Heavy Metal

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  1. amazinblue82

    amazinblue82 Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    Was watching the movie "Fury" the other day. Good flick I thought.

    Anyway, a scene in that movie was a fight with a "Tiger" tank (similar to a 'fight scene" in Kelly's Heroes -- another good tank flick from the 1970's) made me think of military tanks and other "heavy metal".

    First, I know NOTHING about tanks..but something weighing 60+ tons, that can do 45mph with turret spinning 360 degrees, stop on a dime, and destroy a small town all by itself, has to be an impressive machine. The M1 Abrams.

    Those with an interest or first hand knowledge, what do you think of this thing?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5XUQ2beGfM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4d9KsTMA4E
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2015
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  2. amazinblue82

    amazinblue82 Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    The Bagger 288...never heard of it.

    She ain't fast, can't shoot a spitwad, but at 14,000 tons it might qualify as "heavy metal". Anybody know anything about this machine?

    [​IMG]
     
  3. amazinblue82

    amazinblue82 Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    Last one to prime the "thread" pump :)

    You Florida members (and most any space "propeller-head" like me) know what this is yes? 6 millions lbs, and zips along at 2 mph. seriously fascinating piece of equipment.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. detmatt

    detmatt Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    My Godfather, may he rest in piece, was an engineer with Chrysler defense when this tank was being developed. I witnessed the prototype, which was called the XM1 do some pretty amazing things during an open house at the tank plant(those were different times). I think 45 mph is on the conservative side, my understanding was closer to 55 over any terrain while not losing perfect aim on its target.
    This is an armor piercing round that I took home as a souvenir from the day. I used to know a lot more about it.
    :sFl_america2:

    image.jpg
     
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  5. commando1

    commando1 Sergeant at Arms FCBO Gold Member

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    Boom-Boom Bob will be checking in shortly... :D
     
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  6. amazinblue82

    amazinblue82 Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    55 mph and STILL hit stuff? hot damn! what a wonderful machine (i'm NOT promoting "war"...just its an astounding technical design. the stuff smart people come up with...:))!

    Motor Trend even test drove one in April 1982:

    http://www.motortrend.com/classic/roadtests/8204_first_test_m1_abrams/viewall.html

    The M1 power pack: 1500 hp and no pistons
    A monstrous machine needs an engine of monstrous capability, so as the diesel powerplant reached its potential, the turbine engine and its inherent advantages could not be overlooked. Though the M1 is built by Chrysler, a company with considerable turbine experience, its gas turbine engine was developed by the Lycoming Division of Avco, located in Stratford, Connecticut.

    m1-abrams-tank-power-pack.jpg

    "The 1500 turbine has two idle speeds. "Normal" idle, 750 rpm, is used whenever the tank is not on maneuvers. In the field the turbine operates at "tactical" idle, which is 1300 rpm and closer to the turbine's peak speed. The momentary throttle lag we complained about on The Range was due to a normal idle setting. At peak speed in low gear, when torque multiplication reaches 20:1, the turbine delivers an incredible 210,000 lb-ft. of torque to the drive sprocket! Power is transmitted directly, through a series of reduction gears, to log-sized halfshafts that connect to the sprockets.

    The gas turbine weighs 2500 lb. but its bulk is compact, measuring 66 x 39 x 33 in. These dimensions make it a perfect mate for the smaller and more streamlined profile of the M1. If you were a mechanic, you'd never use "engine" or "turbine" to describe the powerplant. In that endless military jargon, the turbine is known as the power pack. And the keepers of the M1 tank love it."


    m1-abrams-tank-power-pack.jpg
     
  7. Rwc

    Rwc Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    this is the 293. it replaced the 288 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cocg1u0nwbI

     
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  8. amazinblue82

    amazinblue82 Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    holy smoke...look at that thing! 31 Million pounds. Heavy Metal!
     
  9. Rwc

    Rwc Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

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    awesome and devastating all at once
     
  10. amazinblue82

    amazinblue82 Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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  11. amazinblue82

    amazinblue82 Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    The Nimitz-class carriers have an overall length of 1,092 ft (333 m) and a full-load displacement of about 100,000–104,000 long tons (102,000–106,000 t). They have a beam at the waterline of 135 ft (41 m), and the maximum width of their flight decks is 251 feet 10 inches (76.76 m) to 257 feet 3 inches (78.41 m) (depending on the variant). The ships' companies can number up to 3,200, not including an air wing of 2,480.

    All ships of the class are powered by two A4W nuclear reactors kept in separate compartments. They power four propeller shafts and can produce a maximum speed of over 30 knots (56 km/h) and maximum power of 260,000 bhp (190 MW). This is then passed through four turbines which are shared by the two reactors.

    The turbines power the four br
    onze screws, each with a diameter of 25 feet (7.6 m) and a weight of 66,000 pounds (30 t). The ships are capable of operating continuously for over 20 years without refueling and are predicted to have a service life of over 50 years.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. commando1

    commando1 Sergeant at Arms FCBO Gold Member

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    I have always loved the below pic because it shows you in scale the scary short take-off and landings the fighter pilots have to endure. That's a B-52, btw.

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. amazinblue82

    amazinblue82 Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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  14. 70bigblockdodge

    70bigblockdodge Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    Now your talking, we will bring the fight where you like.
     
  15. rkrochen

    rkrochen Member

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  16. amazinblue82

    amazinblue82 Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    this is why ANY country would like one...you can park enough destructive force right off the coast of your enemy to wipe his country from the face of the Earth. And he (your enemy) knows it.

    recall story of Millard Fillmore sending Commodore Perry on the little "errands" to Edo (Tokyo) before the Civil War to end Japan's 200 year isolation. The "Black Ships" as the Shoguns called them...had the "desired effect" -- without firing a shot. All rigged out, belching black smoke, and bristling with armament. what a sight. And that was 1854.

    that aside, AND stayin' away from the politics of current day global policy deployment cuz we know what happens when we "go there", a remarkable feat of technology and engineering in an aircraft carrier and all the stuff on it.

    one MORE thing..long article, but interesting. The "Captain" never sleeps..but what "cool' job..first he gets "jets", and if he's the best of the best of the best, he MAY get one of ONLY 11 jobs like it in the world.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2...he-commanding-officer-of-an-aircraft-carrier/

    Carriers never sleep, and therefore carrier captains seldom do either. Important activities go on throughout the day and night. Moving, assembling and testing ordnance, purifying and storing fuel, organizing the flight deck, mission planning, safely navigating the ship, preparing food, training and performing maintenance on important ship and aircraft systems go on around the clock.

    Flight operations normally consume 12 hours per day, and with these additional responsibilities the captain’s day is routinely 18 to 20 hours long; however, numerous special evolutions typically consume even more of the captain’s time. He is on the bridge for any special evolution that presents increased risk to the ship. Because of the “around the clock” nature of carrier operations, captains become masters at catching sleep whenever they can find a few minutes to do so.

    Commanding a carrier is one of the most demanding jobs in the Navy. On any given day, only 11 officers have these responsibilities in the U.S. Navy, and in the 100-year history of carrier operations, only a few of many thousands of naval aviators have served as carrier commanders. While it is a physically demanding job, requiring broad aviation experience, several unique qualifying duty assignments and very specialized training, it remains one of the most challenging and rewarding jobs in the Navy.
     
  17. 70bigblockdodge

    70bigblockdodge Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    No ship "sleeps" when it is underway there is always something going on. The only time we ever just put the hammer down and made turns for somewhere in a straight line was bad weather or after we finished with all the exercises that are planned on a return trip for a port. There were engineering drills, battle station training, sonar, gun play the big boom, boom one on the front, helo ops, they are not a cruise ship.
     
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  18. amazinblue82

    amazinblue82 Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    sounds like you've "been there and done that." :laughing4:

    a carrier?
     
  19. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    I guess that means nobody would be bringing me my drink with the umbrella in it.....
     
  20. 70bigblockdodge

    70bigblockdodge Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    Nope.:rofl:

    Been there, 4 years on the USS Hepburn FF1055, not a carrier but we did chase them around doing plane guard quite a bit.
     
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