How many New Yorker's Left?

Payton

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I have ran two in derby and I have two fresh ones one of them use a driver :

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77newyorker440

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I have ran two in derby and I have two fresh ones one of them use a driver :

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Out of curiosity, how hard was it to pull that engine? I am planning on pulling mine next summer so I can repaint her in Mopar Blue since it had a colossal oil leak that hurt the paint. Also, our New Yorkers are the same color, and I love the flag in the background, I have the same one hanging in my room.
 

ayilar

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How many New Yorkers, especially the 77's, are left? (...) I know of 3, including my own, in the state of Virginia, but I am sure there are way more out there.

Here is one.

that's a bit of a moving target. You could start by tracking the cars owned by members of this forum and put up an internet site where non-members can register their cars. Then you know how many cars are being cared for.
Excellent idea. Expect to spend some time (ask me how I know), but it’s worth it.
 

commando1

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Out of curiosity, how hard was it to pull that engine?
Depends on knowing the issues before-hand.
The pointy bumper gets in the way.
If you pull the tranny with it, you have to drop the tranny crossmember which in itself is no big deal but reinstalling it (for a first timer) sucks because the torsion bars twists the unibody without the crossmember.
The hood has to come of, of course, but I bet you can't get away without chipping the paint while wrestling with the hood torsion bars. Betcha can't.
That's about it.
 

75LandYacht

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Out of curiosity, how hard was it to pull that engine? I am planning on pulling mine next summer so I can repaint her in Mopar Blue since it had a colossal oil leak that hurt the paint. Also, our New Yorkers are the same color, and I love the flag in the background, I have the same one hanging in my room.
If you’ve NEVER pulled a motor before. Take lots of pics from ALL angles and label the Vac hoses and wires so know what goes where when putting it back in.. ESPECIALLY if your car has Auto Temp..... my 2cents.
 

kmccabe56

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maybe 10 percent?
10% is tremendously optimistic. A really GOOD survival rate is 5%, but most are in the 2-3% range. The exception to this is cars that were known to be rare when they were new, and were preserved because of the known rarity. Think hemi anything from 1966 on. Rarity is a conversation point, it's not an indicator of value. Everybody remembers Challenger SE hardtops from 1970 and wants one with a "B" block engine or bigger. But who wants one with a /6? There were 7 of those built.
Years ago there was a fellow claiming to have a one of Coronet R/T convertible. Turns out he was half right. There were two.
 

JIM ROPER

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Good Afternoon,
I was talking about my car with my grandparents the other day, and they posed the question to me: How many New Yorkers, especially the 77's, are left? I know that 45,252 four doors were built and 16,875 two doors, which means that, in total, 62,127 New Yorkers were built for the 1977 model year. Does anyone have any estimates on how many are left? I know of 3, including my own, in the state of Virginia, but I am sure there are way more out there.
Thanks,
77newyorker440


I have one ...

77 New Yorker.JPG
 

6PKRTSE

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No one will actually know an exact number but I would say not all that many these days. I have parted out 2 four doors, 3 two doors and a wagon myself over the years for their engines and transmissions. I have a 74' NY'r currently. No, this one will not get parted out. (Yet).

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chipieal

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Before we say it is unanswerable -- let's use the yardstick developed by Special Interest Autos in 1977. They claimed after 20 years approximately 10% are left. After 40 years roughly 5%. So 62,000 cars sold in 1977. (my dad had one) Incidentally, this is quite respectable when you consider the last Imperial with the same body style sold around 9,000. But I digress. Rounding the numbers, 6200 should have been around in 1997. 10% of that for the year 2017 would indicate 620. That sounds about right to me. And lately, all of them seem to be on Ebay etc. as low mileage originals lol
 

69CoronetRT

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Before we say it is unanswerable -- let's use the yardstick developed by Special Interest Autos in 1977. They claimed after 20 years approximately 10% are left. After 40 years roughly 5%. So 62,000 cars sold in 1977. (my dad had one) Incidentally, this is quite respectable when you consider the last Imperial with the same body style sold around 9,000. But I digress. Rounding the numbers, 6200 should have been around in 1997. 10% of that for the year 2017 would indicate 620. That sounds about right to me. And lately, all of them seem to be on Ebay etc. as low mileage originals lol

Bending and twisting numbers is folly. You're assuming the same rate of decay and loss over time when survivability factors change i.e. less miles driven per car.

Factor in Cash for Clunkers, general apathy toward saving cars as they are not nearly as easy to fix for shade tree mechanics as pre 1977 cars and other factors not in existence when the 1977 numbers were developed.

The answer still comes out as unanswerable as you cannot know in what condition any of the surviving cars exist nor where they are located.
 

Rusell Petry

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Okay, thanks for letting me know, I just thought I'd look into it, seemed like a pretty interesting query, maybe next summer I'll try to start a database for all the surviving 77 New Yorkers, at least to get an idea of how many are left and being cared for. Either way, it will be a tough project, but it could yield pretty cool results, it will just take me time with being busy with everything going on.

I have one with 59,000 original miles on it. I bought it from the original Chrysler employee family in Detroit that purchased it new. It has a few tiny mostly unnoticeable imperfections on it but sitting in a parking lot, it looks almost new. I am keeping it protected in my garage and am replacing all the brake components including brake lines. I live in Pleasant Hill Missouri. So you have one more for your future database.

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chipieal

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Special Intertest Autos (Hemmings Classic cars) devised a simple formula to calculate the number of given automobiles left extant from a given year. It was: at 50 years (which yours is just shy of) there will be approximately 10% left. Incidentally, I had both a 77 NYB (triple Burgundy with leather) and a 78 St Regis coupe in triple Dove Gray As a long distance cruiser, I have never found another vehicle that could beat it. Two cautionaries: one get rid of the Lean Burn. it never operated correctly when new 2) If it has climate control (Air Temp) watch the servo relays.
 

69CoronetRT

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Special Intertest Autos (Hemmings Classic cars) devised a simple formula to calculate the number of given automobiles left extant from a given year. It was: at 50 years (which yours is just shy of) there will be approximately 10% left.

I'm honestly and sincerely not trying to be a dick about this.

My post 34 stands. You can't estimate the number based on too many intervening factors.

Your most recent post contradicts what you posted earlier. How can you have 10% at 50 years when only 5% are left at 40 years?

"let's use the yardstick developed by Special Interest Autos in 1977. They claimed after 20 years approximately 10% are left. After 40 years roughly 5%."
 

PeugFra

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Special Intertest Autos (Hemmings Classic cars) devised a simple formula to calculate the number of given automobiles left extant from a given year.

I have serious doubts as well, but it would be interesting to know how that simple formula came about. Did they factor in a lot of variables or was it more gut feeling? Anyway, they can't have considered new factors popping up after 1977.
 
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