1967 Plymouth Fury III 318

Restoration

  1. Furyus67

    Furyus67 Active Member

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    Pulled the engine again. Took the intake off. Looks like maybe they didn’t use RTV around the water jackets and each corner.

    Also are the two holes in the valley area normal? This is a 95 magnum engine.

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  2. RGORHAM29

    RGORHAM29 Active Member

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    Sorry Josh. I don’t have much to offer here as I haven’t been through this before. I wonder if the engine needs to be cleaned out from the “milkshake” to prevent/limit rusting? I see some in the water ports and on the gaskets. I look forward to hearing what others see/say.
     
  3. Furyus67

    Furyus67 Active Member

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    I cleaned all the oil and coolant out of the valley there. I replaced the intake manifold gaskets, used RTV around the water jackets and in all 4 corners. Torqued to recommended specs.
    I also replaced the rear main seal and the oil pan gasket. The rear main looked good. I think possibly the oil pan was leaking.
    Got the engine all back together and back in the car. It was a pretty successful day (well we'll see if everything works).

    I only had the motor running for a total of about 10 minutes. Some others have said to just drain the oil and I should be ok. I'll change it again right after running it my next time. Just keep an eye on it

    Waiting to get the transmission back in.
     
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  4. RGORHAM29

    RGORHAM29 Active Member

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    fantastic news!
     
  5. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Old Man with a Hat

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  6. RGORHAM29

    RGORHAM29 Active Member

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    So in his case - flush out the coolant system and change out the oil a couple times vs taking apart the engine and starting from scratch cleaning out all parts?
     
  7. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Old Man with a Hat

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    Glycol & Oil is a bad combination and in all my years as a mechanic I have never come across it (thank you lord) but in all the wisdom and stories I've heard from other 'retail' mechanics is that the engine would be junk and in just now a quick read is that even the littlest residual glycol left after a drain and wiping of the oil pan you will still have a chance of wiping the (all) bearings, even after several flushes. There is a method of flushing, several steps/times, think diesel trucks & heavy equipment but it's quite involved, google will lead you down that read. In your case I'd suggest a complete teardown and cleaning of the engine, inspect all bearing and replace for peace of mind. I think you still have a problem with the manifold, not RTV'ing the corners would give you a oil leak, you seem to have good gaskets and pressure sealing at the head water passages although the left rear by the distributor where the second intake manifold bolt hole is rusty would be a suspect area.
    You got to check your manifold to cylinder head flatness, this can be simple with the engine out by removing all gasket material and laying the manifold down , insert the bolts (but don't torque them, finger tight) for proper alignment and just shining a strong light and eyeballing it. Also check the manifold for cracks, get a large magnifying glass and check around the water passages if the manifold lies flat.

    Just a quick re-cap on this deal without me having to read through the whole thread again.

    Original 318 engine teardown showed rusted stuck ring pistons: Correct?

    You got a later model 318/360 'Magnum' engine: Correct?

    You had some old timer rebuild this 'Magnum' engine: Correct?

    You got like several options here: do several oil change flushes and hope for the best, if that works pass it along to someone else.
    A complete teardown and cleaning and checking, reassembly, pressure check the engine before running and installing in car (all at your cost)
    Button it back up and with all your documentation and witness's take it back to this engine builder and get your money back. Don't know how that will work if you payed out of your own pocket for this 'Magnum' (core) engine.

    Shit like this ends up in 'The Peoples Court'. Believe me I've come across several people that had 'Race Engines' built, 1 for a street Boss 302 & 2 other bonifide vintage race cars that right on the invoice since it was 'Race' built it said absolutely no guarantee, now these engines ran for awhile but seized or blew up and they were SOL.

    .
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2021 at 7:21 PM
  8. Furyus67

    Furyus67 Active Member

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    All your statements are correct. I've continued to read on the topic. Does an improperly sealed intake manifold lead to milky oil, like seen in my situation? Or does this only come from a blown/improperly sealed head gasket?

    Should I be worried the the head gasket is the culprit?

    Part of me wants to replace the intake manifold gasket, add the RTV and try again. See what happens. Another part of me wants to say eff it, take off the intake and the heads off and start over.

    Some have said that maybe the heads were milled flat too much and the dowel pins could be keeping the head sitting up too high and leaking.

    I think I'll just continue banging my head on the wall!!
     
  9. 68PK21 440.6bbl

    68PK21 440.6bbl Old Man with a Hat

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    Well if you had a head gasket problem like that with the dowel pins a compression test would show it. You could button the engine back up like with the intake & RTV put the engine on the engine stand, pull the pan and pressure test it with water. Make block off hoses for your heater & lower radiator, remove the thermostat and fill it with water and craft up a top hose adapter to a radiator pressure tester and pump it up like you would for a regular cooling system test and see if it holds pressure.
    Make sure you don't any leaks around your pressure tester adapter or other hose block off's or any air trapped in the block. And a spray bottle of soapy water will be handy to spot air leaks at the start.
    With the Oil pan off you could get one of those bore scope cameras thingys and snake it up into the valley area and have a look see, but I imagine it may be a PITA wiggling that thing around to the right spot. But you will still have the residual glycol in every oil passage and still in the bearings and the recommended flushing method using "Mix an ISO VG 32 R&O mineral oil 50/50 with Butyl Cellosolve" & then "Repeat steps 2 through 5, using a 60 percent R&O 32, 40 percent kerosene mixture" plus filter change every time, mopping out the pan, plus "Remove and inspect all main bearings, journals" etc. it's not a easy task. That method is best left to Tractor Trailer & Heavy Equipment where engine teardowns cost 10's of thousands of dollars.
    You might as well tear the whole fuker apart clean and inspect all surfaces & dimensions.

    But before you do all that what's the deal with the guy that build the engine? Will he stand behind it?

    .