Broadcast Sheet Question

72DL41

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My '72 Polara was built at the Newark, DE plant and exported to Canada. The Broadcast Sheet has "01 or 91 CANADIAN SPEC" at the bottom. Can someone tell me what that "SPEC" is or what it consisted of? Thanks.
 
My '72 Polara was built at the Newark, DE plant and exported to Canada. The Broadcast Sheet has "01 or 91 CANADIAN SPEC" at the bottom. Can someone tell me what that "SPEC" is or what it consisted of? Thanks.
The 01 code is the build code for a vehicle destined for export, Canada being the country specified. In '72, the US had stricter emission standards and vehicles meant for export did not have to meet the same standard and were not EPA certified for US sales. Conversely some countries had different standards which had to be met to certify a vehicle for use in that country.

Dave
 
Thanks. That explains why I needed three forms filled out by Customs & Border Protection when I imported it. They only checked the box "Vehicle is 25 years or older" on the forms. I also needed the forms to register it with my local DMV.

The vehicle has the Evaporation Control System (charcoal canister), but I don't see any other emissions-related equipment.

Are there any other specs./codes on the Broadcast Sheet specific to a Canadian vehicle?
 
Thanks. That explains why I needed three forms filled out by Customs & Border Protection when I imported it. They only checked the box "Vehicle is 25 years or older" on the forms. I also needed the forms to register it with my local DMV.

The vehicle has the Evaporation Control System (charcoal canister), but I don't see any other emissions-related equipment.

Are there any other specs./codes on the Broadcast Sheet specific to a Canadian vehicle?
Canadian vehicles sold in the northern areas usually had block heaters and heavier batteries to compensate for the lower temps. Depending on the year. one might also find things like heated exterior mirrors and larger window washer tanks. You might also try www.mopar1.us/build.html. These are a fairly complete listing of most of the option codes. US and Canada used many the same codes even though some items may not be specified for both destinations.

Dave
 
My '72 Polara was built at the Newark, DE plant and exported to Canada. The Broadcast Sheet has "01 or 91 CANADIAN SPEC" at the bottom. Can someone tell me what that "SPEC" is or what it consisted of? Thanks.

There were numerous two digit numbers and associated notations used at the bottom of broadcast sheets.

For MY 1972, 01 = SPECIAL HANDLING, 08 = EXPORT, 10 = SPECIAL TRIM, 17 = SPECIAL ORDER, etc. These same codes were used at the various plants. I'm sure there are many more codes, one is likely CANADIAN SPEC, of which I do not have examples.

So....unless the notation says SPECIAL HANDLING, it is not code 01.

Screenshot 2024-03-13 at 8.40.29 PM.png


The only indication for final country destination on a '72 BS will be the U-C-I (US-Canada-International) designation on the top line plus any modified VON.
 
The only indication for final country destination on a '72 BS will be the U-C-I (US-Canada-International) designation on the top line plus any modified VON.
My B.S. is "H Series 1972" and Line 1 has the letter "C" in the U-C-I box that's part of the "Y Vehicle Del. and Handling Y" section. The letter "C" at the top and "CANADIAN SPEC." at the bottom would be two indications of final country destination.

Would the letter "C" on the third line of the tag be related to the "C" on the B.S.?

I'm familiar with the term VON, but not "modified VON".

IMG_3923.jpg
 
My B.S. is "H Series 1972" and Line 1 has the letter "C" in the U-C-I box that's part of the "Y Vehicle Del. and Handling Y" section. The letter "C" at the top and "CANADIAN SPEC." at the bottom would be two indications of final country destination.

Would the letter "C" on the third line of the tag be related to the "C" on the B.S.?

I'm familiar with the term VON, but not "modified VON".

View attachment 649691


Would the letter "C" on the third line of the tag be related to the "C" on the B.S.? Yes.

I'm familiar with the term VON, but not "modified VON". A typical '72 VON will start with a six digit number generated by the number on a standard order sheet. I'm using the term modified VON to indicate the car's destination (Canada or International) or purpose (Dealer Demo, Show car, Lease, etc) will be reflected by modifying the original VON and substituting the first number with a letter then five digits.

That's just me. Others may use different words, terms or explanations to get across the same concept.
 
Thanks. That explains why I needed three forms filled out by Customs & Border Protection when I imported it. They only checked the box "Vehicle is 25 years or older" on the forms. I also needed the forms to register it with my local DMV.

The vehicle has the Evaporation Control System (charcoal canister), but I don't see any other emissions-related equipment.

Are there any other specs./codes on the Broadcast Sheet specific to a Canadian vehicle?
The carb will be different. The EGR plumbing will be different. The distributor curves may be different.
 
Canadian vehicles sold in the northern areas usually had block heaters and heavier batteries to compensate for the lower temps. Depending on the year. one might also find things like heated exterior mirrors and larger window washer tanks. You might also try www.mopar1.us/build.html. These are a fairly complete listing of most of the option codes. US and Canada used many the same codes even though some items may not be specified for both destinations.

Dave
None of that stuff was "standard" on a car built for Canada. Block heaters and Group 27 batteries were optional. No Chrysler product in these years had heated outside rearview mirrors and there was only one size of windshield washer bottle. One correction: Cars sold in Quebec "may" have all had rear window defrosters (legal requirement), but the price of the car reflected that and just because Quebec passed a law didn't mean it became standard. I'm sure dealers in the prairies ordered all of their cars with block heaters, but they were an extra cost option, they were never standard.

I remember walking into a Pontiac dealer in 1965 in Windsor who had a giant sandwich board in the corner of the showroom. It listed the starting price of all of the Ponchos they sold, and underneath it was the cost of all of the "MANDATORY OPTIONS". These included turn signals, a heater/defroster and something else I can't recall at the moment.
 
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