1966 Newport Radiator

5fty7vn

Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2014
Messages
51
Reaction score
14
Location
Buckeye, AZ
I'm debating on replacing the radiator for '66 Newport with a 383. It's old (pretty sure it's original) but honestly, it doesn't leak. I took it out the other day to run water through it and attempt to clean it out. At first it was a bit dirty, nothing terrible. It didn't take long for clear water to come out. I've replaced the thermostat, I have a new thermal fan clutch on order to solve the overheating issues i'm having with it. The fan shroud on the current radiator bolts to the side of the radiator, but every radiator i've seen online has bolts on the back side of it that, i'm assuming, is where the fan shroud would mount to. I've been told that taking the radiator in to have it cleaned out costs about the same as a brand new radiator anyway. Anyone have any suggestions as to whether I should even get a new one.....or just have this one cleaned out and pressure tested? I also have a new radiator cap on order as well, with the correct 16 PSI.
 

Davea Lux

Old Man with a Hat
FCBO Gold Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2017
Messages
9,078
Reaction score
8,328
Location
Cornelius Or
If it is not leaking, it probably can be cleaned out. That will be a good deal cheaper than a re-core. Some of the after market aluminum radiators are relatively inexpensive, but do your homework as these are sometimes fitment and quality control issues with them. I personally stay with factory brass radiators because I like to keep the cars as original as possible.

Dave
 

rapidtrans

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2016
Messages
4,066
Reaction score
5,395
Location
MI
I’d go with a clean-out or re-core if needed. That way it stays original looking and more important all your hose, trans fittings, shroud holes and radiator support mounts are correct. Seems like every new replacement comment I’ve read involves at least one modification required when installing it.
 

5fty7vn

Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2014
Messages
51
Reaction score
14
Location
Buckeye, AZ
If it is not leaking, it probably can be cleaned out. That will be a good deal cheaper than a re-core. Some of the after market aluminum radiators are relatively inexpensive, but do your homework as these are sometimes fitment and quality control issues with them. I personally stay with factory brass radiators because I like to keep the cars as original as possible.

Dave
Thank you for the advice........I haven't seen any radiator so far that would work as far as getting the shroud mounted correctly. I think i'll just take it in and have it cleaned out.
 

5fty7vn

Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2014
Messages
51
Reaction score
14
Location
Buckeye, AZ
I’d go with a clean-out or re-core if needed. That way it stays original looking and more important all your hose, trans fittings, shroud holes and radiator support mounts are correct. Seems like every new replacement comment I’ve read involves at least one modification required when installing it.

Thank you. I don't think it needs to be cored but a good cleaning will probably help a ton.
 

John Kirby

Active Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2016
Messages
282
Reaction score
150
Location
Minneapolis , Mn
I'm not an expert on cleaning a radiator, but why not pour a bottle of lime away or CLR in it and run it for a 100 miles or so. Drive it for a couple days and then flush the system. The main thing is to clean out all the lime/rust deposits. Most people grabbed the water hose when filling it up and never gave a single thought to the hardness of the water. If water from a water softener or distilled water was used it's entire life there wouldn't be deposits to clean out.
 

Richard Reau

Active Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2019
Messages
338
Reaction score
324
Location
Tampa
When I was re-commissioning my '67 Newport (383 2 BBL), I needed a radiator, as mine was leaking badly. I called my local NAPA store, and they said: "Yes, we can have one at the store at noon, it's $250." So I bought it and all is well. Here in Tampa, I don't run the car with a thermostat, the car is warm from the get-go. No overheating issues even in steamy Tampa.
 
Top