New C-Body Spindles for Disc Brakes.

Brakes, Suspension, Rims and Tires

  1. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    IMHO, the Scarebird stuff is absolute crap. "Scare" is a good name.

    I looked at some of their stuff for another car and was not impressed. Basically flame cut steel with nuts welded on. No sense of good engineering or common sense on some of the applications.
     
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  2. CBODY67

    CBODY67 Senior Member

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    IF the factory OEM knuckles are of similar metal as the rear axle housing on "floating" rear axles on a 1-ton and heavier truck, there are some possibilities, but possibly expensive ones.

    Back in the later '70s, we had several Chevy C-60 customers who had failures on the rear axle bearings on the rear axle. The threads for the adjusters were wasted, but we took the bare housing to an old-line machine shop. They re-welded the ends of the axles and then re-machined them, new threads cut and all. When done, it looked like nothing had been done, but I knew different. Finding a shop that does this for the HD truck vehicles might be the trick, though. Of course, using knuckles that were x-rayed/magnafluxed/Zyglowed to check for internal/external defects would be necessary, FIRST.

    On some of the woodworking shows on PBS, they will take a wood plug and glue it into an existing hole, then when it's all cured, re-drill the holes with a different ctr-to-ctr dimension. Might something of this nature be done with the existing knuckles for the ball joint mounts?

    I, too, prefer OEM-engineered items. In this case, though, perhaps a Wilwood system might be a better choice than something "unknown"? Or perhaps a hybrid OEM/Wilwood system? Using Wilwood for the wheel-brake items and OEM for the booster/master cylinder and needed valving?

    To me, that video raises more questions than it answers.

    CBODY67
     
  3. 330dTA

    330dTA Well-Known Member

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    Would someone happen to know which brand the ”generic knuckle” is, that Ram Man shows in the video? More precise info?
    I mean, if I bump into a parts store and ask for ” a generic knuckle” I might not get what I was looking for.
     
  4. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    These are parts he is selling. His "brand". I don't see them listed, so a call or email is probably needed.
    Home
     
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  5. 330dTA

    330dTA Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Big_John. That much I knew, though. Just figured someone might have some insight as to where Ram Man sourced those spindles. - I’m sure they are inexpensive, just as he states in the vid you posted. I’m also pretty sure they won’t be as inexpansive when he puts them on his web store. His disc brake set up goes for 12 hundred USD.
     
  6. ascari

    ascari New Member

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    OK, let's for a moment be real about metallurgy and manufacturing: First off, metallurgy as a science and engineering discipline has advanced immensely since the -60s and -70s in all countries including our own. It's also a sad fact that since WWII the US steel industry has slowly but surely fallen behind countries like Germany and Japan in terms of quality and innovation. In specialty steels other producers like Spain and Sweden have been far ahead of us for many decades. The Japanese have been the world leaders in quality control since the -70s and we've been gradually adopting their methods. Engineering methods have advanced in leaps and bounds since the bigger-is-better school of engineering that was prevalent in Detroit when our cars were built, not the least thanks to things like finite element analysis. Also, in my work I've seen huge variability in the failure rates of automotive components made by the same company in different factories the challenge being to pinpoint the cause of the difference and fix it. My take away from all this is that as long as the forgings are well engineered, based on good quality steel of uniform specification and properly executed in the mill it doesn't really matter if they're made in the US or not or where the steel comes from.

    Therefore as much as we all hate to admit it the good sh*t can be made anywhere as long as it's done right using the right materials. Also, the good sh*t usually isn't inexpensive, but sometimes it can be thanks to the advances I mentioned.

    Before you kick me to death: I'm not at all saying that original is bad or anything like that, but I humbly suggest let's be open to the possibility that something new actually could be better than something old and even that in some cases something inexpensive could be better than something expensive. Those are my two cents. Now go ahead and kick me to death. I probably deserve it.
     
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  7. CBODY67

    CBODY67 Senior Member

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    I will concur that the design of metallic items used to be "If it looks strong and substantial, it is". But as engineering analysis became much more refined, much of "the meat" could be eliminated and could result in something even stronger as a result. Add a few reinforcement bars or gussets and it's both lighter and stronger, with the same mix of metal.

    Well-executed good designs, with great quality control of all processes, should work no matter where they are done. At least in theory. The OEM's problems include how to get the desired strength/cycle life from a cast part at the least cost. End result is that the projected failure rate will impact the cost of the item being made, one way or another. A big judgment call by those pricing out the vehicles for how much $$$$ it takes to get the vehicle to the end of the assembly line.

    CBODY67
     
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