty again, sometimes, there CAN be better ways to do it. As in chemically or rust removal through electrolysis (several YouTube vids on how that's done), whether engine blocks or small cast iron items).

    Once cleaned to your level of desire, then put some "metal prep" solution on it to seal it to prevent any more rust in the future, or at least lessen it. As always, when needed, handle the parts (post-solution soak) with approved nitrile gloves to protect your skin from any harmful chemicals that might be in the mix. Our skin might be "a barrier". but a porous one that will absorb things that can harm us. And follow the manufacturer's recommendations for disposal of the liquids.

    Just some thoughts,
    CBODY67
     
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  8. halifaxhops

    halifaxhops Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    I would get them cut also to make sure they are still true, nothing like a pullsating pedal while stopping. Just me.
     
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  9. FURYGT

    FURYGT Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    Why not just buy new one piece replacement rotors and new high quality bearings and seals and this way you know everything is new and you can spend your valuable time on other restoration work. I am pretty sure that I have some new old replacement stock rotors if you can't find them.

    As noted above, safety goggles are a must. One of those little wire pieces can end up in your eye.
     
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  10. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    ^This^


    Tie back the hair too! One of the more grizzly shop injuries I ever saw was long hair getting caught in a machine spindle. Granted, that wasn't a hand held drill, but it happens really fast and the results can still be bad.
     
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  11. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Old Man with a Hat

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    aaaYep one of the very first lessons in Jr. High shop class whether wood or metal was: no neck tie, jewelry, (ghetto neck pimp chains) rings, hippie long hair tied back (not me then, that wasn't till high school) ball cap/bump cap/hard hat, proper work boots, long pants, safety glasses that were sterilized in a UV cabinet (?) etc.

    You don't have to go to a Gore site to see nasty lathe, drill press, conveyor belt, and other industrial/heavy equipment accidents, where people end up as dog food, they are on YouTube.

    An what'eva you do don't grow up to be a 'Reality TV Star'!

    Race.Night.At.Bowman.Gray.S01-E03.webrip.x264.tbs_00_04_33_01.jpg

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  12. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Old Man with a Hat

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    Your correct on that for cars but for light trucks more specifically 4x4's the combined factory hub & rotor can be a pricey item. IMAO the swagging is just done too keep the rotor on the hub for the assembly line process to keep the rotors from falling off as it moved down the assembly line waiting for the calipers to be mounted. Of course this could all have been changed (back in the day disclaimer) over the years, (robotics) Same with the funny little retainer washers on the rear lug on a new car, it was kind of like 'should I put this back'? Maybe if you want to fool someone as to if the car is original low mileage, over the years I just broke them off as I figured they were there to keep the then un-adjusted drum brake drum from landing on the assembly line factory floor.


    .
     
  13. 3C's & a D?

    3C's & a D? Senior Member

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    I often find myself crouched down on the ground like that, even with an empty bench nearby. I'm not sure why, I think it has something to do with my inner cave man wanting to come out and play!
     
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  14. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Old Man with a Hat

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    I'm surprised the OP didn't obsess with the rust buildup/scale in the inner vent slots. I know I did when I got my first PK21 with Budd disc brakes. I saw all the scale almost blocking the vent channel and I immediately went about chipping it all out with a big old screwdriver and hammer for proper airflow. I was really surprised at how much rust built up in just a couple of short years back then, but being a State Troopers car and it's pretty much whole life (till I got it) were spent on the super salted super highways.

    Then it took me awhile to figure out why when I did my first tire roasting burnout is that the car would pivot around on the LF tire and do a circle burnout.
    Turned out I had 1 broken disc piston, ya'know the Budd's had a little small extension like rod for the piston and for some reason had broke right by the piston.
    I had to order those pistons back in 1970 from my n00b down the road with local high school friends at the parts counter store. Later in life I grew enough balls too walk into the dealers service department and go to the parts counter to buy/order factory parts. (a lot of dealers didn't like walkups).

    .
     
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  15. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Old Man with a Hat

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    Glad you still have that 'inner desire', I was shopping the other day and walked by one of them toilet seat extenders, I thought well lookie that it's got 'Arm Rests'!
    I also thought that I may be in the market for one of them soon.:eek:


    .
     
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  16. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    I went to a vocational high school and took machine shop courses. Served me well over the years...

    In the shop next to ours, one of the kids got a tie (he had been told to remove it) caught in a lathe. Fortunately, it was just as it was stopping so it didn't pull him into it, it did pull his face down pretty close to the part he was turning. The shop teacher heard him yelling and ran over to check on him... Seeing he was OK, he instructed everyone to leave him alone and let him think about what he had done... So he spent the rest of the class bent over with his tie wrapped up in that lathe. When it was getting time to clean up, the teacher walked over and cut his tie off.

    I had these tough WWII vets for teachers... That stuff wouldn't fly now... Safe spaces and everything...
     
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  17. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    Like these guys?

     
  18. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    We all got off on tangents and didn't answer this.

    Easiest and quickest way I've ever done this is very simple...

    When you remove the rotor assembly from the spindle, you take the nut and outer bearing off. Then you put the nut back on the spindle a few turns and pull the rotor towards you and catch the inner bearing on the nut. A quick yank and the bearing and seal are sitting on the spindle and the bare rotor is in your hands.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2021
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  19. RGORHAM29

    RGORHAM29 Active Member

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    Well - being in the architecture/construction industry I have unfortunately seen some bad things. Anyway- here is one of the rotors after a bath in the evaporust. Not bad.

    94643068-8049-481C-A476-DB6E416787B7.jpeg 56B76E2E-9AC7-491C-8E71-D41F7BFEF285.jpeg
     
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  20. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Old Man with a Hat

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    I'll top ya on that, my Jr. High metal shop teacher... well lets just say he wore a tie, had too, he's a teacher, but the lower part was tucked into his shirt below the tie clasp and he was wearing a buttoned up shop coat, but one kid that wasn't in the know questioned him about his tie (smartazz) to which all the rest of us that were "In the know" turned our heads and stare'd at the kid that would dare question this shop teacher. His question was never answered and we moved on so to say, we in the know knew that this shop teacher taught shop at the State Prison in the summer off season. LOL

    And speaking of shop coats we had to have one, think we had to even pay for them IIRC.

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