1965 Fury New H4 Type Halo Headlights Dimming Out

65furyous

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OK, I wanted to update my front 4 headlights in my 1965 Plymouth Sport Fury. The lights that came with the car were old, 1 was burnt out, and I just wanted a newer look with the LED halo circle. After I finally got them all installed, I tried them out, the worked and looked great, for about 1 minute. With high-beams and low beams on, they dimmed and eventually fizzed out. I placed a volt meter on the light circuit and found, when initially turned on, I was only getting about 10v at the front lighting harness. As they stayed on, the voltage dropped to about 8.3 or so, then they fizzled out, with voltage bouncing all over. I read elsewhere on these forums that the dash light switch and floor dimmers were high-draw devices, and if suspected, should be replaced, which I did. That did totally improve the situation, but not completely. Now, low-beams only, voltage reads about 11v up front, and they stay on as long as I want. However, turn on the highs also, and it lasts longer than before, maybe 3 minutes, but then the voltage drops, and once below about 8V or so, they fizzle and dim out. If I put hit the floor dimmer switch and go back to low-beams only, the highs go out as they should, the lows stay on, and it's all good. Ideas???
 

CBODY67

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After the high beams dim, feel the foot dimmer switch plunger to see if it is HOTter than it used to be. IF the lights are going away due to a high-resistance item, that item should be hot from the resistance in it.

Are the "halos" operating as daytime running lights? If so, where are they getting their power?

BE SURE to aim your new lights to where they shine just below horizontal on a flat stretch of parking lot, bridge railing, or other completely horizontal surface you can see the main beam on at night. This is critical for best lighting performance. Also see where the beam strikes the rear of cars as you drive up on them on the street at night. Keep the low beams low enough to stay out of their mirrors, too . . . for vehicles with a similar ride height as yours is.

Also, aim the lateral adjustment such that the very left fringe edge of the lh low beam light pattern just touches the lane divider line, which will mean it is aimed slightly to the right rather than just completely straight ahead. Then aim the rh low beam a bit more to the right, so it will find the rh edge of the road and street signs. These things can take a bit of time to do at night on low-traffic roads, but will be good when done.

ONE other rhing is that you might like sitting BEHIND those bright white lights, BUT even with them aimed correctly, a thing like "high contrast light situation" can happen with oncoming drivers. That bright white light you're sitting behind, against a mostly black background, can cause older, oncoming drivers to temporarily have vision issues. By observation, much worse than the old "look to the right side of the road" advice when oncoming drivers did not dim their headlights as their vehicle approaches your vehicle. NOTE: these aiming suggestions are for countries where people drive on the RIGHT HAND side of the road, as in the USA.

There are several YouTube videos on headlight aiming. Probably something on Daniel Stern Lighting's website, too. Where you might also find some information on running the headlights via the factory harness and relays rather than using the existing factory harness wired direct.

With that much voltage loss, something's got to be getting really hot, I suspect. Hope you find the culprit soon!!

I had some friends, back in the later 1970s, who had installed Cibie E-code H4 7" round headlights in their '77 Camaros. I was amazed at the difference in light pattern there was between them and the USA beam pattern. It took some getting used to, but I liked it and have had several sets of (illegal, non-sealed beam) E-code Cibie and SEV-Marchal lights in the Camaro since then. I finally aimed them only on low beam, as that was usually what I needed, and let the high beams do their thing, if needed.

Prior to that, I had researched state-spec headlight aiming on the '66 Newport. I liked to drive at night and found the "aimed" height to not be very good. PLUS how the aiming machine was set-up could vary, too! I also played around with that on my Camaro, too, pre-E-Code lights.

Just some thoughts, experiences, and observations,
CBODY67
 

65furyous

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The LED Halos are being used as DRLs, I hopped off the marker lights from down low in the bumper, works perfect. They're low-voltage, so don't draw much off the markers, and look great. I replaced the floor dimmer right away, hoping to eliminate that as a possible issue (only about $6 at Rock Auto). I turned on the headlights and put on high, the floor switch does not get hot. The light switch in the dash was replaced also. For now I've simply unplugged the "upper" high-beam headlights, and am just running the lower low/high beam headlights, and that works, they don't dim. The all dim when all 4 are on, and lights are set to high. I never drive this at night, as of now, so I never actually turn them on. But I'd like this fixed just in case.
 
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cbarge

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You need a relay harness to take the load away from the lighting system.
Putco makes a harness for H4 and it is plug n play for our old cars.
 

300rag

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The LED Halos are being used as DRLs, I hopped off the marker lights from down low in the bumper, works perfect. They're low-voltage, so don't draw much off the markers, and look great. I replaced the floor dimmer right away, hoping to eliminate that as a possible issue (only about $6 at Rock Auto). I turned on the headlights and put on high, the floor switch does not get hot. The light switch in the dash was replaced also. For now I've simply unplugged the "upper" high-beam headlights, and am just running the lower low/high beam headlights, and that works, they don't dim. The all dim when all 4 are on, and lights are set to high. I never drive this at night, as of now, so I never actually turn them on. But I'd like this fixed just in case.
I am fairly certain that the high/low should be the top lamp and the lower should be high beam only, not that it would make a difference to the current draw.
 

cbarge

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Here are pics of the harness in our 69 Fury

20200524_182023.jpg


20200524_182017.jpg
 

HOT FURY

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I agree with CBARGE, I put a relay harness on mine and all my headlight woes were fixed when it no longer drew the operating power through the switch but directly from the battery. Painless wiring has a kit which I bought that is easy to install or you can get the plug adapters, relays, and wire to build one yourself.
 

CBODY67

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I suspect the reason the high beams get dim and go dark is due to the larger amp load on the circuit due to the new lights now in it. The factory headlight harness gets its juice directly from a full-power feed, directly. So there can be some protection against shorts and such, there is a circuit breaker hidden within the headlight switch itself. Seems like it is 30amps? Obviously, that unknownb circuit breaker has been there for decades, unless it is separate somewhere else.

Back in the later 1970s, when aux driving lights were somewhat popular (as in Cibie Oscars), a friend was working at an import auto parts pkace. He had a customer who had scored some used landing lights to use for driving lights. So he got them mounted and hooked up in place of the high beams. Worked great, lit up the night sky/roadways . . . for a short time, then went out. Rechecked everything, same result. Finally, when going through the obscure sections of a GM wiring schematic, I noticed something in the headlight switch, which looked to be a circuit breaker internal to the switch. Not a fuse, but a circuit breaker which would cut-off, cool down, re-complete the circuit, then cycle repeat as necessary.

That guy ended up running the landing lights via a relay and all was as desired.

So, that would explain the high beams not working continuously, I suspect.

Enjoy!
CBODY67
 

65furyous

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Ordering the kit now, thanks for all the input. That's what I suspected, but just wanted some more advice. My battery tests at 12.35V using a voltmeter, post-to-post. But my front wiring harness, with a new floor dimmer and new dash light switch, only reads about 10.9V-11V, so I'm losing some power thru draw and resistance already. The kit you're recommending looks to be the answer, getting me a full 12V to the front lights, directly from the battery. I'll post pics and reply once installed. Thanks again all.
 

65furyous

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I am fairly certain that the high/low should be the top lamp and the lower should be high beam only, not that it would make a difference to the current draw.
I'm glad you replied with that info, I couldn't find that online. I wasn't sure which light is supposed to be high/low (top or bottom), and which was high only. Thanks!!
 
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