Alternators, Starters, Wires, and Hard Starting

Electrical & Ignition

  1. bajajoaquin

    bajajoaquin Senior Member

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    Coming out of a job interview today, my '67 Imperial wouldn't start. Grr. (Yes, I made sure to wear a suit and tie while driving the Imperial. I figure it's really the only appropriate attire :) )

    Solenoid clicked, but no turn.

    Got it jumped, and made it to the gas station, where it started a bit slow, but normally. From there, I went to my local garage, who said the battery was fine, but the alternator was a bit lazy. This guy replaced my voltage regulator for me when I first got the car, and didn't have anywhere to work on it.

    It looks like an alternator is about $25-$30.

    I'm guessing that part of my problem is heat: it was hot, and old wires, corrosion here and there, all made for added resistance in the circuit.

    I also have one of the original-style starters, not the mini-starter.

    So what are the recommendations? Replace alternator, for a start.

    Is it worth getting new/bigger wires to go to the starter?

    Do starters wear out by drawing more current before failing?

    Having replaced the voltage regulator in the last 8 months, should it be replaced with the alternator, or is it totally unrelated?
     
  2. 70NPORT

    70NPORT Old Man with a Hat

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    Wow. Deja Vue all over again. I just replaced my starter cable because of a higher than normal resistance problem. Unless you don't mind a remanufactured unit, a good alternator is going to cost more that $30....do you know what amperage output you need? I have a 65 amp alternator because I have an a/c model (70' Newport 383/ac). I would look into that if you haven't already. Anywhere you find corroded/exposed wire you need to replace it. If it's just exposed but otherwise intact (no corrosion) you can re-wrap with heat shrink wrap if the insulation isn't too far gone. Corrosion/Exposure=BAD. I went with the same cable size for my starter cable (6' x #4 AWG) that was original.

    Starters: I like mini starters b/c they are stronger, lighter, and turn the motor over quicker...even on the hottest days. You have to be careful however, I've seen mini starters sold by various vendors that have the same cranking pwr the stock Chrysler starter has....so your paying for it to be smaller but not stronger. If you buy a mini buy it should be because it has enough cranking power (torque) to surpass the stock stater motor..AND its or you might as well as stick with the big stater.
     
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  3. bajajoaquin

    bajajoaquin Senior Member

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    I saw your thread "Second Time in Three Years" right after I posted mine, but I didn't finish reading it. Did your description above solve the problem?
     
  4. bajajoaquin

    bajajoaquin Senior Member

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    Just checked FSM. AC cars are supposed to have 44 +/- 3 amps. (For other reference standard is 34.5 and "Special Equipment" is 51.) So I'll check that I'm getting something with that current or better. Thanks for the heads up.
     
  5. 70NPORT

    70NPORT Old Man with a Hat

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    Yep. So far so good. I made the repair/upgrade about a week ago now and the car turns right over no matter how hot it gets. I'm quite pleased.
     
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  6. 70NPORT

    70NPORT Old Man with a Hat

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    No problem. 44 amps? for a/c car? I guess if that's what the FSM is saying than that's what you should go with. You definitely do not want an alternator that's over powered (for your car) and eventually fry your wires.
     
  7. 78Brougham

    78Brougham Deplorable FCBO Gold Member

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    If i remember correctly, alternators no matter what there rating will only put out whats required of them. As the load increases, the output to the battery increases, keeping up with the draw, to a point. If you manage to find a little bigger amp alternator I don't think it would hurt anything. I can't remember what the rating is on the 67. But a few more amps such as a 65 would work better.
     
  8. 70NPORT

    70NPORT Old Man with a Hat

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    You may find the section "MASTER CHARGE: Alternators and Generators" very insightful. You want to be precise and careful when it comes to upgrading the electrical system of your car. Everything works together in unison.

    http://www.allpar.com/history/mopar/electrical.html
     
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  9. 65sporty

    65sporty Old Man with a Hat

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    nice article on alt's should be very help for all
     
  10. wihaltom

    wihaltom Member

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    What is the alternator amp rating for a 66 300 with A/C?
     
  11. 70NPORT

    70NPORT Old Man with a Hat

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    Dont know off hand, Should say in the FSM.
     
  12. wihaltom

    wihaltom Member

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    I don't have a manual yet.
    I really need to get one.
     
  13. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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  14. wihaltom

    wihaltom Member

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    Thanks so much for that link.
    I think my alternator died this evening on the way to a show.
    I did the "jumper between BAT and FLD" test and the battery voltage didn't change so i guess the alternator has had it.
    I'll take it off and get it tested tomorrow.

    Got the manual downloaded.
    It shows 44 amps +/- 3.
    Most of the parts houses list a 60 amp alternator for that year car except NAPA.
    They show a 34 amp and a 60 amp.
    Bosch remanufactured.
    These reman parts are kind of a crap-shoot, in my experience, tho.
    Thanks again for the link.
     
  15. 70NPORT

    70NPORT Old Man with a Hat

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    That sucks. I know we've all been there at one time or another.
     
  16. Big_John

    Big_John Illegitimi non carborundum FCBO Gold Member

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    You can rebuild the alternator yourself. It's not that hard.

    Most likely you'll only need brushes and diodes. No special tools unless you need to change the front bearing and then you just need a puller for the pulley and you can probably "rent" that for free at Autozone.
     
  17. wihaltom

    wihaltom Member

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    I took the alternator to O'Reilly to get it tested.
    Their tester was broken, but the counter man said, since I had done the jumper test that the unit was most likely dead.
    It was a lifetime warranty remanufactured 60 amp unit so he gave me another one.
    I went ahead and bought a new, electronic voltage regulator for it, just to be safe.
    Got everything installed and fired it up.
    Everything works great.
    I tested the old voltage regulator and it tested good so I put it in the spare parts box for the Chrysler.
    I have to keep my spares separated because of the other two cars I am working on.
     
  18. mgm1986

    mgm1986 Active Member

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    Glad you got it figured out, charging systems can be a finicky thing!

    Curious, you said you tested the old voltage regulator. Was that a bench test or just put it back in the car and see what happens? I'm curious if there is an easier bench test than what I've found on the World Wide Web!
     
  19. wihaltom

    wihaltom Member

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    I used a VOM to check the voltage level on the "Field" terminal and applied voltage to the "Ign" terminal.
    As I varied the voltage input with a couple of resistors, I could watch the output change.
    Not a true reliable test, but it showed me the regulator was working.
    I need to add that this is an electronic regulator, not mechanical.
     
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  20. Mr onetwo

    Mr onetwo Active Member

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    What a great article.....thanks for the link!!!! I love this forum:yourock:
     
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