USA Made??? Fuel Gauge Sending Unit

Electrical & Ignition

  1. V8Pacer

    V8Pacer Member

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    Getting ready to buy a gas tank, gas tank straps and gas gauge sending unit. Been reading lots of comments on problematic Chines made sending units. Has anyone bought the sending unit listed below which is listed on eBay? He does not say its a USA made part but he does imply it in the description.

    Fuel Gauge Sender Set for 1967-1973 MoPar C-Body & 1970-1973 Imperial | eBay
     
  2. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    Looks identical to the FG148A Spectra piece. Not surprising because I'm sure they don't make them, they just resell them.

    Half the price other places, although a quick search showed it out of stock at places like Amazon (where I bought mine)

    I've never had one done, but if you are willing to spend that much, have your old one rebuilt. Classic Vintage Page Bet it won't be any more $$. It might even be less.

    61LJ4gIz9nL._AC_SL1500_.jpg
     
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  3. Lee Robinson

    Lee Robinson Member

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    Most likely any sending units are probably made in China or Taiwan. My son just put one in a 75 Dodge truck. He had to bend the tang with
    the float as I watched fuel gauge in the truck to try to make it accurate. He also repaired the plastic tank with a soldering iron and pieces of
    plastic oil bottles. I think there are tutorials on U-tube for the tank repair. It cured the leak.
     
  4. V8Pacer

    V8Pacer Member

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  5. Pete Kaczmarski

    Pete Kaczmarski Senior Member

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    I purchased one for my '70 Fury III Summer of 2019 from www.VansAuto.com
    However I would call them to double check.
     
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  6. V8Pacer

    V8Pacer Member

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    They have 10 available on eBay. VansAuto is the eBay listing I posted above. I'll also be getting my gas tank from them.
     
  7. sprice

    sprice Member

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    That one on eBay looks like a Spectra product/ I just put one in my 68' 300. It was made in Mexico. The ohms was correct but my guages or the mechanical volt limiter was playing games so I purchased and installed the MeterMatch product. All good.
     
  8. CBODY67

    CBODY67 Old Man with a Hat

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  9. Gerald Morris

    Gerald Morris Senior Member

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    Van should be good for both tank and sender. Ironically enough, I got a sender from Van several years ago, then got the new one last year from these folks: eClassics 1962-1965 Chrysler Newport Stainless Steel Fuel Sending Unit 5/16"

    and the gauge from Auto Meter (MADE IN U.S.A.!) that made all the magic happen! Ironically enough, the gauge previously purchased from Van worked just as well with the Auto Meter gauge. I tested it one last time, thinking I was going to consign it to the scrap metal barrel and Ecce! it read FINE! So, I have a spare...

    I suspect both of my fuel sending units come from China. Be this as it may, they have nice brass floats, read consistently and with a good gauge, ACCURATELY! The sino-crap Equus gauge I had earlier just saturated as soon as anything more than 3VDC went through it.
     
  10. CBODY67

    CBODY67 Old Man with a Hat

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    To me, the whole issue of fuel gauges and how they work, other than the issues of the shape/length of the float arm, is the variable resistor in the metal box. THAT's where things happen electrically! No real dark science how it might operate as it's a simple variable resistor with a particular resistance range of operation.

    The float arm is attached to a "wiper contract" which rubs the various exposed segments of the resistor to vary the voltage which the fuel gauge sees. The ONLY wear point (other than the float arm pivot). Same concept as the instrument panel dimmer in a headlight switch mechanism. Of course, special concerns/design elements due to the ambient atmosphere of the fuel tank! Same principles of operation and design on current model year vehicles, too.

    With time, the wiper can degrade/wear and I suspect leave "a trail" of deposits on the resistor itself. Which I've seen happen even on some fuel tank modules of "still in warranty" model year vehicles.

    "Rebuilding" would, I suspect, mean a new resistor mechanism (of a particular resistance range) onto the existing sending unit? Sourcing of such an item? That could be the tricky part, for a new replacement. Obviously, there is a dedicated supply network that not just anybody could patch into. Which then means "salvage yard" for many DIY-oriented people.

    Obviously, the resistance values have a range of model years they would be common for, which might narrow the field of possible vehicles. KEY thing would be how many modern vehicles use that same resistance value. Which might generate a supply network of recent OEM replacement parts/gauge sending units. In some cases, I believe the gauge units could be purchased separately from the total fuel tank module? Would not really matter the OEM brand, just the resistanace values used. This could well be "the secret" that the rebuilders use?

    Perhaps some members with greater knowledge of the resistance values needed might define the resistance values vs model years information? Or how to best clean the resistor contacts from possible erosion from the wiper arm's contact or from modern fuels?

    I will concede that there are some things best-not-jacked-with and fuel tank sending units could well be one of them. Leaving the work to entities whose company insurance could cover any possible problems with their products, for example. On the other hand, swapping out the resistance assembly, replicating all existing electrical connections to at least OEM standards, with quality mechanical interfaces with the float arm amd any electrical connections, might be more doable than suspected. Which would make long-term-related quality control of the parts exchange operation an issue. Which could well venture into the capabilities/orientations of those doing the field replacements rather than purchasing a new unit from a trusted vendor.

    Sharing information of what has worked/not worked and from which vendor, what part number, and when purchased for which vehicle could be beneficial?

    Just some thoughts. PROCEED AT YOUR OWN RISK.
    CBODY67
     
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  11. Toolmanmike

    Toolmanmike Super Moderator Staff Member

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