I'm transitioning out of the Military

73Coupe

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Chase excellence, not women.
Marrying these days is very risky business for guys, just a bad deal.

Sad but true. Unfortunately it's the age we live in. The boomers were the last generation where marriage made sense.
Most women have too many options in 2021.

@MightyMats , thank you for your service and good luck with what you decide. Sleep on it and look out for #1.
 
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70bigblockdodge

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Thank you for your service!
I did 5 and one month active in the USN. MM under the nuke power program it was a lot of school which my young self had no need for, I put no effort into it and failed out. The advanced rate and the 3 weeks stuck at school added my the 13 extra months. I hated the military life, but loved the travel, my 2 West Pac cruises are some of the most vivid/best memories of my life, (seems strange because alot of it was as the stereotypical drunken sailor). I also really loved being on my ship, grew a fond attachment to that old girl (I get very attached to mechanical things), makes me a little sad to think she's laying on the bottom of the Pacific. I gave a brief thought of re-upping, MM was a critical rate at the time (very nice re-enlistment bonus), I had plans to spend a chunk on down payment on a new dually pick up truck, ( all you old people save your breath about wasting it, it never happened).
I had no plan when I got out. I floated around ended up going to school and getting my FAA airframe and powerplant license. Then I became a truck driver. Could have saved my self the aggravation and did another 15, and still be a truck driver with a "F... You" check every month to keep a mouthy dispatcher in line.
My advice is to do the second half. Get the pension. I know it's not a dream job, but none are, and at least it has a end point.
 
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1978 NYB

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Thank you for your service!
I did 5 and one month active in the USN. MM under the nuke power program it was a lot of school which my young self had no need for, I put no effort into it and failed out. The advanced rate and the 3 weeks stuck at school added my the 13 extra months. I hated the military life, but loved the travel, my 2 West Pac cruises are some of the most vivid/best memories of my life, (seems strange because alot of it was as the stereotypical drunken sailor). I also really loved being on my ship, grew a fond attachment to that old girl (I get very attached to mechanical things), makes me a little sad to think she's laying on the bottom of the Pacific. I gave a brief thought of re-upping, MM was a critical rate at the time (very nice re-enlistment bonus), I had plans to spend a chunk on down payment on a new dually pick up truck, ( all you old people save your breath about wasting it, it never happened).
I had no plan when I got out. I floated around ended up going to school and getting my FAA airframe and powerplant license. Then I became a truck driver. Could have saved my self the aggravation and did another 15, and still be a truck driver with a "F... You" check every month to keep a mouthy dispatcher in line.
My advice is to do the second half. Get the pension. I know it's not a dream job, but none are, and at least it has a end point.

And a pension and lifelong health care.
 

65sporty

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Thank you for your service, I was Air Force and I got out at 3.5 years. My career field was being cut back and my mother in law was having health problems so my wife wanted to come home. With proof of employment at home I could get released from AD.
I have been a Auto Mechanic for the last 28 years. If I would have stayed in, my 20yr mark would have been 2009. I miss the planes and sometimes think what if I stayed, but the way things have worked out with my job and being available for my boys I wouldn't change anything.
John @live4theking give you some great food for thought, I don't have much to add other than talk it out with your wife, communication is key.
 

tbm3fan

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I've known three people who were in the Navy for various lengths but then left and went into the Reserve. Actually make that two who went into the reserves. The one who didn't was my nephew who got out after six years in nuclear engineering. He left because the work load and training load was so heavy he barely had time to sleep and eat. Sometimes he could only do one. He immediately went to the University of Minnesota to get a degree in geology. When he returned to California he ended up getting a job with a survey company in the Central Valley getting paid an unbelievable per hour rate for the last 6 years. Stuns me.

The second fellow left the Navy as a Captain in the submarine service. Got out and went into the reserves. In the meantime he got his law degree and went into practice. Along the way made Rear Admiral before he officially retired. He was then appointed to the Federal Court in San Francisco and after not so many years retired from there at 70.

The third is his son who joined the Navy as a pilot in the F-18. Good enough to fly two years with the Blue Angels and transitioned into an instructor around his eight year. He has a strong business background and discussed with his father about what to do. Father told him to get out and pursue his business career and go into the reserves like he did.

My brother spent six years back in 1974-1980 and got out as an A&P mechanic. Now he had a tougher time. Not a very good classical student in school but a gifted mechanic. Tried his own auto repair place for a couple of years. Left that and taught aircraft mechanics at a school near the Oakland Airport. Eventually got a job at United Airlines and now at 66 is one of their top trouble shooting mechanics for United. Unable to retire because of the debacle years back when United filed bankruptcy.

Anyway four case examples.
 
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3175375

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I worked with many pilots who retired from the military and/or were in the reserves, during my near 33 year career at Hughes Aircraft/Raytheon.
Many enjoyed the benefits a military retirement presented.
My uncle served for 8+ years active duty and then retired as a Commander in the Naval Reserves.
Good plan to continue your service to obtain that pension carrot!
 

MightyMats

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As requested an update.

Wife and I talked about it and made some compromises. 3 more years tacked on at the end of this year. Moving to the sunny state of Florida later on this year. No particular happy about it but this will be for the best. It will give me more time to get closer to my degree, buy a house, enroll in a university for my masters, and network for a corporate job. And my wife gets to move closer to her family who is moving down to Florida as well.
 

65sporty

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Thanks for the update. Best of luck with you future plans. With you wife's family there also it will be easier for her.
 

patrick66

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My sons were eight and five when I retired from the USAF in '99. My last two years in, I had 499 days of TDY. I'd had it. My command Chief tried to talk me into staying in. I'd just got off Stop Loss, and had missed MSgt by three-tenths of a point. I was tired, pissed and felt it would never end. I was ready to bail! Having missed much of my boys' early childhood being deployed, I'd earned my retirement, and had zero remorse in retiring at that point in time.

Your situation is different, but the same in certain ways. You aren't retiring, but are considering the Reserves after getting of active duty. Retirement bennies won't be yours until age 59. Medical and all that definitely differ from AD or retirees. Whn I retired, I literally walked across the street to my new job, which was teaching my old job to the new kids, and I did that for 16 years. Follow-on employment was easy for me. Consider ALL of your options!!! Family comes first and always.
 

1978 NYB

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I served 20 years (1976-1996) in the Army. It seemed like forever while I was in. I retired 26 years ago and now I look back and I'm thinking it was really a short time.
 

75LandYacht

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From one squid to another, I understand your frustration. When I joined the Navy in 1984 I certainly did not intend on doing 20, I was fourth generation Navy and my older son is now fifth generation. So not having any true direction after high school, I decided to follow the family footsteps and do some military time, That first 4yrs turned to 8 and then 12 and 16yrs, at that point the military had changed so much that I didn’t like what I was seeing and I was ready to go. I could not wait for the 20 year mark. I can see now after being out 18 years, that staying 20 was the right move as frustrating as it was. Yes if you finish your time in the reserves you will collect your pension, but as I’m sure you know at a much later age vis collecting as soon as you hit the 20.. The other benefit that did not occur to me at the time but I am much thankful for now is having full medical benefits for the rest of my life. You only have a short time to go to collect a well-deserved lifetime benefit. The next few years for you will fly by so fast it’ll make your head spin. So I say if you can stick it out! do it. But I understand there are variables that may dictate otherwise.

Just my 2 cents brother, thank you for your service.. I’m sure you’ll make the right decision.
 
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