What's the best plan for this rust at the rear window?

MBar

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1972 Fury 4DR Sedan...'m loving my original paint, imperfect as it is... My concern is this rust. My initial plan was to order a windshield (got it) and I spoke with the installer. He will pull the rear window and then I figure I can do something about the rust while he replaces my front windshield and hopefully be done in time for him to re-install the rear window.
I know there's no guarantee of what I'll find but I'm hoping to benefit from the forum's experience to have an idea what to expect... I'm thinking wire brush and paint with encapsulator, assuming it's not too bad.
Another thought I have is to remove the trim myself and dig into the area and explore without removing the window, possibly fix the area and then either repair or more likely have the installer repair the seal or reinstall the window... The advantage is I would have time to deal with the rust without pressure that the installer is there.

The rest of the window area is clean....

All responses are appreciated

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furious70

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I would not expect to have time to do anything but a very quick wire brush and por15 while the installer is there. Likely have to fill holes with goop.
 

57fury440

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The best solution would be to have the glass removed like you plan. I would not rush to have it finished before he finishes the windshield but would do a proper repair which may take some time. You could always have the installer come back another time to put the glass back in.
 

MBar

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The best solution would be to have the glass removed like you plan. I would not rush to have it finished before he finishes the windshield but would do a proper repair which may take some time. You could always have the installer come back another time to put the glass back in.
Thank you... Is there a possibility that I can remove the rear window myself? Or maybe dig out the seal around the affected area?
 

CBODY67

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Those bubbles will probably have holes under them, which will need to be cleaned and alumaleaded before putting the rear glass back in place. "AlumaLead" is a 3M body shop product which came to market just in time for the similar GM cars to have issues in that lower rear glass area. Goes on and works like bondo, as I recall. If you try to "band-aid" it for the time being, you'll end up having to fix it right later on.

Many times, those glass installers can do quality work quicker than you might suspect. So you might schedule the front glass stuff, get the rear window removed, then get it cleaned up and gooped, then re-schedule for the rear glass installation at a different time. Might need to get a rent car during the time the rear glass is out, if needed.

Then, after the alumalead procedure is done and cured, get some paint mixed to make it look a little bit better, as desired.

Just some thoughts,
CBODY67
 

CBODY67

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Thank you... Is there a possibility that I can remove the rear window myself? Or maybe dig out the seal around the affected area?
That glass is reasonably heavy AND bulky. Not to mention the size of it, which can require some good muscle strength with your arms extended. Unless you've been feasting on Wheaties, it is usually a two-person job.

Certainly, with the glass removed, you can then do whatever is needed to be done yourself.
 

69PHOENIX

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G'Day,
Two Men, Two 12" Lengths of Broom Handle & Piano Wire.
After Removing the Chrome Moulds. (Gently & Carefully)
Feed the Piano Wire Between the Glass & Body, (Through the Goo) Connect the Broom Handles Each End and Gently Saw Backwards & Forwards
All the Way Around until You Have Separated the Glass away from the Body.
NOTE: You Will Get Hooked Up on the Mould Clips, Work Your Way Around them VERY Gently as You Risk Cracking the Glass.
BEST ADVICE: Get the Windscreen Fella to Pull It For YOU !
Unless You have Spare Moulds, Glass & Experience That's My Advice.
Others Please Advise If I'm Wrong.
( I Remember the Last Time I was Wrong, It was June of 1954......LOL)
Regards Tony.M
 

Jim 68cuda

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Also, assume that most of the trim clips (front and back) are likely not going to be reusable. Buy new trim clips and have them on hand before the front and rear glass is replaced.
 

Big_John

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G'Day,
Two Men, Two 12" Lengths of Broom Handle & Piano Wire.
After Removing the Chrome Moulds. (Gently & Carefully)
Feed the Piano Wire Between the Glass & Body, (Through the Goo) Connect the Broom Handles Each End and Gently Saw Backwards & Forwards
All the Way Around until You Have Separated the Glass away from the Body.
NOTE: You Will Get Hooked Up on the Mould Clips, Work Your Way Around them VERY Gently as You Risk Cracking the Glass.
BEST ADVICE: Get the Windscreen Fella to Pull It For YOU !
Unless You have Spare Moulds, Glass & Experience That's My Advice.
Others Please Advise If I'm Wrong.
( I Remember the Last Time I was Wrong, It was June of 1954......LOL)
Regards Tony.M
This is the way to do it. Remove the inside trim too.

One tip I was shown a long time ago is to use 6' or so of piano wire. Thread it through the outside of the "goo" (good term for it) at the top center of the window and then down through the goo on the bottom center of the window. Now wrap the piano wire on whatever handles you want (I always just used vise grips) and standing outside the car, you can saw that window out in half the time without a helper inside the car.

A pair of these make it easier to handle, but a big window like that will require a helper to lift it out. Harbor Freight has these..

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MBar

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Also, assume that most of the trim clips (front and back) are likely not going to be reusable. Buy new trim clips and have them on hand before the front and rear glass is replaced.
Wow...great advice ...thank you! I did a search and this is what I found...are these the correct ones to order?

CBody clips.jpg
 

MattfromMaine

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Just did this in November. Called the local glass shop and they came over, took it out, came back when the metal work was done and put it back in. Front and back glass. $200. Was worth every penny.
 

Jim 68cuda

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Wow...great advice ...thank you! I did a search and this is what I found...are these the correct ones to order?
The description sounds correct. They look right to me, but hopefully someone familiar with fuselage era C bodies will confirm. Any replacement clips need to be installed before your new gasket and the glass are installed. You should also have the new gasket on hand before the glass installer gets there if its a rubber gasket, or the rubber windshield sealant tape if that's what your car uses instead.
 
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CBODY67

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You should also have the new gasket on hand before the glass installer gets there if its a rubber gasket, or the rubber windshield sealant tape if that's what your car uses instead.
From my experiences, many glass companies like to supply their own sealants and such. That way, they can give you a warranty against leaks and such as time progresses. Even years in some cases.

Enjoy!
CBODY67
 

MBar

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Ok... Before anything else, I used a scraper and knocked off those bubbles. Sure enough, a couple of holes.. I was able to pry the trim up. The goop is dried up pretty good.. I used a screwdriver and the scraper and then wire-wheeled with my Dremel. Shop-vac and then POR15. The trim didn't go back down all the way, probably something to do with the clips. I left it as is (not so bad) for now. It parks in the street but should be fine..
If anyone can please confirm the clips I found (above), I'll order them.
As far as the rust, is alumalead simple and easy to get?... Or is some JB Weld ok?

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Big_John

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From my experiences, many glass companies like to supply their own sealants and such. That way, they can give you a warranty against leaks and such as time progresses. Even years in some cases.

Enjoy!
CBODY67
I've seen where they want to use the "new" types of adhesives rather than the tried and true 3M Windo-Weld ribbon sealer. I can't say if that's good or not, but it seems to me that the ribbon sealer has more "give" in it and our old cars probably flex more than a new(er) car.

I could be completely off on that thinking though. I've never used any of the modern urethane adhesives.

BTW, since it was brought up, the OP's rear window is held in with ribbon sealer and not a gasket, just so we all start talking about the same thing.
 

fury fan

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Those clips look correct. AFAIK, Chrysler used the same trim clip around all windshields, at least in the 60s-70s.
And it's been said, but hasn't really been stressed - the clips are likely near-impossible to install if the glass is in.

IMO, it doesn't matter what you fill those holes with until you KILL that rust. And the rust is on the underside also (but that is less of a worry).
And if you're not going to paint it ('correctly') it doesn't matter how nice you smooth it out.
If you got the rust killed, you could fill those holes with some firm-set caulking and put touch-up paint on with a brush.

I have brushed-on white Rusto in 2 spots at my back glass and nobody except me has ever noticed it.

Sometimes fast preservation beats waiting on proper restoration.
 

68PK21 440.6bbl

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BTW, since it was brought up, the OP's rear window is held in with ribbon sealer and not a gasket, just so we all start talking about the same thing.
Hate to be a stickler John but from the 1973 FSM (Body Service) it called "Butyl Tape" now I know over the decades certain brands and other ideas it maybe called something else or if you use the wrong terms you may get someone's else idea.
Kind of like 'That'll Work' phrase and leading to leaks.
Read the FSM and it's pretty simple on how to do it right (leak free).

1973.FSM.BUTYL.TAPE.jpg


For anyone else confused with older terms "Fence" would be considered 'Channel' or 'Window channel'.


.
 

Big_John

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Hate to be a stickler John but from the 1973 FSM (Body Service) it called "Butyl Tape" now I know over the decades certain brands and other ideas it maybe called something else or if you use the wrong terms you may get someone's else idea.
The 3M Windo-Weld is a butyl tape. Different name, but I get what you are saying.

I had to buy some last year for my Ford Ranger rear window. Amazon product It's the same stuff I bought 45+ years ago when I changed my first windshield. There are other suppliers that call it out as butyl tape, but I know the 3M stuff does the job.
 
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