orange box and small conversion harness QUESTION

Mike McGuire

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Hello Mopar friends,

I'm in the middle of an electronic ignition switch over for a 68 newport.

I have the orange box, new electronic distributor, firewall replacement unit (voltage regulator?) small wiring harness with:
* orange box plug
* connector for new distributor
3 wires
1 wire goes to coil -
2 other wires, blue and green go to ballast resistor area.
Here's the question...
Do I need to change to a 4 post ballast resistor, or can I jump across the existing 2 post ballast resistor? Or, can I jump those 2 wires across a spare 1.6 ohm 2 post ballast resistor, if so, do I tie one end common with the existing 2 post ballast resistor?

Thanks in advance,
Mike
 
Does the orange box have 4 pins or 5 pins?

4 pin uses a single ballast and the green wire gets clipped.

mopar-electronic-ignition-wiring-diagram-gooddy-2.jpg



5 pin uses a dual ballast resistor.

862984-May25_20.jpg
 
Also when doing the electronic ignition conversion, be sure to also purchase an electronic voltage regulator. This is very important because point type regulators like the factory one in your car create static and that will fry you new orange box. The regulator is not included with the conversion kit.

Dave
 
Also when doing the electronic ignition conversion, be sure to also purchase an electronic voltage regulator. This is very important because point type regulators like the factory one in your car create static and that will fry you new orange box. The regulator is not included with the conversion kit.

Dave
Yes, I got that. Thanks!
Hello Mopar friends,

I'm in the middle of an electronic ignition switch over for a 68 newport.

I have the orange box, new electronic distributor, firewall replacement unit (voltage regulator?) small wiring harness with:
* orange box plug
* connector for new distributor
3 wires
1 wire goes to coil -
2 other wires, blue and green go to ballast resistor area.
Here's the question...
Do I need to change to a 4 post ballast resistor, or can I jump across the existing 2 post ballast resistor? Or, can I jump those 2 wires across a spare 1.6 ohm 2 post ballast resistor, if so, do I tie one end common with the existing 2 post ballast resistor?

Thanks in advance,
Mike



Thanks for the very useful help folks.

Much appreciated.

Mike
 
Everybody make this so complicated.
0. Disconnect the battery
1. LEAVE ballast and existing wiring alone!
2. Throw the ballast in the kit away!
3. Mount Module where the distributor and coil wires will reach.
4. Install the distributor.
5. Plug harness into the module
6. Plug distributor into the harness.
7. Run the coil wire
8. Run the blue wire to your EXISTING ballast (the input (12v) side)


Alan
 
Everybody make this so complicated.
0. Disconnect the battery
1. LEAVE ballast and existing wiring alone!
2. Throw the ballast in the kit away!
3. Mount Module where the distributor and coil wires will reach.
4. Install the distributor.
5. Plug harness into the module
6. Plug distributor into the harness.
7. Run the coil wire
8. Run the blue wire to your EXISTING ballast (the input (12v) side)


Alan
Thanks Alan, that's exactly what I did. Didn't throw the new ballast away yet, though. Mike
 
I recommend that you purchase a new heavy duty 2-prong ballast resistor to ensure that you ballast resistor lives a long life. I also recommend mounting the oranage box on a bracket or with some spacers so that air can flow around the back of the module and keep it cool.
 
Everybody make this so complicated.
0. Disconnect the battery
1. LEAVE ballast and existing wiring alone!
2. Throw the ballast in the kit away!
3. Mount Module where the distributor and coil wires will reach.
4. Install the distributor.
5. Plug harness into the module
6. Plug distributor into the harness.
7. Run the coil wire
8. Run the blue wire to your EXISTING ballast (the input (12v) side)


Alan
I've never heard that advice about the ballast before. Why keep the old ballast resistor in place and "Throw the ballast in the kit away!"?
 
I've never heard that advice about the ballast before. Why keep the old ballast resistor in place and "Throw the ballast in the kit away!"?
You can replace the Ballast with the new one.

One of the biggest confusions with this kit is what to do with the ballast, most people seam to think you need it in addition to the standard one, I have seen people do this. Even with the supplied wiring diagrams and all the other diagrams people have made this simple concept isn't noted. For some of us it is obvious, but in general for most it isn't.

I'm an OEM stock guy, I like my cars looking OEM correct. The ballast on my cars is the correct factory looking one, I do keep a parts store one in my tool bag.

I outlined it that way because it is the simplest. I don't even want to muddy the thread with an explanation on the purpose of the single vs dual ballasts.


Alan
 
Last edited:
You can replace the Ballast with the new one.

On of the biggest confusions with this kit is what to do with the ballast, most people seam to think you need it in addition to the standard one, I have seen people do this. Even with the supplied wiring diagrams and all the other diagrams people have made this simple concept isn't noted. For some of us it is obvious, but in general for most it isn't.

I'm an OEM stock guy, I like my cars looking OEM correct. The ballast on my cars is the correct factory looking one, I do keep a parts store one in my tool bag.

I outlined it that way because it is the simplest. I don't even want to muddy the thread with an explanation on the purpose of the single vs dual ballasts.


Alan
Ah gotcha. When you said "throw it away" I thought you were implying there's something defective about that replacement ballast and you shouldn't use it at all. I would've said throw it in your glovebox as a spare. Always carry a spare ballast. :)

It's been a long time since I looked into this so I could be mistaken, but I thought that the replacement ballast that came in the kit was a lower resistance than the OEM one. The electronic ignition may allow you to run higher coil current because it has more consistent dwell and no chance of burning points.
 
There isn't any difference in the ballast resistor. The dual ballast comes into play if you are dealing with the older 5 pin ECU. That hasn't been available for a while now, but since the OP seems to be using a 5 pin wiring harness and some loose (I assume used) parts and not a new kit, that is why the question of what do you have and the two wiring diagrams. You can use a 4 pin ECU with a 5 pin harness and dual resistor. The starting side of the dual resistor is not used. However, you can't use a 5 pin with a single ballast resistor.

I thought that was pretty freaking simple, but I guess that's just my opinion.
 
Even the kit has a 5-pin harness (with 5 wires), the OP didn't say weather the harness was purchased separately, part of a kit or salvaged.

The reality the ballast has nothing to do with the installation of the ignition module (assuming putting in a 4-pin module).
It is just a convenient location to get key-on power, there are other places under the hood you can do that (blue wires).


Alan
 
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