Mini starter installation

ayilar

Old Man with a Hat
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On La Chrysler, the positive battery cable had to be retired after 300,000 miles and 55 years of service. National Moparts had a repop in stock.
Do they have repops for 1970 P/D/C models? I don't see any on their site.
 

Gerald Morris

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When I bought a mini starter I asked for one from a mid-90s Dodge pickup. It was the same as the one Leaburn shows.

The terminals wind-up sandwiched between the starter and the engine block, as Leaburn mentions. The terminal relocation kits that you can buy move them to the back of the starter, which is more convenient but not necessary. The most important thing is to remove the terminal block with the black plastic cover that comes with the starter. It won't fit with that on there.

Yep. I bought an American made Denso type starter from Tuff Stuff, but that damned terminal cover-adapter still just got in the way. At least they spared me the indignity of using SI wrenches.

I need to solder up the nice bit of #2 welders wire I bought for this job, and run it to the new battery I got last night... The Torture Never Stops!
 

jimmyessbee

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I thought that I've seen before that the terminals have to be relocated to fit on big block. Or did you get one for a specific vehicle to avoid the clearance issues?
My 64 came with a mini starter on it. One day it wouldn't start. After troubleshooting I found that the big terminal cable was loose. And that's how I learned that with the stock terminal locations in place, the cables have to be tightened with the starter removed.

I would suggest the terminal relocation kit. Likely, the reason the cable was loose on mine was because of the moving around after the cable was connected as they were trying to get it in place. A terminal relocation kit would have made that a non-issue. Plus, it would have made troubleshooting easier.
 

Mike66Chryslers

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My mini starter developed a slow start when hot problem. I thought it had gotten baked from header heat. So I removed the starter and discovered that the short wire between the solenoid and the main body of the starter had the rubber boot pinched under one side of the ring terminal during assembly. You could see where the terminal was burned from arcing. I fixed that, put the starter back in, and no more problem!
 

Gerald Morris

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My mini starter developed a slow start when hot problem. I thought it had gotten baked from header heat. So I removed the starter and discovered that the short wire between the solenoid and the main body of the starter had the rubber boot pinched under one side of the ring terminal during assembly. You could see where the terminal was burned from arcing. I fixed that, put the starter back in, and no more problem!

I might look at that if I twiddle that (not-so-)Tuff Stuff starter I used. Be this as it may, I actually prefer a slow starter, as my engine bumps to life VERY easily with an old style, slow starter, but with these damned Denso sorts they always spin the damned thing up, whether its good or not, I replaced the Tuff Stuff one w a PowerMaster which APPEARS to be an old style, permanent magnet Mopar starter, but that's as far as the resemblance goes. Its still a Denso. I'm going to rebuild the original starter that came with our '68, as it still works OK now, but shows symptoms of wear. Bushings, brushes and a good cleaning should put that ancient jewel back into excellent operating condition for future decades.

My main power lead consists of a #2 AWG welding cable, insulated by high temperature, cross linked nylon polymer stuff meant for hard use, with ultra-fine strands to insure optimal conductive surface area. This got crimped a bit for extra mechanical strength, then soldered into a copper lug on each end, and securely attached, nutted and insulated to prevent those possible arcs. A heat shield on the starter also protects the power stud from random conductors shorting it to ground.
 
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