Slow-ish wipers

darth_linux

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2022
Messages
686
Reaction score
643
Location
Spokane, WA
1966 Newport with variable speed wipers:

I know it's foolish to expect modern day performance from 57 year wiper technology, but is there something I can do to speed up my slow wipers? I'm thinking something along the lines of taking the linkages apart and lubing them, new bushings or whatever, *maybe* a new motor . . .

Now, I normally don't drive in inclement weather, so it's mostly a moot point, but I do live in Washington State, and having all four seasons in one day IS a thing that can happen here. Getting caught in a summer thunderstorm that comes from nowhere does happen, and my wipers, as slow as they run at the moment, would be hazardous since they can't keep up with a good downpour.

Thanks for sharing your success stories!
 
1966 Newport with variable speed wipers:

I know it's foolish to expect modern day performance from 57 year wiper technology, but is there something I can do to speed up my slow wipers? I'm thinking something along the lines of taking the linkages apart and lubing them, new bushings or whatever, *maybe* a new motor . . .

Now, I normally don't drive in inclement weather, so it's mostly a moot point, but I do live in Washington State, and having all four seasons in one day IS a thing that can happen here. Getting caught in a summer thunderstorm that comes from nowhere does happen, and my wipers, as slow as they run at the moment, would be hazardous since they can't keep up with a good downpour.

Thanks for sharing your success stories!
The variable speed wipers use a rheostat switch on the dash. Think about it like the rheostat that controls your dash lights.

If it gets dirty it will slow the wiper motor down.

That said, coat your windshield with something like Rain-X. I've been doing that for years... actually the windshield and windows have been clay barred and get waxed. You can drive fast in a rain storm with the wipers off if you coat the windows. The water just beads and runs off.
 
The variable speed wipers use a rheostat switch on the dash. Think about it like the rheostat that controls your dash lights.

If it gets dirty it will slow the wiper motor down.

That said, coat your windshield with something like Rain-X. I've been doing that for years... actually the windshield and windows have been clay barred and get waxed. You can drive fast in a rain storm with the wipers off if you coat the windows. The water just beads and runs off.
Can you remove and clean the rheostat with electronics cleaner?
 
In the middle 1970s, I used to use Classic Wax on the windshield as well as the car body. Shined nice. The water beaded up well, too. Seemed to be a bit blurry with time and wiper use, though. Ended u discontinuing that practice. Just like the quarter panels, LOTS of surface to cover.
 
Rain X makes the wipers un necessary, almost. Try it.

Great on mountain passes with semi trucks and sand/dirt on the road. Can ruin a pair of blades in one trip.
 
Rain X makes the wipers un necessary, almost. Try it.

Great on mountain passes with semi trucks and sand/dirt on the road. Can ruin a pair of blades in one trip.
And it reduces sanding the windshield with the wipers.
 
1966 Newport with variable speed wipers:

I know it's foolish to expect modern day performance from 57 year wiper technology, but is there something I can do to speed up my slow wipers? I'm thinking something along the lines of taking the linkages apart and lubing them, new bushings or whatever, *maybe* a new motor . . .

Now, I normally don't drive in inclement weather, so it's mostly a moot point, but I do live in Washington State, and having all four seasons in one day IS a thing that can happen here. Getting caught in a summer thunderstorm that comes from nowhere does happen, and my wipers, as slow as they run at the moment, would be hazardous since they can't keep up with a good downpour.

Thanks for sharing your success stories!
 
All the remedies you mentioned are reasonable. Don't forget to check ground connections and voltage at the wiper motor. Voltage drop across the wiper switch is also suspect.
 
Back
Top