1971 Fury GT, Gold, Promo Car

71FuryGC

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The steel coated prebent lines are nice OE appearing with the shielding on them. Since I doubt you'll be driving this in any severe weather I'd go that route as they'll probably last as long as the car. I use the copper/nickel stuff on my 20-30 year old beaters whenever I need to do lines.
Do you have a link to a reputable supplier plz? Thanks.
 

1970FuryConv

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I'm not doing anything until the subframe is done. I want to make sure I don't have to buy another, or worse, a parts car.
It was sandblasted this weekend, but a 2nd sandblast needs to be done.
They are planning to break off the welds for badly bent left side mount flange so it can be bent back into correct shape.
They are hoping to start welding Wednesday night
Views from below.
PXL_20221106_180600774.jpg

PXL_20221106_180649318.jpg

Trans mount still attached to keep the subframe square.
PXL_20221106_180639525.jpg

PXL_20221106_180632238.jpg

PXL_20221106_180619317.jpg
 

71FuryGC

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I'm not doing anything until the subframe is done. I want to make sure I don't have to buy another, or worse, a parts car.
It was sandblasted this weekend, but a 2nd sandblast needs to be done.
They are planning to break off the welds for badly bent left side mount flange so it can be bent back into correct shape.
They are hoping to start welding Wednesday night
Views from below.
View attachment 566227
View attachment 566228
Trans mount still attached to keep the subframe square.
View attachment 566230
View attachment 566231
View attachment 566232
Looks like the old farmer drove it "Dukes of Hazard" style!!:steering: It does look repairable to my amateur eyes though. Nothing crunchy! Keep us posted......
 

Samplingman

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1667859026764.png


Why do you want to break the welds on this? It is probably easier to bend this back into shape in place. Any simple scissor jack and some heat from a map gas torch should walk this out completely.
 

fury fan

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Perhaps you've already fixed this, but:

Clamp some flat-bar to the red area and start to hammer the lip down flat - this will make the whole area stiffer for the next step. (obviously you can't do that the whole way to the tip due to the bend) Use your judgment for where having the lip helps, vs fights you to straighten the whole thing - this depends on how much twist is in the green area.

Attach a 3/4" Pony pipe clamp at either of the blue lines (simply depends on how it'll fit in there) and clamp to somewhere up at the engine crossmember that is stronger than what you're pulling here. (I can't speak for other brands, but I've abused Ponys for years and they are extremely durable)

After you have some tension on it, give a few well-placed hammer hits. Be aware the pipe clamp may pop up when the metal moves. (ziptie or bungee it to that availabe hole?) Assess, re-tighten the clamp, hit it again.

Cantilevered metal like this wants to absorb the hammer's energy via vibration, so the tension of the pipe clamp helps with that.
But the pipe clamp alone likely will not provide enough pull, so needs the hammer.

Intentional, well-placed hits will be your friend.

Then finish reworking the lip when it's all moved straight.

1669748415814.png
 

68PK21 440.6bbl

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Why beat yourself up (or the frame) trying to bend it cold... heat is your friend, believe me that was the downfall of my 2nd 1968 PK21, when I straightened the RF stub horn I did it without heat, the whole major part of the frame cracked a year later. When I bashed the LF of my 1968 Fury III I straightened the horn with heat, cherry red hot the whole horn area, a decade later when the car went to the boneyard, no cracks.

I hope you are going to measure the stub since you have it off the car (right?).


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1970FuryConv

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The stub frame is at a welder's shop under repair. They are going to use heat to bend the subframe mount.

How do you advise I measure it after I get it back?
 

68PK21 440.6bbl

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I have found a large pipe wrench to be helpful in situations like this. My old 3 foot has won it's share of battles! Lindsay
:rofl:

Gotta love it, plumber's tools, that's as bad as a mechanic that has a claw hammer in his Snap On box.

Rebuilt and Dyno Tested! - 440 from 1970 Coronet R_T Convertible_00_01_49_05.jpg


For anyone else doing something like this on your own (I did in my teens) rent yourself a Porto/Porta Power, or buy one for that matter, they ain't that expensive.

11-29-22.Porta-Power - AAA Equipment Center.www.aaaequipmentcenter.com.jpg



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Samplingman

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:rofl:

Gotta love it, plumber's tools, that's as bad as a mechanic that has a claw hammer in his Snap On box.

View attachment 569637

For anyone else doing something like this on your own (I did in my teens) rent yourself a Porto/Porta Power, or buy one for that matter, they ain't that expensive.

View attachment 569638


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You don’t need fancy tools to do most metal work on these cars. I own a porta-power, but I also use a 3 foot pipe wrench, claw hammer and one of my favorites, a spud wrench.
4AAA4D70-F82C-4C4E-BDA7-0D6FD4F89E2A.jpeg
 
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