65 New Yorker has AC!

Richard Reau

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Howdy fellas and fellettes,

I finally got the aftermarket AC installed in the 65 New Yorker last week, with the help of fellow forum member Dave Baro. Turns out Dave and I live just about 15 minutes from each other, and over the last couple of years we've become good friends.

The car already had a "knee knocker" AC system from Sears when I bought the car, but it was inoperable. Dave had a guy who was a crackerjack auto AC guy, and the plan was to have that guy get the old system running again with a new condenser, drier, and hoses. But the guy was flaky, so I decided to buy an aftermarket kit from a company here near Clearwater and install it myself.

I bought the kit from Coldmaster in Largo FL, not far from St. Pete. The complete kit was $650, which included about $50 in tax. It came with: evaporator, compressor, condenser, drier, hoses, fittings, wiring harness, various nuts and bolts, and a less-than-stellar instruction manual. The guy basically threw in the adapter bracket for the compressor.

Dave and I got the condenser mounted in a few hours on a Sunday, and I did the drier install the next day. The compressor was easy, I used Coldmaster's bracket which was a direct bolt-up to the old Mapes bracket that Sears had installed lo those many years ago. The evaporator was easy too...although the Coldmaster bracket would not work with the NYer, the old brackets off the Sears evaporator were an easy fit, and bolted directly into the old holes under the dash that the Sears unit occupied! Very fortuitous indeed. After all was plumbed and wired (the harness was clearly marked and easy to install), the system needed to be evacuated and charged. This is where Dave's buddy came in handy. I got him over to my shop and he had the thing blowing colder than Melania in no time. But that wasn't the end of the story...

Now the old radiator clearly was not up to the challenge of cooling the 413 through summer in Tampa. SO, I ordered a rad from Engineered Cooling Products in Chicago (shout out to my friend CBARGE for finding that for me). With a little tweaking I got the rad mounted and plumbed in a few hours (everything always takes longer, right?), and today was the first voyage with the new setup. So far so good, no overheating, and the AC is working very well.

Any constructive comment or questions are welcome. Internet troll DBs just move on.

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Richard Reau

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Yeah, if anyone has the big block Mopar plug wiring routing figured out, send me the diagram.
 

I84885

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Howdy fellas and fellettes,

I finally got the aftermarket AC installed in the 65 New Yorker last week, with the help of fellow forum member Dave Baro. Turns out Dave and I live just about 15 minutes from each other, and over the last couple of years we've become good friends.

The car already had a "knee knocker" AC system from Sears when I bought the car, but it was inoperable. Dave had a guy who was a crackerjack auto AC guy, and the plan was to have that guy get the old system running again with a new condenser, drier, and hoses. But the guy was flaky, so I decided to buy an aftermarket kit from a company here near Clearwater and install it myself.

I bought the kit from Coldmaster in Largo FL, not far from St. Pete. The complete kit was $650, which included about $50 in tax. It came with: evaporator, compressor, condenser, drier, hoses, fittings, wiring harness, various nuts and bolts, and a less-than-stellar instruction manual. The guy basically threw in the adapter bracket for the compressor.

Dave and I got the condenser mounted in a few hours on a Sunday, and I did the drier install the next day. The compressor was easy, I used Coldmaster's bracket which was a direct bolt-up to the old Mapes bracket that Sears had installed lo those many years ago. The evaporator was easy too...although the Coldmaster bracket would not work with the NYer, the old brackets off the Sears evaporator were an easy fit, and bolted directly into the old holes under the dash that the Sears unit occupied! Very fortuitous indeed. After all was plumbed and wired (the harness was clearly marked and easy to install), the system needed to be evacuated and charged. This is where Dave's buddy came in handy. I got him over to my shop and he had the thing blowing colder than Melania in no time. But that wasn't the end of the story...

Now the old radiator clearly was not up to the challenge of cooling the 413 through summer in Tampa. SO, I ordered a rad from Engineered Cooling Products in Chicago (shout out to my friend CBARGE for finding that for me). With a little tweaking I got the rad mounted and plumbed in a few hours (everything always takes longer, right?), and today was the first voyage with the new setup. So far so good, no overheating, and the AC is working very well.

Any constructive comment or questions are welcome. Internet troll DBs just move on.

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Hello just went to their site are the kits they are selling car specific or just different sizes
 

I84885

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That's a good question I84885. They could answer that one better than I could.
I was reading an older thread and they where mentioned in that one as well. I'm in orlando so I may need to pay them a visit. I'm glad to read you were satisfied with them
 

CBODY67

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My eyes saw ONE plug wire go through BOTH of the retention holes for #6 and #8, as if it was looped somewhere?
 

1970FuryConv

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Nice work. Glad you have AC in Florida.
It sounds like for their kit to work, you needed Sears brackets. Maybe for the kit to be more universal, you could send pics of the brackets you used to the company in Clearwater
 

Richard Reau

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Sorry again that I even bothered to post here. Yeah, it's a project car; it's not completely sorted; I'm still working on it. Obviously the DB trolls didn't read the last sentence of the original post. If anyone has questions about the kit, PM me. Otherwise I suggest you join the BMW2002FAQ forum where you'll find respectful gentlemen who don't seem to delight in taking down other forum members for any little issue. Rich out.
 

1970FuryConv

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Sorry again that I even bothered to post here. Yeah, it's a project car; it's not completely sorted; I'm still working on it. Obviously the DB trolls didn't read the last sentence of the original post. If anyone has questions about the kit, PM me. Otherwise I suggest you join the BMW2002FAQ forum where you'll find respectful gentlemen who don't seem to delight in taking down other forum members for any little issue. Rich out.
Wow. that's an overreaction. I made a suggestion to send the company pics of brackets that worked because theirs didn't.

You got plenty of compliments including from me. Take a chill pill and differentiate advice from criticism.
 

thethee

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Yeah, if anyone has the big block Mopar plug wiring routing figured out, send me the diagram.
On mine, the #8 plug wire goes the route where your #7 plug wire is so on top of the engine along the head. That way you avoid the downpipe in the manifold between #6 and #8. Then #7 plug wire goes with the rest of uneven along front of the engine as mine has the downpipe on that side after #7 cylinder. Only 1 factory bracket either side at the front on mine. But what probably helps best is to cut them to length a bit.

Hope this helps
 

USSMOPAR

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Interesting spark plug wiring in the first picture.
Why is it necessary to post this?
My eyes saw ONE plug wire go through BOTH of the retention holes for #6 and #8, as if it was looped somewhere?
How about you give advice on how to run spark plug wires on this engine since you seem to know so much?

And then post " Nice Car! very good craftsmanship". Show us your craftsmanship and we will return the old person nitpicking to you. I would love to see your work.

Nice car, great craftsmanship!
 

Loadrunner

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had the thing blowing colder than Melania in no time.

Lol

Yeah, if anyone has the big block Mopar plug wiring routing figured out, send me the diagram.

I have a big block here with original wires, can send pics.

I had got a set of NAPA wires for it, but never could go through changing the originals, since it runs fine.
 

volksworld

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i think half the problem is a "universal" wire set where everything's too long...you can get a W crimper and remove the terminals from the cap end and re use them after cutting the wires to a length that makes sense...idk if your plug boots are the correct angles either...on the r/s theres a loom that hangs off the front exhaust bolt for 2 and 4...there should be another 45 degree loom on the 2nd lower head bolt that 4 should go into...on yours 6 and 8 go over the top of the valve cover into the bracket on the cover and down (other years or HP manifolds ran #8 down the length of the cover and around the back to a bracket on the last bolt...thats why you prob have a #8 wire thats way too long....l/s also has loom off front manifold bolt , another one or 2 pretty much under the compressor that may not fit with your a/c deal, a 45 degree off the third lower head bolt and one on the last manifold bolt...1,3 and 5 go down in front of the head and hit the plugs from down below while 7 runs along the inside of the valve cover(theres a bracket on the cover for it) and down behind the engine to the bracket on the last manifold bolt then to the plug...hoffman winners circle parts has a good description of all the looms and where they go and for what years and searching google images for mopar big block wire looms will get some pics to go by....bty really like the underdash unit you got thinking of one of those for my 70 chevy pickup as i really dont want to rip out all the heater stuff i already restored for a hot rod setup...since i'm crazy i'm trying to get the rv2 setup working on the Fury
 
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CBODY67

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Just made an observation, no more, no less.

As generic as B/RB Chrysler engines are considered to be, there were MANY different spark plug wire routings. With the aftermarket not covering them all, specifically, or combining a few under ONE part number, which did not match what was on the car from the factory. So it became "match the new wire's length to where it needs to go", until the repro market arrived.

Spark plug routings can be observed in the FSM, but not specifically in an image with that title, but in other images of the front and sides of the motor, with the plug wires installed.

As to that rh valve cover with the spark plug bracket (same as on our '66 Newport 383 2bbl), the #6 and #8 plug wires come out of the distributor and are attached to that bracket via the "clear" snap-over retainers that then slide into the notches in the bracket, then continue downward to the respective spark plugs (with straight spark plug boots on them). No craftsmanship involved, just going from the distributor to the spark plugs via a bracket/support.

What is being termed "craftsmanship" is, in my orientation, "degree of execution". As to the routing of the plug wires. IF the wires had been built from bulk stock, THEN craftsmanship would be involved to ensure they worked correctly for a long time, regardless of the routing.

Thanks for that "old" observation. I graduated from high school in 1970, so I spent many Sunday afternoons going over our '66 Newport and learning about it at the same time. Took my driver's license driving test in it, too. Took it to college, too, learning to appreciate the over-the-road handling of it (with Chrysler HD shocks) in west Texas. The long distance radio reception, too! And that it liked to cruise in the 75-90mph range for hours at a time. To me, until you spend that amount of time, several times a month, in a car, paying attention to what its doing and how its doing it, when it "has fun" and when it is "bored", you CAN miss a lot of what made those Chryslers as great as they were, back then. A "total package". And we still have that '66 Newport Town Sedan, too.

Sorry if I might have offended the OP (or others) with my original observation. And YES, he has done a very good job with the car. Congratulations!

Take care,
CBODY67
 

crv

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I appreciate opinions/observations from more experienced members, who have been in the hobby much longer. I do not see anyone criticizing the work done on this car at all, which i think looks pretty cool.
 

Loadrunner

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The NAPA wires I bought 10 years ago and never used have "loose ends", you have to terminate them yourself, and after doing this a few time "with my teeth" read not with the right pliers, I bought the right pliers, which are still like new as I went to use them the other day and they were stupidly stiff and hard to open all the way, never used on anything bigger than 7mm wires.

Radio interference notwithstanding, I'm a big fan of Packard 440 straight up metal wire, and making my own from scratch. That's what I always did back in the old days, make your own.
 
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