How would you clean this aluminum trim?

Exterior, Paint & Bodywork

  1. MarPar

    MarPar Meat Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

    Messages:
    6,296
    Likes Received:
    6839
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2015
    Location:
    Still in Dry Dock
    I have heard Easy-off oven cleaner. The good one.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  2. xxcarguy

    xxcarguy Active Member

    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    212
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2019
    Location:
    Broken Arrow Oklahoma
    Oh super
    All I can do is try.
    Someone said muriatic acid but I don’t know if they were answering me!
    Thanks
     
  3. Fast Eddie B

    Fast Eddie B Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

    Messages:
    530
    Likes Received:
    418
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2016
    Location:
    Western New York
    Oven cleaner. Works like a charm. It has to soak and it needs a lot of ventilation and rinsing. I’ve done a pile of it. Haven’t done it in a few years, but it is all you need.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. xxcarguy

    xxcarguy Active Member

    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    212
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2019
    Location:
    Broken Arrow Oklahoma
    Super
    Thanks
     
  5. Fast Eddie B

    Fast Eddie B Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

    Messages:
    530
    Likes Received:
    418
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2016
    Location:
    Western New York
    I haven’t really driven the car much and now it is in the beauty parlor getting a new interior. I can’t even go check! The guy has a Covid fear and doesn’t like me dropping by. But he sends pics! Included below.

    My recollection is that it has not changed much. But re reading this thread got me thinking of some new stuff to test on some baffed out aluminum on a 64 caddy.

    78FAECE0-3542-47F0-8D1D-32558923B2B1.jpeg 6F01D96B-27BF-4A53-BB93-8FA8961EA9BA.jpeg 901E5E93-FA51-4449-B325-732D53C753AD.jpeg 5FD9DC9A-B1C4-460C-ADDE-5E4FFCA89F8B.jpeg
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Thanks! Thanks! x 1
  6. CudaChick1968

    CudaChick1968 The Mistress of Metal FCBO Vendor

    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    139
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Location:
    Greenfield, Tennessee
    I've found that the heavy duty store-brand / generic oven cleaner works better than the name brand Easy-Off.

    Take the parts off your car. Stand upwind, spray the pieces liberally and let them soak for a few minutes; it will foam up and gradually dispense into a clear liquid. DO NOT let it dry on there! Keep spraying the oven cleaner and letting them soak until you start to see a gray / brownish foam replace the white foam. Using something other than a bare hand to pick them up -- it's got lye in it -- pliers, chemical glove, etc., rinse them off with high pressure COLD water. You may need to repeat the process once or twice but it will strip them bare.
     
    • Thanks! Thanks! x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. thrashingcows

    thrashingcows Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,964
    Likes Received:
    1245
    Joined:
    May 15, 2012
    Location:
    British Columbia
    Read through this thread, ton of great info, but did not see one reference to using some #0000 steel wool to clean up the oxidizing on pieces. It finally clicked in my head a few years ago about using steel wool and the stuff saves so much time and effort when cleaning trim and other pieces, then just a quick buff and polish with your favorite compound and you're done. ;)
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

    Messages:
    13,422
    Likes Received:
    8277
    Joined:
    May 21, 2013
    Location:
    Marcellus, NY
    It's the quality. When you really start getting into it, there are much better microfiber towels out there. Plusher and less likely to scratch or leave swirl marks. Ever look at a black car that the owner uses old tee shirts when he waxes it? Lot's of swirls and very small scratches. Once you get into really doing it right, the towels become more important.

    Here's a little explanation.



    I don't use many of their products, but it's always decent info.

    I use a big, thick towel for drying. Some soft towels for wax etc., waffle weave towels for glass (once you use them, you won't use anything else) and I keep the Costco towels for the interior or wheels. There's nothing wrong with them, I just think they aren't near as good for the paint.
     
    • Thanks! Thanks! x 2
  9. xxcarguy

    xxcarguy Active Member

    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    212
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2019
    Location:
    Broken Arrow Oklahoma
    Will certainly try this tomorrow!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Fast Eddie B

    Fast Eddie B Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

    Messages:
    530
    Likes Received:
    418
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2016
    Location:
    Western New York
    I remember using steel wool. Went through a fair amount. The was some good instruction here earlier. I did all of mine in the basement over the winter. Had to ventilate. Only remember one application of oven cleaner, but did remove it with steel wool. I would google it.

    I am also going to grab some scrap and see what happens with muriatic acid.
     
  11. 3175375

    3175375 Senior Member FCBO Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,066
    Likes Received:
    1009
    Joined:
    May 16, 2018
    Location:
    Centerville, South Dakota
    I’ll await your test results. Oven cleaner is great on aluminum parts ( I had a couple of Corvairs, got one in the queue and may use it on the engine).
    The responses regarding ventilation and water are paramount. The comments regarding ventilation also reminds me when I baked some parts after painting them, in the oven when I lived in Kalifornia. The baking turned out a wonderful, durable finish, but 2 problems were created. 1) it stunk up the house terribly and 2) the ex was furious. Both problems solved as 1) I have a toaster oven in the shop (moved to South Dakota and have a shop large enough for a commercial oven), 2) divorced...
     
    • Like Like x 3