Has the RV2 compressor an oil pump?

Heating, Cooling & AC

  1. Hurst Pete

    Hurst Pete Member

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    Yes detmatt, I was first wondering about my almost broken VISA card and then about the big container in my yard.
    Does anybody need some emblems? Cheep.... :rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2019
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  2. Hurst Pete

    Hurst Pete Member

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    My A/C RV2 is still a mistery for me.
    Just found an emblem on top of it that says it needs R 134. That means a A R406 liquid I already bought is no good choice?

    AC emblem.jpg
     
  3. Hurst Pete

    Hurst Pete Member

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    I actually have a RV2, see this emblem on top of it. Yes, what Laysons wrote is strange, I realise now.

    AC emblem.jpg
     
  4. Hurst Pete

    Hurst Pete Member

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    Thanks for the instructions!
    To be shure with the measurements to build a dipstick, can you please tell me one more time the correct dimensions from 1-3?

    Second picture shows the original RV2. There was no oil inside...

    inches.jpg

    AC Sump.jpg
     
  5. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Professional Tinkerer FCBO Gold Member

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    I’m out of town for the day, will send you those dimensions by Monday. I see you have the spring. Is the tiny ball in there, too?
     
  6. Hurst Pete

    Hurst Pete Member

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    Yes Trace, the tiny ball was on top of the spring.
    below a picture with the dipstick I build with your help. Thanks.
    The stem is a cable tie I glued in with epoxy resin.
    The overall legth of the inserted dipstick is 4 3/16" as described in the 1970 Chrysler Manual, right?
    The oil level is where the the gasket is, right?

    dipstick1.jpg

    dipstick2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2019
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  7. Hurst Pete

    Hurst Pete Member

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    The seals I used in my AC system are from ebay USA.
    I think they are new ones, no old brittle NOS parts.

    Green seals1.jpg
     
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  8. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    This compressor was upgraded to accept R-134a, that means it has the high density gaskets and O-Rings. That does not mean it will not work with R-12 or R-406. The valve bodies, pistons and bearings remain the same. Some rebuilt compressors are shipped with 3-4 oz of oil and that should be discarded if you are going to use R-406 and replaced with mineral type refrigerant oil. Making the dipstick is a nice thing to have, but I usually find it simpler to just pre-measure the oil so I know how much I put in the system. The dipstick method does not account for oil that is circulating in the system once it has been run. The warning decal is placed on the rebuilt unit so that mineral type oil is not installed with R-134a refrigerant. The mineral oil is not compatible with R-134a and turns into a snot like jell that has no lubricating properties when exposed to R-134a.

    Dave
     
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  9. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Professional Tinkerer FCBO Gold Member

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    Dave,

    I measured the oil when filling my empty system, but after my seal leak and a leak at the sensor well , I made the dipstick to
    Yes, the total length is 4 3/16....mine is 1/16th shorter....for no reason other than that end of the stick doesn't matter for our measurements. It could be 1/2 inch shorter and not matter for the measurement of the oil level.

    As for the oil level being at the gasket, I have no idea and I doubt that that's significant. If your sump is still apart, pour 10 oz of water in it and educate us all. :D All we're concerned about is the range marks that I showed on my pic above, as that's the acceptable range just like on your engine's dipstick.

    As for the dimensions you requested, 1) is 1 5/8ths, 2) is 1 3/4s, and 3) is 3/4ths, giving a total length of my stick of 4 1/8ths....1/16 shorter than the FSM. On my pic, the lower mark indicates 6 oz of oil, the upper mark shows 8 oz.

    The oil is so very clear it's hard to read on the dipstick. Maybe the tiny notches in your zip tie might be helpful to see where that oil lever is, like we often see on an engine dipstick.

    As Dave said, your best bet is to load the compressor with 10 oz of oil, and a half oz of dye. If there are no leaks once you're charged with 406, you never have to think about that oil again. I made the dipstick because I had some leaks and needed to double check that the sump had 6-8 oz of oil in it when I had the system discharged.

    And finally, you DON'T want to pull that filler plug out with the system charged. But you knew that.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2019
  10. saforwardlook

    saforwardlook Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    Lots of good information in this thread that I had apparently missed in the past. Thanks to all who contributed. I found out about most of this stuff on my own, the hard way, fairly recently, except the compessor on my car was still in very good condition and I only needed to replace the front seal and went through the same findings with the NOS seals that were expressed here, so I went with the new replacement ones. So I avoided all the compressor issues.

    One question I do have remaining is what did you use and how did you flush the a/c system in your vehicles, and did you flush the parts with them all apart separate from the system or as a system?

    Also, when talking with Original Auto Air in Florida, I decided I would stick with R12 refrigerant to avoid some problems with R134 and the need for a new expansion valve and a higher efficiency condenser in order to achieve good cooling performance with R134. They also recommended using a temperature switch mounted on the expansion valve when using 134 rather than using the EPR valve in the back of the compressor to prevent evaporator freeze up. The use of the on/off switch is like on the A body Valiant and Dart systems, and thereby allows the use of lower gas charge temperatures in the evaporator than the EPR valves, which shut off refrigerant flow at a higher temperature since they are further away from the real temperature in the evaporator, thus requiring the EPR valve to have a higher shut off temperature to avoid freeze up since being further away from the evaporator, a larger temperture safety margin is needed.

    I did end up replacing most everything in the system except the compressor itself (the car came from back east and it seems the compressor was not used very much and was very clean inside since the system had never been opened apparently until I had to do so, and it was driven by an older lady who probably didn't use it much - and the car didn't have high miles either). I didn't replace the evaporater or the hoses since Original Auto Air said the hoses usually don't leak with R12 because over time the R12 refrigerant and mineral oil tend to build up a barrier inside the hoses that further prevents leakage of freon - and the hoses appeared to be in good condition. They also said the evaporators do not usually need replacing but they did recommend use of a new condensor since they said it is hard to get all of the oil out of them and the fittings on them are hard to remove after so many years due to corrosion build-up without ruining the condensers at the fitting area and newer condensers would usually have a higher efficiency than the old ones because they are designed for both R134 and R12.

    Fortunately, though, new a/c condensers and evaporators are now available from this company I mentioned in another thread as well as new heater cores and other parts:

    Exact Replacement A/C Components Now Becoming Available for Our C bodies
     
  11. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Professional Tinkerer FCBO Gold Member

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    Yeah, there is no reason to use NOS seals, and good reasons to avoid them. High cost and corroded vs. $8 and perfect and quickly available locally most anywhere that has an AutoZone.

    Here's what I used to flush and flush some more. I had all components out of the car, but the evap could certainly be left in place. I would NOT do the whole system at once (by using both compressor connections as "in" and "out") Remove hoses and condenser, etc. Otherwise you'll have a mess on your hands. And your fenders. And everywhere else. And in your eyes, which is really something to avoid.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06X9QSHM9/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    with two cans of this https://www.amazon.com/TSI-Supercool-FFG-Gallon-Greater/dp/B008PKVSF8/ref=sr_1_8?crid=384PPCDXLU6MX&keywords=ac+flush+kit&qid=1575840703&s=automotive&sprefix=ac+flush,automotive,166&sr=1-8

    along with several cans of the pressurized AC flush sold at every parts store. IMO, you can't flush the system enough when it's all apart and getting rebuilt. The system had some red dye in it from a long time ago, so I flushed until it ran clear, and then some.

    After draining the condenser by "clocking" it for a few days to let most of the oil find its way out, I then poured a cup or two of flush in and sealed the ends, and then kinda revolved and shook the condenser to get the oil dissolved in the flush. Then I did the power flush, with great results. Crud and oil gone.

    Compressed air to blow everything out, plus a few days to insure the flush is evaporated away.
     
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  12. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Professional Tinkerer FCBO Gold Member

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    And yeah, it's great to use R12 and get that 40* air out of the center vent. But yaknow, even with these low temps, our cars are not the best insulated and sealed vehicles on the road. All that glass and sheetmetal, and that big engine on the other side of the sparsely insulated firewall, and you need all the low temps you can get on a summer day in the sun.
     
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  13. Hurst Pete

    Hurst Pete Member

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    The pan has a content of 6 oz. of water, see picture.

    Level 1.jpg

    Sump capacity.jpg
     
  14. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Professional Tinkerer FCBO Gold Member

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    Interesting, thanks. Now we know.

    The inside of that pan looks filthy. Is that dirt or just stains?
     
  15. Hurst Pete

    Hurst Pete Member

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    The preowner told me that the A/C wasn`t working for 30 years. Maybe in Baltimore/Maryland is the weather not very hot.
     
  16. Trace 300 Hurst

    Trace 300 Hurst Professional Tinkerer FCBO Gold Member

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    Having lived in Washington DC for 46 years of my life, I can assure you that summers there are brutally hot and humid from late May until mid-September. And *most* of America is like that during the summer. But I never thought about that as a teen/young man as I wheeled my 68 Dart through the city, and then my 71 Cuda. A/C was for older, rich people. But then I bought an 85 Daytona Turbo, with power windows and A/C for $16K new, and life changed forever. Life without A/C is unimaginable.

    But now that you mention it, I thought the other day about why a fellow in Switzerland needs A/C? Yes?