'67 Monaco master brake cylinder questions

MoPar~Man

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Transmission was down 2 quarts from full, did not engage when in gear. Car was driven into the storage unit when parked 23 years ago. I'm guessing this unit would get very hot inside in the summer heat (these are single-story, shingled roof). There are several stains on the floor, under the engine, under the rear trans, under the gas tank. It smelled like a refinery when I opened the unit back in March this year and again a few weeks ago when I started to get the car working. I had to scrape black tarry goo from the floor where the tank had been leaking.

No stain anywhere has enough "liquid" material to be able to be soaked up by anything (paper towel or granular).

Transmission may very well have been leaking from rear seal, and when level went down low enough the leak stopped and the trans seal area dried up (as shown in above photo).
 

Big_John

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If the car has sat for 23 years, I would have been surprised if there wasn't oil etc. under the car. The seals aren't really completely leak proof and things dry up when not used.

The wetness on the driveshaft could be anything as it all runs back off the engine and trans when driving.

Just check the fluids (all of them), change/top off as needed and then drive the car. Then see what leaks and doesn't leak.... And I don't mean up and down the driveway either... Some things magically seal back up with use and some get worse. The only exception to this is the brake system. No leaks tolerated there any time.
 

Loadrunner

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Sitting is death to seals. Shafts need to rotate, move the oil around.

Old CAT manuals advise starting the machine occasionally, and moving it back and forth to "limber it up".

Like a human body, use it or lose it.
 

Gerald Morris

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I ended up w 2 cases of 1968-69 Wagner dual master cylinders a while back. I should peddle a few but too much of a hoarder.

View attachment 559523View attachment 559524

Spiffy looking MCs! These appear to have an all drum setup too, by the lids. I'm happy w my Bendix clone, BUT, these look promising. If you think you can endure parting w part of your treasure sometime, let me know. Mind you, I UNDERSTAND the Joy of Hoarding!
 

Loadrunner

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Ahhh, the joy of hoarding, of "being owned" by your endless possessions...

I think I forgot I even had those for the last couple years, as they became buried by other acquisitions, and then mice moved into that - tough year for rodents - and I cleaned up, six trips to the dump later, I can see things again, like there's more things that need to go to the dump.

Application was 1969 Dodge D200 with drums all the way around, as a disc brake was something rather exotic back then, although the truck has a front sway bar, power front disc brakes wouldn't become standard equipment on American cars/trucks til the 70's, maybe the mid 70's on pickups.

I could see parting with a couple. I'll probably never need all 12 of these ;]

Brand new - not reman - Wagner, virgins.

Auto parts are like fine wine, only get better with age because of what's available now, or not available, and the prices.

Just like 40 years ago, C body parts weren't particularly desirable, but times sure have changed.

Nostalgia drives us. Just like the Harley or Gibson flametop market. We're trying to recapture something, probably youth.

When we're gone, us aging baby boomers, no one will even know how to start these cars/trucks, and they'll get melted down.


W300 a.jpg


Dodgesaurus Rex
 
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Gerald Morris

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Yea well I'm sure that $500 worth of flaring tools helps. I went out and bought some of that copper-nickel brake line. It is way more flexible than steel, but seems just as hard to cut with a hacksaw. It is easier to flare with my dime-store flaring tool, but not a lot easier. Satisfactory double flare.

Get a good tubing cutter, not some cheap 3rd world slave made crap. A GOOD square cut without much ridge helps when double flaring. I did up some 5/16" tubing for a new fuel line for the crappy Carter BBD I installed. Glad I kept the old lines for a Stromberg though...

I also scored an old Craftsman bubble flaring kit for a modest outlay. One can get decent quality tools by shopping for the old stuff! For the present, I'm satisfied my brake lines are delivering their fluid well, though I might eventually replace them. For now, my brakes are decent, and will only improve after purging the NAPA-crappa from the vehicle.
 

Gerald Morris

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Ahhh, the joy of hoarding, of "being owned" by your endless possessions...

....

When we're gone, us aging baby boomers, no one will even know how to start these cars/trucks, and they'll get melted down.

PLENTY Fedz, recent generations, Chicken Littles all would LOVE to melt our glorious reminders of an Age they will never enjoy before we perish, be sure of it. I'm blessed to live in this barrio though, where few get indoctrinated by Skool more than they minimally must. Ergo, they dig my old Mopars, and RESPECT the ability to keep them moving on an income even less than theirs by a factor of 2 or more. Only university types hate our rides, near as I can tell. Glad I hide my own degree around here.
 

JimmyG

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Hi. If you read the article listed elsewhere, regarding converting from single to dual reservoir master cylinders, you will find an entry done by me that outlines several of the fittings required for fitting size conversion. The original article is from another member. Do a search (upper right corner of the screen) for "Poor man's brake conversion" and the entire article and my additions should magically appear. I realize that you are not converting, but it does speak to master cylinder types and fitting assistance. Besides,...it isn't a bad read! Oh, by the way, the master cylinder from a 68 Plymouth Fury with drum brakes was perfect. Good luck.
 

John Kirby

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The car had been sitting for 20 years in storage, it might have lost most of the rear reservoir before I put it in storage. I filled the rear reserviour but the level doesn't drop when I open the front brake bleed screws. There is brake fluid weeping out of a hole on the lower mounting face of the master cylinder.

Some of these P/N application differences might be to account for (a) front disk brakes and (b) manual vs power brakes.

Was power brakes or disk brakes optional for '67 Polara / Monaco?

Odd. I see indications that the Raybestos MC36221 is compatible with Monaco years 67-70 but for Polara only 1970.
That's because the rear chamber is for the rear brakes, not the front.
 

John Kirby

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I bought one of these and it works well. Not for a pro, but great for a home shop.

Amazon product

Money well spent for me as I was having an issue with a bad wheel cylinder, but honestly, a vacuum pump can also do the job, just not as efficiently and be used for other things.

Amazon product

This is the tool to use. You can find it for a bit less if you shop around. But with recent inflation I am probably wrong. A very large C-clamp is the best way to mount the plate on top of the master cylinder. The chains are worthless.
 

John Kirby

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Yea well I'm sure that $500 worth of flaring tools helps. I went out and bought some of that copper-nickel brake line. It is way more flexible than steel, but seems just as hard to cut with a hacksaw. It is easier to flare with my dime-store flaring tool, but not a lot easier. Satisfactory double flare.
Get a tubing cutter from Home Depot or Lowes. Make cutting tubing quick and easy.
 

MoPar~Man

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That's because the rear chamber is for the rear brakes, not the front.

Well, unless my car was plumbed wrong as some point in the past, the rear chamber (which is larger than the forward chamber) is plumbed to the front brakes.

Maybe it was my imagination, but while bleeding the new MC (clear tubing from the ports circling back into their respective chamber) I was watching the flow through these tubes while the brake pedal was being pumped and it seemed to me that there was a delayed flow on the rear port (the port going to my front brakes). As if, by design, the front port was designed to pressurize (or flow) first, slightly ahead of the rear port.

And yes, I found my really small (or compact) tube cutter, which I've previously only used on 1/2" copper water pipe, and yes I would judge that it would have cut the 3/16 brake line I was working with.
 
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John Kirby

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Well, unless my car was plumbed wrong as some point in the past, the rear chamber (which is larger than the forward chamber) is plumbed to the front brakes.

And yes, I found my really small (or compact) tube cutter, which I've previously only used on 1/2" copper water pipe, and yes I would judge that it would have cut the 3/16 brake line I was working with.
My 66 Nyer is the opposite (with a '72 disc brake setup). I actually reversed the lines by mistake a couple years ago when doing a brake system rebuild. Could barely stop the car. Don't worry about the different size line ends, you can buy adapters at autozone.
 

TxDon

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Well, unless my car was plumbed wrong as some point in the past, the rear chamber (which is larger than the forward chamber) is plumbed to the front brakes.
Your car is correct, the rear MC reservoir is for the front brakes.
 

MoPar~Man

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Ok, here it is. First drive out of storage for 23 years (and after washing the dust off).

The Green Hornet (as my dad calls it).

67-monaco-1.jpg


67-monaco-2.jpg


67-monaco-3.jpg


Should I maybe post full-car photos on a different place on this board?
 
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