Abandoned for 40 years: 1968 New Yorker 2 DR

Wrenchygeorgie

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Great pics of a job that isnt for the faint of heart. Looking at the way
that wiper motor sits flush like that, i think to myself , " ..wonder why
i haven't seen anyone make a cover for it"...
 

Isaiah Estrada

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Got started on floor repairs today. Had to be careful to not cut into the frame / support. Came out nice! Will be patching it in soon. We have been using C2C panels.

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The white stuff is a reaction between the rust and the metal prep rust remover I used! Here is the floor that was cut out …

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And so the journey continues! I have a lot of interior pieces now. I have a new carpet on the way from ACC, same for a new headliner… Going to try and re-cover the front seats myself. They’re off a 66 Chrysler 300. Will wait and have the rear covered by a pro; and they can also fix my 1967 300 door panels !

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Isaiah Estrada

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I also have been able to acquire a 67 disc brake booster for my 72 disc brake conversion!

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It is currently being rebuilt by Booster Dewey’s crew. Should have it back in about a month!
 

Isaiah Estrada

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Not the best but it’ll get the job done!!! It’s still not welded in, this is just a mock-up. We will hammer it down and shape it to the correct contour of the original floor.
 

Ghostultramarine

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I'm surprised I missed this thread but happy I found it! I bought a '68 Newport Convertible last spring and have been bringing it back to a daily driver and I can really relate to what you are doing.

I've always loved low riders and always wondered why there were never more Mopars. C Bodies lend themselves to being low very easily.

Keep up the great work - I know it seems like it's never ending now, but document all of your work, print out hard copies of the photos, put them in an album along with dates and write ups of key individuals and shops involved and some of your thoughts and that will be a real family heirloom and add a lot of personal value to the car. If you put this much work into a car, you are not going to flip it and sell it off. It will be one that will stay in your family.
 

Isaiah Estrada

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I'm surprised I missed this thread but happy I found it! I bought a '68 Newport Convertible last spring and have been bringing it back to a daily driver and I can really relate to what you are doing.

I've always loved low riders and always wondered why there were never more Mopars. C Bodies lend themselves to being low very easily.

Keep up the great work - I know it seems like it's never ending now, but document all of your work, print out hard copies of the photos, put them in an album along with dates and write ups of key individuals and shops involved and some of your thoughts and that will be a real family heirloom and add a lot of personal value to the car. If you put this much work into a car, you are not going to flip it and sell it off. It will be one that will stay in your family.

Thank you for the kind words!! It has been nothing but a labor of love with this car. When I bought it I thought, “Man, I STOLE it for $1,000!!!” … Yeah and then 2 years and nearly $20k later it still doesn’t run :poke: Nonetheless, we’ve kicked into overdrive and i am working every free day I have on the car!!!

There’s so many different types of lowlows, personally I’m into the early 70’s style where they were still “Mild Kustoms” but had a lowrider identity by then. Kind of a transitional era I guess? That’s the look I’m going for though! A Mild Kustom Lowrider!

The C Bodies aren’t popular because most folks who build lowriders and other show cars build them to sell them and make good money. They can do it quickly and build those cars from a catalog. C Bodies remind me of “Bomb” lowriders, pre 55 cars (mainly 1935-55) which are built with such precision and care just like other lowriders, however they are FULLY decked out with every accessory you can find. Since a lot of these cars are pre war or built around the end of the war the parts are VERY hard to find. Reminds me of how much of a hard time us C Body guys have finding some parts.

Also, GM vehicles are built body on frame which is ideal structure to make a car roll on 3’s and hop:) You can still juice a C Body but it can’t hop (I’m not a fan of hopping large cars like these.)

Thankfully, I’ve kept a good record of pics for this car! It’s going to be so awesome to look back at everything I’ve done when this car comes out. I can’t wait to share it here !! Thank you for your support and be sure to follow the thread for more updates :thumbsup:
 

Isaiah Estrada

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With the various brake parts coming from different years I would make a list and keep it some place where I would know where it was at.

Good idea! The disc brake setup i have thankfully came from the same 1972 C Body car. Should be easy enough to keep track of :thumbsup:
 

Gerald Morris

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Am DELIGHTED to see a young fellow of your heritage and culture getting a C body Mopar! OUTSTANDING! As a relatively recent owner of a '68 Newport convertible, I sympathize with you and might occasionally be able to help you. Mine is a true "barn find" which needs PLENTY work. You've done a superb job on that undercarriage. Now that I've copped an '83 Dodge Ram, we have something else to drive, which I hope to use in order to do more work on our family ride. That's right, I DRIVE C BODY MOPARS BECAUSE THEY'RE SUPERB FAMILY CARS!

Once you learn how perfectly designed these machines are, you'll never go back to either GM or Ford with any joy. I've always maintained my own vehicles, and let me tell you: slab side C body Mopars are the EASIEST THINGS MADE to repair and maintain! The large sizes make this so, AND Willem Weertman, the genius who did SO MUCH for Chrysler Corp with his peerless designs made them RUN.

Bienvenidos a Mopar Isaiah! Con mucho gusto.
 

Isaiah Estrada

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Am DELIGHTED to see a young fellow of your heritage and culture getting a C body Mopar! OUTSTANDING! As a relatively recent owner of a '68 Newport convertible, I sympathize with you and might occasionally be able to help you. Mine is a true "barn find" which needs PLENTY work. You've done a superb job on that undercarriage. Now that I've copped an '83 Dodge Ram, we have something else to drive, which I hope to use in order to do more work on our family ride. That's right, I DRIVE C BODY MOPARS BECAUSE THEY'RE SUPERB FAMILY CARS!

Once you learn how perfectly designed these machines are, you'll never go back to either GM or Ford with any joy. I've always maintained my own vehicles, and let me tell you: slab side C body Mopars are the EASIEST THINGS MADE to repair and maintain! The large sizes make this so, AND Willem Weertman, the genius who did SO MUCH for Chrysler Corp with his peerless designs made them RUN.

Bienvenidos a Mopar Isaiah! Con mucho gusto.

Muchas gracias, MoPar por vida!
 

Ross Wooldridge

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Be careful - a slip of the knife or an incomplete cut and it's rip/scratch and repair time for the door panel. Start by marking the 4 corners from the back with a very sharp awl - support the panel on a clean piece of wood. Then from the front side criss cross the square to the corner marks with a very very sharp knife, and carefully peel the fabric away from the hardboard underneath. Then you can cut the hardboard away with less fear of damaging the fabric.
 

Isaiah Estrada

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Doing some patch work on the firewall today. The insulation between the heater box and the firewall must’ve gotten soaked at one point and it made this particular area very weak. Had some holes coming through, poked around everywhere and it seemed fine though. Treated it with metal prep rust killer…

My work ain’t the best but it’s something!

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We cut and trimmed this new piece and ran it thru the planishing hammer and gave it the right diameter / curve. Good enough for the girls we date!

More to continue… the more I look at my car and how awesome it is, I think I want to change the color from black cherry to an ice blue / silver!

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Red does pop nicely though…

My New Yorker and I sometime in the ‘70s …

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IF ONLY :rofl:
 
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