sluggish ride

'66 Fury I

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The truck FSM probably has the info, but better to get the proper one. Check out mymopar.com They have many available for free download. Lindsay
 

cuda hunter

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oh yes. of course. I even have my mopar saved on my browser.
I just forget because it doesn't have greasy finger prints and smells like a small part of my childhood
 

cuda hunter

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Too bad the harmonic balancer isn't as accessible as my M46 barracuda.

20211031_145925.jpg
 

cuda hunter

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Thanks everyone for all the great direction.
Very very appreciated!

I'm closer to this being an actual daily driver.

If only I could get an employee and not have to work 7 days a week I could get this and several others fixed up.
 

CBODY67

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As a general rule, the LONG side of the tab is advanced, the SHORT side of the tab is "After TDC".

Getting the breaker plate out is best done with the distributor removed from the engine (making sure which way the rotor is pointing when you do!!). There are two or three screws on the outer side of the housing (one holds the part number tag) which keep the breaker plate in place. Use a medium size Phillips screw driver and carefully remove them. When they are removed, the breaker plate will lift out easily (noting how the plate is situated in the housing BEFORE removal, even taking a picture of it). Have to disengage and remove the vac advance mechanism, too.

Once the breaker plate is removed, you can put the rotor back on the shaft and use that to move the advance weights. There should be one shorter and smaller-wire spring and also a heavier (thicker-wire) spring with a slot on the end of it. The lighter spring is the primary advance spring (advances quicker at lower rpm) and the heavier spring takes over for higher rpm limits (which is why it has the slot on the end). Put a little bit of penetrating oil on the pivot spindles for the weights and use the rotor to move them to free them up. Once done, a drop of two of fresh engine oil should keep things working for quite a while.

I had never taken a distributor apart, but once I did, it was easy to do. No rocket science at all. Just put things back like they were taken apart. With luck, the point gap will not need to be readjusted.

Then put the distributor back in the motor. Making sure to have the rotor pointing the same direction as before you removed it. Set the base timing as desired.

Enjoy!
CBODY67
 

mrs49

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So, my 71 newport custom 383 car is a pretty good runner. I drive him to work once a week. 30 miles with a 2000' elevation gain. 7K to 9K elevation.
The original intake was removed and an aftermarket intake was installed with an edelbrock on top of the intake. I have had the edelbrock rebuilt by a local shop. I had it rebuilt as it was a very sluggish car when trying to get it going. Once going, the car rips. Runs 80 like a dream.
But I can't get the thing to not want to fall on it's face when I push the gas.
Down shift works fine and once it down shifts it gets up and goes.
Yesterday after getting to work I parked the car. About 15 minutes go by and the stucco guys ask me to move the car. I get it started but when I try to get it moving it pretty much just dies. over and over again it just dies when put into gear. When not in gear it revs just great and sounds like a great motor with plenty of response. But once it goes into gear it pretty much fizzles out and dies. Both in reverse and in drive.
After about 4 hours of work the engine is cooled down and the car starts just fine and runs just fine with the exception of the super sluggishness.
So, seems there are two problems here. A vapor locking problem after driving it 30 miles up hill.
And the other problem of the thing being a literal slug.
I know, what kind of carb? what kind of intake?

Any suggestions?

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Be sure to look at your accelerator pump
 

CBODY67

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That it's working and how much it's emitting.
 

cuda hunter

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Makes sense. The bog or hesitation has gone away significantly with the timing adjusted and the vacuum switched. However the bog is still there. I did not get a chance to adjust it by ear. I will do that next. Then I will do the accelerator pump check.
The acclerator pump basically causes the same issue if it's not working right?
It's there to assist between port vacuum and intake vacuum?
 

CBODY67

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The accel pump helps the transition between the idle and main systems (stopping and starting, rfespectively) when the throttle is openned from idle. There is no "power valve" in the idle fuel system, as there is in the main fuel system. As the throttle is openned slowly, very little enrichment is needed, but if it happens quickly and with more intensity, more enrichment is needed. Ideally, everything should happen smoothly and seamlessly, but when it might not, although normal, we can tend to "key" on it and then it seems to be worse than ir might really be. UNLESS there is a definite "dead spot" when nothing happens.
 

cuda hunter

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There is indeed a very blank spot in the acceleration.

I just had one of the few mechanics that rebuild carb's around here rebuild it.
As I recall from doing edelbrock rebuilds in the past the rebuild kit always comes with a new accelerator pump. I suppose it could be a failed new part.
 

thethee

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Not that familiar with the 1406 but I'm sure you should be able to do a quick visual check of the accelerator pump by looking down the carb and opening the throttle manually. This should produce a strong steady stream of fuel. If not, there might m something off with the pump or linkage.
 

Bryon Mason

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I had a similar problem with my 66' 383. Hooked up the vacum gauge, gave the idle screw on the carb about a ¾ turn, woke it up enough to play with the timing some more. Runs like a champ now.
 

John Kirby

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Before removing the distributor, make a mark with a sharpie on the engine block and distributor so you can put it back in the exact same position. If you do that there is only two ways to install it, correctly or 180 degrees off. Do not crank the engine with the distributor removed. Use a can of carb cleaner and blast everything inside to clean it out thoroughly. twist the rotor to loosen up the crud while spraying the weights. Let it dry and then lube all the pivot points with some 3 in one oil. lube the point where the breaker sits on the cam SPARINGLY with some dielectric grease. Don't get any on the points. Worst case is the bushings may be worn and your timing won't be very accurate. If so it needs to be replaced. Get one from autozone, etc. Keep the old one for the springs and weights. And don't mix them up. Swap them over to keep the original advance curve. Been there, done that...
 
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