Power Steering Stop Leak

darth_linux

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I know the correct answer to this question is to pull and repair/replace the steering gear box, but my question is, can some Power Steering Stop Leak buy me some time? It doesn't leak a lot, just enough to annoy Mrs. darth_linux when she looks at the driveway where I park the Newport.
 
That **** only works on seals, and none too well. Try it, but don't get your hopes up. Price a new steering gear. They can be had for under $200. I bought a BBB one about 4 yrs ago which didn't lose a drop.
 
That **** only works on seals, and none too well. Try it, but don't get your hopes up. Price a new steering gear. They can be had for under $200. I bought a BBB one about 4 yrs ago which didn't lose a drop.
Yeah, FirmFeel wants $725 less the core return. I found an online place offering it for $240. I guess I just want to get another year out of it before I replace it. Talking <50 miles a month for the next 7 months, then it gets parked for the winter.
 
Might look for some "MaxLife with Stop Leak" power steering fluid. It and the similar ATF has some seal expanded additive in it. I like that approach from a major motor oil company better than getting the seal expander separately. The additive is supposed to only swell the rubber seals about 1%, to compensate for age and such, but that might be all that is needed. When you get the new chuck, then use the fluid the rebuilder recommends. Only thing it is red in color, which makes it look too much like ATF, to me.

Some spray brake cleaner can help get those drip spots handled quickly and easily, usually.

Enjoy!
CBODY67
 
Yeah, FirmFeel wants $725 less the core return. I found an online place offering it for $240. I guess I just want to get another year out of it before I replace it. Talking <50 miles a month for the next 7 months, then it gets parked for the winter.
The stop leak is snake oil and might work with a small drip, but if it's leaking that bad, it's not going to do anything except probably make it more expensive to repair down the line.

My suggestion is to spend $15-20 at your local parts store for a big drip pan and shove that under the car each time you park in your driveway. I've even tossed a scoop of Speedy dry or clay cat litter in the pan to absorb the oil so you can just dump it in the trash. A big piece of thick cardboard will work instead of the pan if you don't have a pan.

Get the box out when you can and do it right.

$_57.jpg
 
Might need to place a concrete 12" square stepping stone (from a big box DIY store) or two brick pavers (from a similar location) to anchor the pan/cardboard. Just don't drive on them.
 
Good Day
When you look at replacing the gear (down the road), check out 'Steer & Gear' (Columbus Ohio).
 
Might need to place a concrete 12" square stepping stone (from a big box DIY store) or two brick pavers (from a similar location) to anchor the pan/cardboard. Just don't drive on them.
That's a good idea.

I have driven over drip pans... and drain pans full of oil.... and sunglasses etc.
 
I have used the LLoyds power steering conditioner and stop leak with great success. I would try it if I were you. It sealed up the rack in the 88 Cougar and lasted for 3 years till the car went to the Big Ford Roundup in the sky! Lindsay
 
All good ideas, or you could find the leak point and it may not be that hard to fix it. And then save the big bux on a rebuilt box.
 
I have used Steer and Gear for all my rebuilds. They do good work. The stop leak has never worked for me. I only did it on a pump that I ended up replacing.
 
I've been told 1 capful of DOT 3 brake fluid added down your auto transmission dipstick tube works wonders in swelling up transmission seals... (never done it myself)

.
 
All good ideas, or you could find the leak point and it may not be that hard to fix it. And then save the big bux on a rebuilt box.
Pretty sure it’s the seal on the side where the steering column shaft goes into the steering gearbox.
 
Pretty sure it’s the seal on the side where the steering column shaft goes into the steering gearbox.

Take it to a good carwash w an engine cleaner detergent, dribble that stuff liberally on your gearbox, and see if that's the only gasket leaking after rinse. If so, you MIGHT be able to do the job yourself. I still like the stuff from BBB if you're on a tight budget. More Information for BBB INDUSTRIES 5020106

Admittedly a crapshoot, but not a high dollar one. I changed mine out on our '66 one Turkeyday, and it worked perfectly. Easy job actually. Get the stuff for the steering coupler pot when you do yours. That can be found and rounded up for around $30.

Those '66 C bodies are GREAT to work on! I LOVE all the slab side ones. Best DIY cars made on this planet.
 
Take it to a good carwash w an engine cleaner detergent, dribble that stuff liberally on your gearbox, and see if that's the only gasket leaking after rinse. If so, you MIGHT be able to do the job yourself. I still like the stuff from BBB if you're on a tight budget. More Information for BBB INDUSTRIES 5020106

Admittedly a crapshoot, but not a high dollar one. I changed mine out on our '66 one Turkeyday, and it worked perfectly. Easy job actually. Get the stuff for the steering coupler pot when you do yours. That can be found and rounded up for around $30.

Those '66 C bodies are GREAT to work on! I LOVE all the slab side ones. Best DIY cars made on this planet.
Thanks for the tip. I own a pressure washer, and the steering/suspension components are absolutely coated with 1/2" of thick grease pretty much everywhere, so I will be during a thorough degreasing of all of that business over my spring break that's coming next week. After that I can probably just lay under the car for 10-20 minutes and find the exact source of the leak.

You say there's gasket there that's an easy fix? Not some seal deep inside?

What's the steering coupler "pot" you are referring to? Never heard of that unless you mean the rubber hockey puck thingy.
 
Thanks for the tip. I own a pressure washer, and the steering/suspension components are absolutely coated with 1/2" of thick grease pretty much everywhere, so I will be during a thorough degreasing of all of that business over my spring break that's coming next week. After that I can probably just lay under the car for 10-20 minutes and find the exact source of the leak.

You say there's gasket there that's an easy fix? Not some seal deep inside?

What's the steering coupler "pot" you are referring to? Never heard of that unless you mean the rubber hockey puck thingy.

NOT the hockey puck! That's a "rag joint coupler" which is best replaced w one meant for Landrovers nowadaze. The pot coupler is the one right above the shaft of that steering gear, usually orange colored, or, on a '66, black. Its what joins the shaft to the steering hear.

The most likely gasket somewhat near the "top" of your gearbox is the worm shaft oil seal. From the 1966 FSM: C 15, Steering, p22
1679973368439.png



Hmm, best you wash that gear body off completely before speculating on any gaskets. Look in the FSM for how its laid out. if you're not sure, best to leave it alone.
 
Should be some "exploded views" in the FSM, too.

I would degrease carefully as what's under that coating will most probably RUST once that coating is removed and left bare . . . if not repainted soon thereafter. Spray brake clean can work well, too, without all of the activities of a pressure washer, it seems to me.

Just some thoughts,
CBODY67
 
Should be some "exploded views" in the FSM, too.

I would degrease carefully as what's under that coating will most probably RUST once that coating is removed and left bare . . . if not repainted soon thereafter. Spray brake clean can work well, too, without all of the activities of a pressure washer, it seems to me.

Just some thoughts,
CBODY67
I’m not too worried about about tie rods and swaybars getting a bit rusty. Thank you though!
 
Should be some "exploded views" in the FSM, too.

I would degrease carefully as what's under that coating will most probably RUST once that coating is removed and left bare . . . if not repainted soon thereafter. Spray brake clean can work well, too, without all of the activities of a pressure washer, it seems to me.

Just some thoughts,
CBODY67

As you WELL know, that '66 FSM is probably the most detailed and explicit of the lot. It taught ME PLENTY about these and even the B body cars, by way of comparison and similarity.

Regardless of how the cleansing occurs, once done, one can see, then repair. Given the amount of dirt described, I figured the car wash engine wash would be the best tool. These do NOT apply at high pressure, though the rinse certainly is. For those who lack experience with these, BE DAMNED SURE TO PUT A HEAVY TRASH BAG OVER THE CARBURETOR, DISTRIBUTOR AND ALTERNATOR before starting the wash.

The car wash can SAVE money and time, used wisely, but it also can CO$$$T a fortune if negligent mistakes get made.

Proper Prior Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance.
 
As you WELL know, that '66 FSM is probably the most detailed and explicit of the lot. It taught ME PLENTY about these and even the B body cars, by way of comparison and similarity.

Regardless of how the cleansing occurs, once done, one can see, then repair. Given the amount of dirt described, I figured the car wash engine wash would be the best tool. These do NOT apply at high pressure, though the rinse certainly is. For those who lack experience with these, BE DAMNED SURE TO PUT A HEAVY TRASH BAG OVER THE CARBURETOR, DISTRIBUTOR AND ALTERNATOR before starting the wash.

The car wash can SAVE money and time, used wisely, but it also can CO$$$T a fortune if negligent mistakes get made.

Proper Prior Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance.
Yeah, I was thinking power washing from below not above. just enough to get the steering and suspension parts. The top of the engine is pretty clean already. Alternator is new, carb is new, distributor is new.
 
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