Transmission pan toque specs

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Basically looking for torque specs for the trans pan bolts on a 727 torqueflite transmission. Had a seal leak and plan to replace gasket this weekend but been looking online for the proper specs
 

CBODY67

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Of course, do the torque in steps and in a criss-cross pattern. DO ensure the pan rails are flat, too.

When using a rubberized cork gasket, I first put a thin coat of black, high-heat silicone on ALL sides of the gasket. Let it cure overnight. What this does is seal the cork and prevent any wicking action of the oil through the rubberized cork material, over time, which all such gaskets seem to be prone to do, by observation.

Then, clean any old gasket material from the case and pan. You can use a few bolts to position the pan to the case, then install the rest of them. First stage is to get it in place and positioned correctly. Then tighten each bolt gently until it stops, no more. Use wrist action, not arm action. With all of that done, then you can commence the torquing action.

Without an inch-pounds torque wrench, or even with a beam inch-pounds torque wrench, you can fell the resistance on the bolt increase just a bit. Do them all to that level, in the criss-cross pattern. Then one last pass to make sure they are a bit tighter than snug.

Then install the fluid and run the engine until it is hot enough to do an accurate fluid check. Then turn it off and let it sit overnight. Recheck for seeps the next day, fluid level too. Then put the socket on each bolt to make sure it is tight, after the cold/hot/cold cycle, for good measure. If everything works as it should, that should be the end of the pan gasket leaks. Might a seep appear, you can re-torque the bolt and clean things up with a shot of quality brake cleaner spray (or similar).

The benefit of the silicone coat, other than stopping fluid wicking, is that should you need to remove the pan, everything comes apart cleanly, from my experiences.

The amount of wrench action with your wrist can be a learned skill. Knowing just how much, watching the gasket compression, etc. can take a bit of practice to get it right, from my experiences. BUT just like spark plug changes, once you learn it, you can do it again next time. Or any other rubberized cork gasket, too.

From my experiences,
CBODY67
 
Joined
Apr 6, 2020
Messages
91
Reaction score
19
Location
San Jose, California
Of course, do the torque in steps and in a criss-cross pattern. DO ensure the pan rails are flat, too.

When using a rubberized cork gasket, I first put a thin coat of black, high-heat silicone on ALL sides of the gasket. Let it cure overnight. What this does is seal the cork and prevent any wicking action of the oil through the rubberized cork material, over time, which all such gaskets seem to be prone to do, by observation.

Then, clean any old gasket material from the case and pan. You can use a few bolts to position the pan to the case, then install the rest of them. First stage is to get it in place and positioned correctly. Then tighten each bolt gently until it stops, no more. Use wrist action, not arm action. With all of that done, then you can commence the torquing action.

Without an inch-pounds torque wrench, or even with a beam inch-pounds torque wrench, you can fell the resistance on the bolt increase just a bit. Do them all to that level, in the criss-cross pattern. Then one last pass to make sure they are a bit tighter than snug.

Then install the fluid and run the engine until it is hot enough to do an accurate fluid check. Then turn it off and let it sit overnight. Recheck for seeps the next day, fluid level too. Then put the socket on each bolt to make sure it is tight, after the cold/hot/cold cycle, for good measure. If everything works as it should, that should be the end of the pan gasket leaks. Might a seep appear, you can re-torque the bolt and clean things up with a shot of quality brake cleaner spray (or similar).

The benefit of the silicone coat, other than stopping fluid wicking, is that should you need to remove the pan, everything comes apart cleanly, from my experiences.

The amount of wrench action with your wrist can be a learned skill. Knowing just how much, watching the gasket compression, etc. can take a bit of practice to get it right, from my experiences. BUT just like spark plug changes, once you learn it, you can do it again next time. Or any other rubberized cork gasket, too.

From my experiences,
CBODY67
Okay good to know and i will follow these instructions. I purchased

Moroso GASKET, TRANS, TORQUEFLITE 727 (93110).​

 
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