Help with 413 engine ID

Engine, Transmission & Driveline

  1. SGT FURY

    SGT FURY Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg Picked this 63 413 engine today. Built 2/8/63 was in a old engine rebuilder shop. When business closed. Engine was stored outside under tarp so it is seized. Has rebuild tags.
    Says its 60 over.
    My questions for you guys are is this a industrial 413? It's has gear drive?
    I didn't have to give much for it. I would like to use it in a 62 300.
    I seem to remember hearing something about industrial motors turning backwards?
    Another question is will 361 383 harmonic balancers work?
     
  2. SGT FURY

    SGT FURY Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    If this is a industrial 413, is it usable for a car? What are the differences from industrial motors?
     
  3. 69PHOENIX

    69PHOENIX Member

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    G'Day,
    Not an Expert but I do know some Trucks (361CI from my experience) ran with D/D timing gears as well as a Governor mounted under the Dizzy.
    They also had Sodium filled valves from memory.
    Some of the Marine Applications ran in Reverse to balance the Thrust of the other Engine in Twin Engine Configurations.
    (Otherwise the boat would have a Tendency to keep trying to go in Circles.)
    I have a few sets of NOS Direct Drive Gears & have been tempted to try them.
    I'm thinking 100% timing Accuracy, No Stretched Chains / Play Etc.
    But you also need to run a Reverse Rotation Cam & some other Gear.
    Not sure I'm Bright enough to work out the Details. LOL
    The "Industrial" would be reflected mainly in Inlet / Outlet Manifolding & Perhaps Piston Compression ratios.
    (Lowish Compression, Not designed for High Revs so much but rather Bulk Torque & Longevity)
    I seem to remember that some of the Truck / Industrial Engines had Hardened Bores Etc to make them Heavier Duty.
    The Advantages would lie in the Bore wall Thickness, If you have the right Block it will bore out to 440 + 60 perhaps even further If I'm correct.
    I also vaguely remember there being something "Special" about the Cranks as well.
    If you look at the back of the Block there should be a 1/2" thick circular Pad behind each of the back cylinders, where they would tap & plumb fittings
    to run the water through the Block (For Marine Applications) rather than recirculate it as in a car.
    All of this from an Old Man's Memory and I don't Trust it Myself.
    So it would pay to do some Research.
    Regards Tony.M
     
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  4. Rustyrodknocker

    Rustyrodknocker Active Member

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    I don't know what drive the need for reverse rotation in an industrial application. Its common in dual engine boats to have opposing rotation to equalize thrust forces.
     
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  5. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    This engine has the industrial gear drive for the cam shaft. The truck-industrial engine had the high mount water pump with the discharge ports mounted to the "dash" heads. (photo below) It also has the low compression pistons typical of a truck/motor home/industrial engine. The industrial engine could be ordered either in a CW or a CCW rotation as noted above. My best guess is that this is either a passenger engine with an industrial gear set that was converted to low compression or a truck/industrial engine to start with. The casting numbers are usually the same for both.

    The truck engine usually has a different crank shaft number so you might want to try and reference that number to see which crank the engine has. The truck crank usually had a larger rear flange.

    Dave

    413 Truck Engine #1.jpg
     
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  6. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    2nd photo showing pump mount.

    Dave

    413 Truck 2.jpg
     
  7. CBODY67

    CBODY67 Old Man with a Hat

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    "Industrial" would also include irrigation pump motors.

    CBODY67
     
  8. SGT FURY

    SGT FURY Well-Known Member FCBO Gold Member

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    image.jpeg Thanks for replies, I see that the crankshaft flange has 8 bolts. I assume that it takes a special flex plate or flywheel that may be hard to find?
    It looks like a may only be able to use the block?
     
  9. Davea Lux

    Davea Lux Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    The eight bolt crank is a truck crank, if memory serves me correctly, the eight bolt pattern is the same as the later Hemi engines, so it might be possible to use a Hemi fly wheel or flex plate. Truck crank is not designed for high rpm usage though.

    Dave
     
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  10. 70bigblockdodge

    70bigblockdodge Old Man with a Hat FCBO Gold Member

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    You may be able to use the crank, you will just have to get a Hemi flex plate. If you have access to a "regular" RB crank that would be easier.
     
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